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  1. #26
    Old and Fixed, Moderator
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    #1- Not original but it's worth repeating. Don't upgrade- ride up grades......

    #2- Learn basic bicycle mechanics. You should know how to change a flat, adjust your brakes and adjust your derailleurs.

    #3- If you think upgrading from Shimano 105 to Dura Ace will make you faster, you are sadly mistaken....

    #4- listen to MB1
    Dave Hickey/ Fort Worth

    My 3Rensho Blog: http://vintage3rensholove.blogspot.com/

  2. #27
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    Think less about gear & clothes, more about riding

    I've been posting here about as long as anybody, I think, and I'm constantly surprised at the number of posts about what kind of shorts/jersey/helmet ("Can I use an MB helmet on my road bike?")/even socks you should wear, or whether it's OK to use a triple if you can't climb hills in your 39-19. At the level where the huge majority of us ride, improvement is going to come from conditioning, not from taking 100 grams off the bike or changing pedal systems. Just get on and ride, and when you reach a point that the bike is holding YOU back, instead of the other way around, you'll know it and know what to do about it.

  3. #28
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    One for the new posters (titles of posts)

    Despite your overwhelming drive to be cute, please post using descriptive titles.

    Posting a question which title is "Do you think that .... " or "Why is it true that ... " is just annoying and non-informative. It will get a lot of hits, but not necessarily from the people who can actually answer.

    Posting a question which title is something along the lines of "How to true a wheel" is much, much better.

  4. #29
    Geezer Member
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    Most shifting problems can be cured by a half turn counter clock-wise on a barrel adjuster.

    Check/inflate your tires before every ride and give 'em a squeeze after every ride.(Twice I've discovered a tire with low preasure and a leak by doing this, it saves you from a flat on the road sometimes.)
    It's about pride.

  5. #30
    Fat Man Pedaling
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    Quote Originally Posted by MB1
    1) Ride lots.
    2-10) See #1

    O.K., O.K. I'll play nice.


    10) See #1

    A few bonuses;

    b3) Brooks saddles work.
    b6) You can replace an innertube and be back on the bike in less than 2 minutes. Practice, practice, practice.
    b7) See #1
    I was seriously considering getting rid of the bike and writing off cycling in January before I got my brooks b17 saddle. Check out wallbike.com for a 6 month return policy! Wish I had gotten the honey colored one but money is real tight.

    Most of all, have lots of fun. I complain that my speed improvement is coming so slowly and people advise me to go on group rides and get dropped by faster riders.

    Been there done that and the only advantage it has over being the last guy picked on your 6th grade gym class softball team is that at 40 years old, I am better equipped to deal with the humiliation. I suppose it would work, though.

    Gregg

  6. #31
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    as an avid mountain biker and a new road biker the only piece of advice i can offer is be on time for your rides or you may find yourself riding alone. no one likes showing up to your place for a 9 AM ride for you to still be sleeping and your bike is in various stages of disassembly.

    "dont worry i just have to put on a new rear derailleur and stop by the shop to get my wheels trued, we will be rolling in no time"

    maybe its just me but i get ready the night before a ride, not 20 minutes after you were supposed to meet.

    also dont make fun of the new guys. we may not have the best and most expensive gear but we do share the love of cycling and are having fun just the same as you.

  7. #32
    Travels by Map
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kvonnah
    here is just a quick one:

    After riding in the rain, the best and quickest way to dry out your shoes is to stuff them with newspaper.
    Remove the insoles first. Do this after every ride. If you let your shoes dry out, they should last longer and they'll be more comfortable when you put them back on.

  8. #33
    it's a nun eat nun world
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    Lightbulb Forget or break your tire levers?

    I know you shouldn't forget your tire levers but I have seen guys on mountain bikes leave there underseat bags open and then everything proceeded to bounce out and down the mountain.

    So if you find yourself without tire levers and a flat tire just use you quick release levers to get the job done. If you are worried about your nice shiny black rims getting scratched you can just walk out or wait for someone who was prepared!

  9. #34
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    Signal Like You're Turning Right, Then Go Straight

    One trick I like to do is when I'm approaching a 4 way stop with a car stopped at the intersection on my right waiting to see what I'll do, I'll occasionally (if the situation fits it) signal like I'm going to make a right hand turn, then as soon as the car goes I continue to go straight through the intersection. I do this to avoid the situation of both parties stopping to figure out who has the right of way. If people see you're signaling right, they don't hesitate to go, where as if you don't signal right, they may hesitate, then you both stop. So I pull this "white lie" to get the car to clear the intersection.

  10. #35
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    Agreed

    Quote Originally Posted by colker1
    mountain bikes should be short and small. road bikes are different animals.. don't buy smaller than the size you should ride. slightly bigger won't hurt.. while a too small road bike will make you give up road riding
    Agreed, here here!

  11. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by bikeboy389
    When you're removing pedals, always push the wrench handle toward the REAR of the bike to unscrew (reversed threads are confusing).
    Over the cranks and toward the hub ;) cuase you could go under and it would be the wrong way.

  12. #37
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    Tips???

    Lets see if I can help

    1. Always bring one extra water bottle
    2. Dont look at your speed
    3. always look up
    4. tuck your knees and elbows, and crouch in
    5. Only use brakes at intersections
    6. Petal 1/2 way down hill
    7. Jelly beans actually are good to eat on a ride
    8. bike at least 1 hr after eating
    9. if your going to ride go at least 45 minutes
    10. Dont own the road, share the road, thats how I hit a camaro at nearly 40 mph...
    Somewhere down the line the math went wrong...

  13. #38
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    I don't have 10, but...

    1) In the beginning, you only need to work on doing two things well - pedaling and breathing. Before you set all kinds of crazy weightloss, time/distance goals, work on being able to pedal smoothly and breathe in unison. I can lose miles of road and weeks of work stress just focusing on the Zen that is pedaling and breathing.

    2) Uphill is a state of mind. Your average NFL player would say that 90% of climbing is half mental. Seriously, embrace the hill - the climb is your friend. Glory is at the top of every climb. If you keep on riding the same hills, you'll notice they keep getting shorter with each ride.

    3) Ride at your pace. You may race at some point in the future, but there is no need to start now. If someone is flying by you up the hill, concentrate on your cadence and make sure it doesn't speed up. Until you've truly gotten to know your body, you'll just burn yourself out un-necessarily while providing a bit of comic relief for those who pass you. When you start doing it to others on a consistent basis, you'll be relieved to know that you were never "that guy".

    4) If you are in a ride group and have problems with your bike, look for someone with hair on their legs to help you. The individual will either be a Fred or a former MTB'er, but you'll have a much higher percentage chance of them helping you. Former MTB'ers are the best since they tend to still carry 10 lbs of tools around for the first 6 months of road riding.

    5) If you are biking solely for the purpose of losing weight, you need a change of attitude. You may actually gain weight for the first few months of riding as muscle builds on your body. My best advice is to not focus on your weight at all, instead focusing on having a good time riding. Exercise is not fun, but riding is. If you truly get the bug, you'll never have to worry about weight again anyway.

    6) Make friends with people who ride a lot. You might start riding with your regular friends, but you will find out over time that they are not nearly as consistent as the people you meet on the road/trail. Don't be afraid to introduce yourself to a group in the parking lot or at the trailhead. You may find yourself with a whole new circle of friends that will never flake on a ride.

    7) You are not Lance Armstrong. If you are just starting out on the bike, Cytomax, Gu, and powerbars are not going to help you. It will be awhile before you need to take on food for a ride.

  14. #39
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    remember

    1 Don't stand if you can sit and dont sit if you can lay down.
    2 Always bring a patch kit,tire irons and air pump/gun.
    3 Money is good, cell is better.
    4 Bring more food than you think you need on 4+ hour rides.
    5 Always where sunscreen, especially on road rash.
    6 Have a meal ready after a long ride so you can eat as soon as you get home.
    7 Pass as many people as possible!
    8 Helmets are a must.
    9 Spare batteries for your MP3 player
    10 The air conditioning turned on so you can sleep!

  15. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by denversean

    7) You are not Lance Armstrong. If you are just starting out on the bike, Cytomax, Gu, and powerbars are not going to help you. It will be awhile before you need to take on food for a ride.

    A true statement. Keep in mind that "a while " is the key operator here. Riders progress at different levels. That really depends on what level you are starting. If you haven't ridden a bike since you were a child, forget energy supplements. But...if you are somewhat physically fit and have experience on a mountain bike or with running, your road biking speed and stamina will increase quickly over a short time. Once you start really pushing yourself, energy gels will help. Cytomax is good for all levels of strenuous exercise because it decreases the lactic acid buildup that causes soreness.

  16. #41
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    Talking

    I know, I know no joking on this thread, but here are some etiquette tips I found that are funny as hell and have a slight amount of truth:

    1. If you pass an unaware cyclist: When passing another cyclist, there's a good chance she does not know you are behind her. If you say "Hi" as you go by, you may startle her, prompting her to fall off her bike (I have in fact actually caused a bike accident this way). If you ring your little bike bell, you may startle her similarly. If you ride by without saying anything, you will be thought of as inexplicably rude. What should you do? Speed up and yell "TRACK!" or "LEFT!" and blow by as impressively as possible.

    2. If you encounter a cyclist coming from the opposite direction: Cyclists are required by law to aknowledge one another, primarily to express solidarity and a shared love of the sport. You don't have long, but try to convey, with a simple gesture, "Hey, we're both on bikes and are therefore morally superior to the people currently in cars." But you've got to be casual about it. If you are riding in an upright position (mountain bike, cruiser), it's fine to lift your hand and wave. If you are on a road bike and have your hands on the hoods, lift the fingers of your left hand, without removing the hand from the hoods. If you are in the drops, a simple bob of the head will suffice.

    3. If you encounter a cyclist on a recumbent bicycle, in either direction: Spurn him. Do not aknowledge, and do not return aknowledgment if offered. Recumbent cycles are nothing more than a desperate plea for attention, and by acknowledging him, you become an enabler. Do not enable silliness, even if it works. Above all, do not express appreciation/admiration/interest in the recumbent cycle---even if you want one desperately.

    4. If you pass someone during a race: Do not say, "How's it going?" because the honest answer the person you're passing would have to give is, "Not as well as I previously thought." Instead, say, "Looking strong, dude," because it makes you sound generous, while at the same time implying that if your vanquished foe is looking strong, you are looking even stronger. It's all about psychology.

    5. If you are passed during a race: Don't give an excuse belittling your opponent's accomplishment (e.g., "My spleen hurts." or "I'm coughing up blood"). Instead, say, "Rock on, dude." It makes you sound like a good sport, not to mention a hep cat.

  17. #42
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    This comes up a couple times in here, bears repeating --

    Actually ensure you can change your tire and get back on the road with the tools you carry. Don't assume they're going to work. That bag under the seat is an "Emergency Kit" and needs to be maintained.

    Check tire pressure before EVERY ride. But you should also check out the whole bike before you jump on it and ride. Having the "wheels come off" at speed can get you killed. One reason road bikes are traditionally spotlessly clean is because cleaning the bike allows you to check over every little item -- cracked frames, loose nuts, frayed cables, uneven wheels/rims, brake releases in released position . . .

  18. #43
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    Useful for me:

    1: When I am biking when there is cold outside (around +8 degree Celsius or less),
    I usually fill up a glass of water and let it be in my room before I am leaving.
    More comfortably to drink water who has roomtemperature (+20 Celsius) that the
    cold water right from the fridge! It helps me to drink faster too.

    2: check regulary that the wheels are true. Avoids accident and breakdown out there.
    3: Check regulary that all of the screws and nuts are sitting firm. Anything can happen!

    4: Use thermos bottle to keep the water warm and at stable temperature.
    To drink +4 degree (ice and water) in 0 degree or less is awful.
    Easier to be dehydrating in such cold weather when the water is cold.
    I use 0.5 liters thermos bottles, these fit right in my bottle holder.
    it is always nice with cocoa/coffee at the long trips in the winter.
    Truly relaxing to drink hot coccoa after 7 hours in -7 degree Celsius!

    5: Try to NOT loose those (expensive) thermos bottle. (I usually does that.)

    6: Learn to know your own brakes. Learn to use the front brake.
    Learn to know the ground and the feeling when the front wheel is slipping.
    Then you releases the brake level a little. That help's a lot. Believe me.

    Locking the back wheel does not help much.
    The brake effect is at maximum when the both of wheels are at the slighty locking level, but still rolling slowly as possible without slipping.

    Experience is always a good thing. Learn to hold your brakehandle correct so you can
    brake effectly (I did that mistake first time, and braked weakly to avoid chrashing in a car!)

    7: have fun!

    8: When cycling with heavy bagage, try to have the most of it AT the bike, not at your back.
    More comfortable and one can be cycling longer/faster and be less tired.
    Believe me, 15kg at your back is not nice after one hours!
    if it is halfed down to 6-7kg, it would be much easier. Believe me, it is a big difference.

    9: Learn to know your own body. Feel your legs. Be patient and careful if they are weak or in pain.

    there! any comments?

  19. #44
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    Underwear?

    Sorry if this has been answered but why should one not wear underwear under cycle shorts?


    Cheers,


    Steve.

  20. #45
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    Ive only got one year and 2,000 miles on my bike's clock, but the one piece of advice I could give someone is the following:

    NEVER listen to the yahoos who blurt out "If youre not riding for at least X hours or X miles, its not doing a thing and isnt 'worth it'."

    Yeah...it would be GREAT if we had multiple hours to drop down 30-50 miles each day. But LIFE (and these days, less daylight) seem to often get in the way. If all youve got is 45 minutes to bang out 15 miles then take it, make the best of it and enjoy! Whatever your fitness level is, 45 minutes of good excercise is NEVER a bad thing, no matter what those snooty big shots tell you.

  21. #46
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    Darn Right

    Lesson #1:

    It is cheaper to diet than buy lightweight bike part.-- or a light bike for that matter.

    Get a bike that fits, don't worry about the weight until you're fast. Otherwise you are throwing your money away.

    But if a new bike catches your fancy....... well we all have a weakness.


  22. #47
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    Tip that may have been over looked

    Many new riders have to deal with saddle sore.

    A couple of things to keep in mind:

    High end shorts won't help.

    Saddles with lots of padding actually hurt you in the long run.

    Seats with the hole in them are questionable.

    Just ride a little bit shorter but more often and you'll find that the pain goes away.

    Good luck.

  23. #48
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    when being overtaken by a car from behind you, never ever assume its A car, assume its AT LEAST ONE car, possibly more. if not, you sometimes have a notion to move out into the lane and another car could be there.

  24. #49
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    1.) Buy and use chamois cream/balm when ever you ride. You will thank yourself.

    2.) Take AT LEAST two tubes with you. Always. Even if you are only going out for a 1 hour recovery ride.

    3.) Make eye contact with drivers. You have know idea if they know you are there, unless you make eye contact.

    4.) Buy a good frame pump. Micro pumps are small and light and all, but they suck for filling up tires.

    5.) Use hand signals.

    6.)Always have cash, ID, and a cell phone on you.

    7.) A tire at 110psi is faster, and more comfotable, than a tire at 130psi. Did I mention that it is faster?

    8.) If you are going to leave your bike in a black vehicle on a hot day while you go for a post race beer, let the air out of the tires.

    9.) A helmet is useless unless it fits you properly.

    10.) Buy new cleats every season. It makes your pedals feel new again for little money.

  25. #50
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    Ist post ever: No flaming!

    Quote Originally Posted by mtbbmet
    7.) A tire at 110psi is faster, and more comfotable, than a tire at 130psi. Did I mention that it is faster?
    Thank you for all the good tips. I'm curious: I can believe the "more comfortable" but I always thought higher pressure meant less rolling resistance, and is therefore "faster."

    Please explain the error in my thinking!





    Thanks,
    motobacon

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