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  1. #51
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    My 7 cents

    Don't overinflate the tires in an attempt to lower rolling resistance because you're guaranteed to get a flat along an imperfect road.

    When approaching a hill, switch to a lower gear than is immediately necesssary; one that will be appropriate when you're in the middle of the hill so that your cadence never slows

    Bike seats should be horizontal. Period.

    Raise the saddle if you are experiencing discomfort in the front of your knees. Lower the saddle if you experience pain in the back of your knees.

    Make sure to exercise and stretch the hamstrings because the quads are usually overdeveloped in riders and injury can result from the imbalance.

    Incorporate running into your regimen because weight-bearing exercise strengthens your bones. Alot of pro-riders don't like to walk or climb stairs because their muscles have become so specialized.

    Should you win a stage race, shake the champagne vigorously and wet the podium girls; they like that...and you might get lucky.
    Last edited by l_pirata; 11-27-2005 at 11:49 AM.

  2. #52
    haole from the mainland
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    The liners from your SIDI's can be washed

    Throw 'em in a lingerie bag; cold water cycle. Air dry and Voila! They'll smell good as new.

  3. #53
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    1.) cleats are dangerous on the slick concrete/tile floors in public restrooms.
    2.) take one small bite of your energy bar every 15mins- eating the whole thing at once will upset your stomach.
    3.) as you're riding "out," make mental notes of where water is available so that when you're riding "back," you'll know where to re-fill your bottles.
    4.) learn how to bunny-hop. it's more useful than you think, and people think it's really flippin' cool to see a roadie bunny-hop over a soda bottle at 25mph.
    5.) always smile and say "MORNIN'!" to people that you see, whether they are walking, jogging, or on bikes.
    6.) if you are planning on getting off of your bike and going indoors, whether it is a store or a friend's house or whatever, stop and check your face in the side mirror of parked car to make sure that you don't have snot hanging off your nose or something.
    7.) "cappuccino" flavor Powerbars stick to the wrapper like glue.
    8.) remember that what you do will affect the public's opinions of all cyclists.
    9.) people in cars cannot see cyclists. they just can't.
    10.) don't forget to have fun.
    your friendly neighborhood cyclist.

  4. #54
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    1. Make sure the bike fits. You'll enjoy riding more and stay with the sport longer.
    2. Be steady: keep your line, don't vary your speed suddenly when riding within a group, pay attention to what's happening around you.
    3. Drink!
    4. Cinelli cork bartape is very comfortable.
    5. I've seen more people fall down riding SPD pedals than anything else (couldn't unclip).
    6. Smile, wave to people and say hi. Be courteous.
    7. Learn how to draft correctly.
    8. Clean the bike. It's happier and faster that way.
    9. Get good tires and wheels. While Continental Grand Prix tires are not my favorite, you can't go wrong with them. Veloflex tires come off the rim very easily if you have a flat (very seldom with these tires). Velocity rims are very strong. Buy wheels suitable to your build and riding style.
    10. There's a reason for helmets. Protect your noggin. You never know when you're going down.

  5. #55
    Just Give 'Er!
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    some great advice here- surprisingly, though, group-riding skills/etiquette haven't really been touched on yet, so allow me:

    -If you're relatively new to group riding, stay on the left side of the back, away from the curb. You'll stay more clear of pot-holes, dips in the pavement and debris, and you won't feel trapped between other riders and the curb.
    -Don't overlap wheels when drafting. Keep your tire a bit to the left or right of the rider in front of you, but with your wheel 2 or 3 inches behind that rider's tire as well
    -If you're leading a pack on a descent, DO NOT use more brake than absolutely necessary.
    -Keep your upper body loose and relaxed- if you're squeezing the life outta your bars with tension, youre not able to pull off quick direction-changes
    -Point out pot holes, garbage, w/e, when in a pack. This is not so much a courtesy as a necessity when those behind you can't see the road.
    -Don't freak out when other riders bump into you lightly while riding, this is normal. Some more experienced riders may literally "push" you on a tough climb. accept the help gratefully.

    some other stuff: for the totally clueless noob, take your visor off your helmet if it's a mtb helmet. All it will give you is a back neck-ache from having to crane your neck to increase your field of vision. If you're trying to save money, do it on the jersey or the helmet, not the shorts. Camelbak's are for mountain bikes.
    cmatcan - I have to ask this - What the H%ll is that in your avatar??

  6. #56
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    I haven't seen this listed yet... What about your LBS?

    This might have been listed, but I didn't see it....

    Unless you are a master mechanic, develop a good relationship with your Local Bike Shop.
    But at the same time, don't use them to change a flat for you, they are pros and doing simple things like fixing flats is just wasting their time. When you need a great mechanic it will be worth all the extra 10 minutes of gabbing with them on a weekly or monthly basis. TRUST ME.
    Last edited by Sprocket - Matt; 02-03-2006 at 02:03 PM.
    You can ride a BIG WHEEL as long as it puts a smile on your face.

  7. #57
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    It surprises me...

    ...nobody said it's always a good idea to keep a presta/schraeder adapter with them. Here's the scoop. I keep a mini-pump...say what you will...which works well in getting the tube pretty much inflated. When I reach the first gas station I use the adapter and fill the tire as needed. Most of the time I am close...within 20psi always. It works for me...but then I AM one of those ex-MTB'ers that carry 10 pounds of tools.

  8. #58
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    Mark chain when cleaning or lubing

    When cleaning and lubing my chain, I have one link that I've market on the side with a black magic marker as my starting and ending point.

  9. #59
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    When putting on tires, line up the label with the stem. That way when you get a flat and find the hole in the tube you know where to look on or in the tire to see if there is a rip or even glass still in the tire.

  10. #60
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    Someone posted:

    9 Spare batteries for your MP3 player

    Should you really ride with a iPod? I haven't even bought my bike yet (still in the "am I really going to use it enough to justify a mortgage payment" phase), but is seems like common sense that you will want to be able to hear things around you. I wear the iPod while i run, but I also run on sidewalks or jogging paths, and need not worry about that idiot in the Excursion with the cell phone tucked under their chin reaching around to smack the misbahving youngster or dog.

  11. #61
    You're Not the Boss of Me
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    Sorry, Gotta Disagree with This one!

    Quote Originally Posted by solorider
    Many new riders have to deal with saddle sore.

    A couple of things to keep in mind:

    High end shorts won't help.

    Seats with the hole in them are questionable.

    Good luck.

    I beg to differ. Shorts quality DOES matter, and a lot. Sadly, quality is proportionate to cost. Cheap shorts with funky seams can absolutely lead to misery.

    And at least for women, "seats with the hole in them" dominate the lion's share of the serious recreational roadie market and with good reason... a little relief for soft tissue. Next time you are with an experienced group of women riders, count the number of Terry saddles... I'm just saying...

  12. #62
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    Ipods are great for the bike path solo ride.
    The key to using it, is low volume.
    Super Clyde
    05 Felt F65
    Wheels - Ultegra hubs, 32h, Mavic A719 rims

  13. #63
    MING
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    my 2 cents

    1- slow and ask everyone on the side of the road with a mechanical if they have everything they need. not everyone is a former mountain biker.

    2- commute to work by bike, its great.

    3- read this whole thread.

    4- bike trainers can work as poor-mans work stands.

    5- ive found its very beneficial to ride with someone faster than you and someone slower than you. do it separately. pass on the knowledge.

    6- carry id yes, but also carry a bank card and health insurance info, esp if youve an conditions or allergies.

    7- throw your energy wrappers on the side of the road/trail and i will hunt you down and give them back to you in a VERY pissed off manner.

    8- if you ride with an ipod do so responsibly. i cut off one earbud and rewired both channels into the remaining side, i wear it on the non road side, low volume with the inline remote. tool is some of the better riding music.

    9- turn your lights on before you need to. from personal experience you will get alot better settlement from insurance companies if you had you lights on when you were hit, you were doing your part to be seen.

    10- dont listen to me. ride, spring is here and its nice, get out and ride

  14. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by purplepaul
    The pain was in the front just left of center and it was excruciating. A friend who is a physical therapist probed my knee and my leg and said that I needed to stretch my inner thigh. Muscles and tendons can get so tight that they actually pull the knee joint out of alignment, thus causing pain and inflammation.

    Hey Paul, I've had the same problem (but was never diagnosed correctly); what's your stretch routine like for your inner thigh (or whatever stretches help the knee alignment problem)?

    Much thanks!

    paul

  15. #65
    It's all ball bearings
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    Good advice, I'll add a few more.

    Quote Originally Posted by cmatcan
    some great advice here- surprisingly, though, group-riding skills/etiquette haven't really been touched on yet, so allow me:

    -If you're relatively new to group riding, stay on the left side of the back, away from the curb. You'll stay more clear of pot-holes, dips in the pavement and debris, and you won't feel trapped between other riders and the curb.
    -Don't overlap wheels when drafting. Keep your tire a bit to the left or right of the rider in front of you, but with your wheel 2 or 3 inches behind that rider's tire as well
    -If you're leading a pack on a descent, DO NOT use more brake than absolutely necessary.
    -Keep your upper body loose and relaxed- if you're squeezing the life outta your bars with tension, youre not able to pull off quick direction-changes
    -Point out pot holes, garbage, w/e, when in a pack. This is not so much a courtesy as a necessity when those behind you can't see the road.
    -Don't freak out when other riders bump into you lightly while riding, this is normal. Some more experienced riders may literally "push" you on a tough climb. accept the help gratefully.
    -If riding in a pack with riders next to you on either side, it's safest to have your bars immediately adjacent to either their bars or their hips. As the above post said, don't worry about knocking bars, elbows, or hips with your neighbor.

    -Avoid using brakes when in a paceline/pack at all. If you need to slow down, sit up taller, or move out to the side slightly and allow the airstream to slow you down.

    -Pass along any messages you receive from the front to the guy behind you. For instance, if someone up front shouts "pothole", pass the message along by shouting "pothole" to the riders behind you. Same thing goes for pointing at hazards.

    -If you need to spit in a paceline/pack, spit down between your arm and your thigh, NOT out to the side.

    -Learn to remove and replace your water bottle from/to its cage by feel without looking down.

    -When it's your turn to pull at the front of a paceline, don't suddenly speed up so that your riders can't hang on. Maintain the pace that the line had before you started pulling (unless, of couse, you are in a race and you want to make an attack straight off the front). You can gradually increase your speed when pulling if the line wants to pick up the pace.

    -Pull for a minimum of 10 seconds, but don't pull for longer than you feel you are capable of sustaining.

    -At the front, you are the eyes of the paceline. Warn riders behind you of hazards by calling out the hazard and pointing to it (pothole, gravel, storm drain, etc). Also call out and sudden slows, stops, and turns.

    -When you are done with your pull, look back over your shoulder to make sure nobody is gonna be in your way when you peel off to the side. Peel off when it's clear. If necessary, you can give a "wave" or a flick with your elbow to signal the rider behind you to pass or take over.

    -When you are at the back, call out "car back" when a car is approaching from behind. Also, when the next rider peels of the front and joins the back, tell him "last rider" or just "last" to let him know that he needs to get on your wheel.

    -The back of the paceline requires the second most amount of work, after the front. It's easy for a newb to fall off the back if he's not on the ball. Stick close to the guy in front of you and stay on point.
    Last edited by BenWA; 05-15-2006 at 01:12 PM.

  16. #66
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    -The back of the paceline requires the second most amount of work, after the front. It's easy for a newb to fall off the back if he's not on the ball. Stick close to the guy in front of you and stay on point.
    I thought second wheel was the next hardest, and so forth and so on, until about tenth/twelfth wheel, after which it was pretty much consistent.

  17. #67
    It's all ball bearings
    Reputation: BenWA's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bill
    I thought second wheel was the next hardest, and so forth and so on, until about tenth/twelfth wheel, after which it was pretty much consistent.
    You are right that there is a decrease in drag with each successive rider from the front, but the last rider has it worse than even the second rider because a) he is the only rider of the line subject to the backdraw turbulence that tends to "suck" the rider off the back (this is an oversimplification of the aerodynamic forces at work)...he essentially inherits the disrupted airflow/wake eddies of the entire paceline, and b) because he feels slinky effect around corners the most and generally has to work the hardest to reel himself back in to the rest of the group during any slinkying.
    Last edited by BenWA; 05-15-2006 at 01:20 PM.

  18. #68
    It's all ball bearings
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    Smile

    Quote Originally Posted by MB1
    3) It is not the bike, it is the legs.

    4) It is not the legs, it is the lungs.
    The proceeding statement is true: the preceeding statement was false.

  19. #69
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    because it can get caught in your spokes

  20. #70
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    Undies

    Because it has been known to get stuck in your spokes. i love the freedom cycling naked can give

  21. #71
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    You da (wo) man!

    Quote Originally Posted by jtolleson
    I beg to differ. Shorts quality DOES matter, and a lot. Sadly, quality is proportionate to cost. Cheap shorts with funky seams can absolutely lead to misery.

    And at least for women, "seats with the hole in them" dominate the lion's share of the serious recreational roadie market and with good reason... a little relief for soft tissue. Next time you are with an experienced group of women riders, count the number of Terry saddles... I'm just saying...
    right on girlfriend!!

  22. #72
    Milk Thief
    Reputation: WrongBikeFred's Avatar
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    I'm supprised MB1 hasen't said this yet. COMMUTE!!!. This does not have to be to work, or atleast not at first. You just need to use your bike for transportation as well as for fun at least a couple of times per week. Ride to work, visit friends, run errands or visit your LBS (Locan Bike Shop). It teaches you to ride in all conditions and to be much more aware of your surroundings, both on and off the bike. It also makes you a much better driver.

    If a snake is born with two heads, the heads will fight over who gets beer.

  23. #73
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    Just a few more from a beginner

    1. Get a good floor pump
    2. Inflate your tires to the right pressure before each ride (or learn how to repair pinch flats real well)
    3. Get a saddle bag for the necessities
    4. Shirts with pockets are great for phones, energy bars, keys, etc.
    5. Better to overdress and remove clothes
    6. A hat or headband will keep your ears warm on cold days
    7. Ditto for shoe covers and your toes
    8. Pretend you are scraping something off the sole of your shoe on the up stroke
    9. Steady beats surging
    10. Use your legs as shocks on bumpy roads

  24. #74
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    Cycling shorts are like swim trunks---designed to be all inclusive and self-sufficient. They have a nice chamois (that strange looking pad covering your nether regions that makes you look like your shorts are full of sh*t when you walk around in public wearing them) that is meant to cushion, ventilate, and directly comfort those nether regions, possibly aided by a nice skin lubricant like Body Glide or Chamois Creme (various brands). Wearing underwear inside your shorts separates you from the chamois negating its function, and allows for the additonal to bunch up in tight spots and actually cause mroe saddle sores or blisters. Cotton underwear in particular is a problem as it holds moisture and causes chafing and possible jock itch to set in. Bike shorts are designed to both comfort and breath simultaneously, and wearing underwear underneath them blocks both effects. Don't worry, you will get used to the feeling after only a few rides and will quickly figure out that we are right and why.

  25. #75
    Seanahee
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    My $.02

    What a great thread -- thanks!

    My biggest thing (and I'm certainly still a newbie) is to embrace riding consistently, even if it's only a short ride. I'm now riding every day conditions permit. When I'm riding regularly, I want to ride more. When I get out of the habit, getting back in is so much harder.

    And, I learned some stuff...

    1) No more underwear beneath my cycling shorts. Finally, I get it!!!! Going to buy a second pair today.

    2) I found a way to control new bike lust and carbon-fiber-itis; can't buy a new one until the one-year anniversary of my Giant OCR3.

    3) Need to stash a 20 in the seat bag.

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