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  1. #1
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    Question Best way to lighten up my 2001 Cannondale R600

    I have a 2001 Cannondale R600 road bike and would like to lighten it up by approx. two pounds. What would be the best approach? I would like to do this in stages as my budget is limited.

    Here is my thinking:
    1. Seat post
    2. Wheelset
    3. ????

    What else can I do to shave off the pounds on my bike.



  2. #2
    Impulse Athletic Coaching
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    Seat post won't do anything worthwhile. Check the saddle, fork, pedals, and wheels, in reverse order.

    Ultimately, the only money worth dumping into it is a wheelset which can be used on a future bike.

    Ride lots.

  3. #3
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    Money pit

    Quote Originally Posted by jtcastillo
    I have a 2001 Cannondale R600 road bike and would like to lighten it up by approx. two pounds. What would be the best approach? I would like to do this in stages as my budget is limited.

    Here is my thinking:
    1. Seat post
    2. Wheelset
    3. ????
    The only way you could shave 900 gm off ANY bike would be to replace nearly everything. Even if you had really heavy wheels and got really light wheels, that's 450 gm (1 lb.). Then it's pedals, cranks, bars, stem, derailleurs, etc. to get the other 450 gm. Your best bet is to put that $$ into your savings for a new, lighter bike.

  4. #4
    RoadBikeReview's Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kerry Irons
    The only way you could shave 900 gm off ANY bike would be to replace nearly everything. Even if you had really heavy wheels and got really light wheels, that's 450 gm (1 lb.). Then it's pedals, cranks, bars, stem, derailleurs, etc. to get the other 450 gm. Your best bet is to put that $$ into your savings for a new, lighter bike.
    Huh?
    OK?
    I have a 555g crank on my Litespeed Ultimate. 162g BB.
    My Trek 1200 has a 1020g Crank. 280g BB.
    Say I saw my LS stuff onto my Trek. Loss on the crank, 465g. BB, 118.
    583.
    Now, I have Bontrager Race Lite Hardcases on the Trek. 240g each. Lets change those into Kenda Criteriums, 195g each.
    90g Loss. Now we're at 673g lost.
    My Trek has a heavy saddle on it. I don't even know the brand. But the seatpost/saddle combo weighs in at a hefty 480g.
    Lets put a Selle Italia SLR on it, and an ExtraLite Ti Lite (~80 bucks) post on it. 135+150g
    195g lost.
    Now, we're at 868g lost.
    Let's go for broke now. My Trek's wheelset weighs in at a mind-boggling 2100g. Let's put on some 750 buck or so customs, DT Swiss 240s hubs, DT Revolution 15/17ga spokes, DT RR1.1 rims. 1413g for the pair.
    687g lost right there.


    Do all those to my Trek and I lose 1555g.
    Kerry, I didn't replace that many parts, and none of those were unreasonable replacements, and I actually didn't choose anything that expensive. (Well, the wheelset, but that's a really nice wheelset, and for the money, it's a steal.)
    No carbon goodies, well, except the crankset. Which I got from a friend for 50 bucks, with the 162g BB.

    To the OP: Wheels! Weigh your parts, too. Look for something that is uncharacteristically heavy, and replace those weak spots. Set a limit on how much you'll pay to lose your 2 pounds. Plan out all your upgrades. Make sure you spread your money out to fill the 900g you want to lose.
    -estone2

  5. #5
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Thanks guys for the input. I am new to road riding and I have a tendency to over do my hobbies. I think I need to do some more riding and homework before I start spending dough.

    I think wheels will be my first change than I'll work on the other. Thanks again for your input.

  6. #6
    Obviously not doping
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    The two best places to drop weight for a new rider...

    there are two places that you can lose 2 lbs faster and cheaper than anywhere else, and I am surprised that no one mentioned these yet... you gut and you a$$. Do a google search to figure out how many calories you should take in as an active cyclist if weight loss is your goal and stick to that, and ride lots and you'll drop 2 lbs faster than the check would clear for a new wheel set. Ride this bike until the wheels fall off and then worry about getting a nicer bike. I have a Trek 1500 and if you search my posts, you'll see that I asked all the same questions, and what I have come to realize from all the responses that I got on this forum and just getting out and riding is that the bike accounts for maybe 10% of your performance. the other 90% is the person in the saddle. I would bet that if you did trim the 2 lbs off your bike, the only place you would be if it was hanging on a scale. Ride lots, figure out what you like about riding and if you'll be racing, what type of racing, or if you'll be doing long charity and group rides, and then buy a bike that is more suited for what you like to do, but until then, get the rider in the best shape you can. Now, go out and ride, that is a nice bike and it is getting jealous of the time you are spending here and not out on the road.

  7. #7
    Arrogant roadie.....
    Reputation: Dave_Stohler's Avatar
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    Well, if you remove the seatpost and saddle altogether, you'll lose about 500g....

    Seriously, let's keep things in perspective. WHY do you want to remove 2 lbs? You won't be noticeably faster, and if you keep the weight on the bike, theoretically, it will make you train harder.

    If, for some reason, someday you are going to race and really need that 2 lb reduction in weight, just remove your water bottle-it weighs about 2 lbs filled.
    We are the 801
    We are the central shaft

  8. #8
    Lemur-ing
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    I think he just wants a lighter bike for the fun of having a lighter bike.. Is that true (OP) ?

    My Madone SSL weighs about 7.48kg and it's using a Bontrager Race X Lite Limited Edition crank (chose this over Dura Ace just to try it out) and frankly, I still whizz past those Cannondales and Colnagos that weigh 'illegally' at around 6.2kg or so.. Do I wish my bike was lighter? Well, for performance, no.. But for the fun of it, yeah.

    I'm switching to a Dura Ace crankset real soon because I don't like the way my BB sounds at times and I simply just wanna use a full Dura Ace setup and am looking at a 1100 gram or so wheelset (vs. my carbon aeros at 1423grams) I can't lose any more body weight at 5'9'' and 132 lbs (in fact, I think I'll needa gain about 8 pounds or so but that's a different story of power and all)

    To the OP, if you really wanna shed bike weight, try looking at the Bontrager Race X Lite Pro saddle, weighing only about 150 grams. Seatpost won't do much I guess but you could try it.

    Go to http://weightweenies.starbike.com/li...ms&sortby=real

    and they have some really light stems at pretty cheap prices as well.

    Cranksets might shave weight off but I honestly wouldn't go for anything lighter then Dura Ace for now even if others are lighter (because Dura Ace 7800 simply is awesome). But, that's personal preference and I know a guy who uses carbon chainrings (the 6.2kg Cannondale Six13 guy) and his chain teeth look like they're crying out for mercy.. But, the guy has money so replacing them ain't a concern I guess as long as his bike's light.

    As for wheels, well, depending on how heavy yours are now, you might need to spend a lot to get real savings. But, since you're on a budget, I suggest just riding hard and getting better over time and saving up so that in time, once you're even more into cycling and all that, you would have money to get a new, nicer and better wheelset that's like a reward for your improvement. That way, you'll feel good knowing you've improved and that better equipment is coming your way!

  9. #9
    Man, I'm Awesome
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    Convert it to a fixed gear with no brakes.

  10. #10
    You're Not the Boss of Me
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kerry Irons
    The only way you could shave 900 gm off ANY bike would be to replace nearly everything. Even if you had really heavy wheels and got really light wheels, that's 450 gm (1 lb.). Then it's pedals, cranks, bars, stem, derailleurs, etc. to get the other 450 gm. Your best bet is to put that $$ into your savings for a new, lighter bike.
    Ditto ditto ditto

    Your "bucks per saved gram" ratio is going to be terrible, you'd have more money into the Canny than it is worth, and I'd be shocked if when riding you could tell the difference. I think bike weight is overrated, but if it IS a goal then put that dough into a new carbon ride with high-zoot componentry.
    JESUS IS COMING

    ... look busy

  11. #11
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    Spend less on food and save for a new bike

    Unless you're eerily fit, the best way to take two pounds off the bike-rider combo is to lose weight yourself.
    A couple of years ago I was feeling pretty proud of myself because I'd gained "only" a couple of pounds a year while a lot of my friends had porked up. What I was overlooking was that I'd gained two pounds a year since the Reagan administration. I picked up the mileage and cut back on the fourth meal of the day, and in about six months lost 35+ pounds (diet and exercise--who would've thought THAT would work?). That's a bike and a half, for me (I ride a 64cm frame w/Brooks saddle; weighs a lot). It made a huge difference, and it's almost free.

  12. #12
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by uzziefly
    I think he just wants a lighter bike for the fun of having a lighter bike.. Is that true (OP) ?

    My Madone SSL weighs about 7.48kg and it's using a Bontrager Race X Lite Limited Edition crank (chose this over Dura Ace just to try it out) and frankly, I still whizz past those Cannondales and Colnagos that weigh 'illegally' at around 6.2kg or so.. Do I wish my bike was lighter? Well, for performance, no.. But for the fun of it, yeah.
    Yeah, I just wanted to lighten it up for fun. Realisticly, I think I'm going to ride more and eventually buy a new bike all together! I like the Cannondale Six13.

  13. #13
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Yeah, yeah.

    Quote Originally Posted by brianmcg
    Convert it to a fixed gear with no brakes.
    Yeah! Although I have no experience with these types of bikes.

  14. #14
    RoadBikeReview's Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by jtcastillo
    Yeah, I just wanted to lighten it up for fun. Realisticly, I think I'm going to ride more and eventually buy a new bike all together! I like the Cannondale Six13.
    Have you tried Cannondale's CAAD9? I've not ridden it yet, but I know that their CAAD8 was nice, and actually felt much snappier to me than the Six13, which actually felt kind of sluggish, and heavy to me. (Heavy in the metaphorical sense. I have no idea how much it actually weighed)

    Also, shameless advertising, but try a Litespeed. I ride a 2005 Ultimate and love it. 2006 Sienna was nice, when I rented one. Well, not just a litespeed. Try any Ti bike. They last forever, their reweldable, they ride soft and smooth, the paint doesnt chip (cuz there isn't any) so they always look new if you take careof them... etc.

  15. #15
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    i had this exact same bike (52) and really liked it. I made a number of performance upgrades that inadvertantly lightened it up. the 01 r600 was a terrific bike stock, but with upgrades it was a knockout. its a pretty light bike to begin with so making it lighter was a matter of upgrading.

    heres what i did:

    1. swapped out the coda triple crankset for ultegra double cranks and bb. (this was a big performance improvement)
    2. swapped out the rear derailluer to ultegra short cage.
    3. swapped out the front derraileur to shimano 105.
    4. upgraded to ITM Millenium stem.
    5. wheels- mavic cosmos with continental attack/force tires. (this was probably the biggest weight factor)
    6. brakes- replaced the crappy coda set with 105 calipers. saved weight and gained safety.

    this made a huge difference in weight- probably 1.5-2 lbs for a total weight of around 18lbs with pedals. if i kept the bike longer i would have upgraded the seatpost to something carbon to soften the ride and save grams, but decided to sell it and go for a larger size caad 8 frame.

    good luck.

  16. #16
    Mr_Snips
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    just get that...lol. thats my 2006 CAAD 8 R5000, it weighs under 17 pounds(probobly close to 16.5) and is stiff as hell. Plus its one of the best deals for the money.
    "If I was worried about 90 grams, I'd stop eating donuts in the morning,"~Bobby Julich

  17. #17
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    Thanks for the advise.

    Quote Originally Posted by pomole
    6. brakes- replaced the crappy coda set with 105 calipers. saved weight and gained safety.
    I noticed these brakes aren't very good.

  18. #18
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    i second mr.snips. thats exactly waht i did in the long run.

    the caad 8 & 9s pack so much bang for your $ these days that you might as well get a new ride instead of upgrading.

    -pom

  19. #19
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    I like Cannondales in general

    Quote Originally Posted by pomole
    i second mr.snips. thats exactly waht i did in the long run.

    the caad 8 & 9s pack so much bang for your $ these days that you might as well get a new ride instead of upgrading.

    -pom
    I think I'll ride and ride and save. Then I'll buy another bike. CAAD8 and 9 looks good. OR maybe something Ti?

  20. #20
    Burning Fists of Love
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    easy solution

    Big bowl of high fiber cereal. Beans for lunch and huge cup of coffee. After your 2 pound dump, you re ready.

    HOWEVER, there are those who have doubted the veracity of the claim that a 2 pound dump is possible. Well, all I have to say is that I have never ever been dedicated enough to weigh my output. Sure, I mean I have to eyeball it and guess. Truthfully, the old colon cannon is an amazing thing and never ever to be underestimated.

    BUT, proper diet and nutrition are far better approaches and in the end, make you a better cyclist.
    This old anvil has cracked alot of hammers

  21. #21
    the_rydster
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    Remove yer front wheel, fork and brake and learn to wheely.

    That should be at least 2lbs.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by ttug
    Big bowl of high fiber cereal. Beans for lunch and huge cup of coffee. After your 2 pound dump, you re ready.

    HOWEVER, there are those who have doubted the veracity of the claim that a 2 pound dump is possible. Well, all I have to say is that I have never ever been dedicated enough to weigh my output. Sure, I mean I have to eyeball it and guess. Truthfully, the old colon cannon is an amazing thing and never ever to be underestimated.
    ROFL!!!!!!

    Main thing to remember about that Kilo-class dump-

    Timing is everything.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr_Snips2


    just get that...lol. thats my 2006 CAAD 8 R5000, it weighs under 17 pounds(probobly close to 16.5) and is stiff as hell. Plus its one of the best deals for the money.
    wow!!, that is a beautiful bike you have there!!

  24. #24
    Lemur-ing
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr_Snips2


    just get that...lol. thats my 2006 CAAD 8 R5000, it weighs under 17 pounds(probobly close to 16.5) and is stiff as hell. Plus its one of the best deals for the money.

    How much is a CAAD8? What about the CAAD 9? Main difference? Thanks.

    Nice bike!

  25. #25
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    TTUG is right on

    Large serving of Uncle Sam's Cereal (100% flaxs) each morning and you will be lighter than the bike!
    "The problem with losing your mind is that by the time you realize it's gone, it's too late to get it back."
    Walk in the Woods by Bill Bryson

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