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  1. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by mcs001 View Post
    Thanks, Lombard, for your advise.
    Yes I'm in Los Angeles. I'm sure there are good LBS around if I look hard :-) I just thought I like to do everything from the web :-)
    The web is convenient for sure. But even though I do a lot of my own wrenching, I realize that sooner or later, there will be something I won't be able to do. When that happens, being on good terms with my LBS is priceless.

    An LBS will also include a fit with your purchase. You can't get that on the web. An LBS will also follow up with you and make free adjustments for a time after your purchase. They will charge for these services on an outside bike.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  2. #27
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    Thanks again for the reply! What kind of adjustment are you talking about? Beside the seat/bar heights which are easy? Like you, I did most of my wrenching on my cars & motorcycles. When there was something that I couldn't or wouldn't do, I just let a shop do it. They work for money, they don't work for good terms :-)

    I will call a lbs to check things out.
    Thanks again!


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  3. #28
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    You know, since these on-line retailers started selling nearly-complete bikes, I've seen some ridiculous setups. One guy had his bars rotated so far forward, you couldn't actually ride in the drops. another Motobecane I saw, the guy had turned the fork backwards!
    "L'enfer, c'est les autres"

  4. #29
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    Beginners need to consider what to do with bike maintenances, when they buy new bikes.

    if one does not like DIY, LBS should be better because many LBS offers lifetime basic tune ups. Still part price will be much higher than web stores.
    also you don’t need to worry about fitting.

    if one like DIY maintenances, online stores are better because of prices but in the beginning, it will cost decent money to buy tools especially bike stand and entire tool kits. also there will be decent mistakes from being new to bike maintenances.

  5. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by mcs001 View Post
    What kind of adjustment are you talking about? Beside the seat/bar heights which are easy?
    There are quite a few other adjustments besides saddle and bar height. Saddle fore and aft, saddle tilt, bar tilt, stem length, etc. If you went to a shop for a fit, you would probably be surprised how much better the bike feels.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  6. #31
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    Thanks for the info! You said "adjust stem length", that's raising/lowering the stem, yes?

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  7. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kimguroo View Post
    Beginners need to consider what to do with bike maintenances, when they buy new bikes.

    if one does not like DIY, LBS should be better because many LBS offers lifetime basic tune ups. Still part price will be much higher than web stores.
    also you don’t need to worry about fitting.

    if one like DIY maintenances, online stores are better because of prices but in the beginning, it will cost decent money to buy tools especially bike stand and entire tool kits. also there will be decent mistakes from being new to bike maintenances.
    Thanks for the reply. As I said, I have been doing my own maintenance/repair/service on my own cars and motorcycle for the last 20+ years, so I think I can learn bicycles :-) Once I bought a car or motorcycle from a dealer, they never saw me again :-)

    Sent from my Moto G (4) using Tapatalk

  8. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by mcs001 View Post
    Thanks for the info! You said "adjust stem length", that's raising/lowering the stem, yes?
    I used the wrong word "adjust" in this case. Just about all stems now are not threaded. Stems need to be changed out to be "adjusted". Stems can be shorter/longer or a different angle.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  9. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by mcs001 View Post
    Thanks for the info! You said "adjust stem length", that's raising/lowering the stem, yes?

    Sent from my Moto G (4) using Tapatalk
    I'm sorry to appear like an @ss, but that comment right there highlights your ignorance. Bikes these days don't have threaded forks/head sets that allow you to raise and lower the stem like they did 20 years ago. Once the fork is cut, you don't raise or lower the stem (I guess you could lower it if there's some spacers). I think Lombard was referring to the length of the stem. Stems come in various lengths and various angles. What you get on the Motobecane from Bikes Direct might be too long or too short, or the angle of the stem might not be the best for you. Since you know nothing about how a bike is supposed to fit, you just ride it anyway, never knowing that what you really need is a stem that's different than what the bike came with. After a while, you quit riding because your back is sore, or your wrists get sore. There's a lot of things like how high you raise the saddle, how far forward or backward it's positioned, is it level -- are the brakes/shifters placed on the bars in the right place -- are the cleats in your shoes set right -- do you need a seat post with set back or not -- etc.

    I get it that you're a mechanical genius who can fix anything. But you know nothing about bikes and how they are supposed to fit. Yes, you can do all that stuff yourself, but you really ought to consider getting a little advice on what to look for. Sounds like you had a bad experience at a bike shop. Some of them can be a little snooty. So try a different shop. REI is OK, but they really don't specialize in bicycles. I'd advocate going to a real bike shop for your first real bike. And don't expect to find a bike for $500 -- even $1000 is a pretty low budget. Yes, you can get a better deal on the web, but you can also get a bike that really fits you poorly and isn't much fun to ride. And that's not a good deal. Once you figure out what works for you, then you can get that bargain titanium Dura Ace equipped bike from Bikes Direct, perhaps swap out the stem and the saddle/post so it fits well.

  10. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by pmf View Post
    I'm sorry to appear like an @ss, but that comment right there highlights your ignorance. Bikes these days don't have threaded forks/head sets that allow you to raise and lower the stem like they did 20 years ago. Once the fork is cut, you don't raise or lower the stem (I guess you could lower it if there's some spacers). I think Lombard was referring to the length of the stem. Stems come in various lengths and various angles. What you get on the Motobecane from Bikes Direct might be too long or too short, or the angle of the stem might not be the best for you. Since you know nothing about how a bike is supposed to fit, you just ride it anyway, never knowing that what you really need is a stem that's different than what the bike came with. After a while, you quit riding because your back is sore, or your wrists get sore. There's a lot of things like how high you raise the saddle, how far forward or backward it's positioned, is it level -- are the brakes/shifters placed on the bars in the right place -- are the cleats in your shoes set right -- do you need a seat post with set back or not -- etc.

    I get it that you're a mechanical genius who can fix anything. But you know nothing about bikes and how they are supposed to fit. Yes, you can do all that stuff yourself, but you really ought to consider getting a little advice on what to look for. Sounds like you had a bad experience at a bike shop. Some of them can be a little snooty. So try a different shop. REI is OK, but they really don't specialize in bicycles. I'd advocate going to a real bike shop for your first real bike. And don't expect to find a bike for $500 -- even $1000 is a pretty low budget. Yes, you can get a better deal on the web, but you can also get a bike that really fits you poorly and isn't much fun to ride. And that's not a good deal. Once you figure out what works for you, then you can get that bargain titanium Dura Ace equipped bike from Bikes Direct, perhaps swap out the stem and the saddle/post so it fits well.
    OP, all good information here, if not a bit heavy handed.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  11. #36
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    That's why I try to learn. I know I'm not fortunate to born with the knowledge like you...

    Translation: go **** yourself if I care.

    Quote Originally Posted by pmf View Post
    I'm sorry to appear like an @ss, but that comment right there highlights your ignorance. Bikes these days don't have threaded forks/head sets that allow you to raise and lower the stem like they did 20 years ago. Once the fork is cut, you don't raise or lower the stem (I guess you could lower it if there's some spacers). I think Lombard was referring to the length of the stem. Stems come in various lengths and various angles. What you get on the Motobecane from Bikes Direct might be too long or too short, or the angle of the stem might not be the best for you. Since you know nothing about how a bike is supposed to fit, you just ride it anyway, never knowing that what you really need is a stem that's different than what the bike came with. After a while, you quit riding because your back is sore, or your wrists get sore. There's a lot of things like how high you raise the saddle, how far forward or backward it's positioned, is it level -- are the brakes/shifters placed on the bars in the right place -- are the cleats in your shoes set right -- do you need a seat post with set back or not -- etc.

    I get it that you're a mechanical genius who can fix anything. But you know nothing about bikes and how they are supposed to fit. Yes, you can do all that stuff yourself, but you really ought to consider getting a little advice on what to look for. Sounds like you had a bad experience at a bike shop. Some of them can be a little snooty. So try a different shop. REI is OK, but they really don't specialize in bicycles. I'd advocate going to a real bike shop for your first real bike. And don't expect to find a bike for $500 -- even $1000 is a pretty low budget. Yes, you can get a better deal on the web, but you can also get a bike that really fits you poorly and isn't much fun to ride. And that's not a good deal. Once you figure out what works for you, then you can get that bargain titanium Dura Ace equipped bike from Bikes Direct, perhaps swap out the stem and the saddle/post so it fits well.
    Sent from my Moto G (4) using Tapatalk

  12. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by mcs001 View Post
    That's why I try to learn. I know I'm not fortunate to born with the knowledge like you...

    Translation: go **** yourself if I care.



    Sent from my Moto G (4) using Tapatalk
    Well, you sure don't learn very fast -- seems like you're getting consistent advice here that you choose to ignore. Maybe you can fix a lot of stuff, but you can't fix stupid. People here have experience. Why bother asking if you ignore what we all say?

    Go ahead, order a $400 bike from Bikes Direct. Let us all know how great it is.

  13. #38
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    You know, I really wish I was born with bicycle knowledge like you.

    You really need to go f u c k. Yourself...
    Quote Originally Posted by pmf View Post
    Well, you sure don't learn very fast -- seems like you're getting consistent advice here that you choose to ignore. Maybe you can fix a lot of stuff, but you can't fix stupid. People here have experience. Why bother asking if you ignore what we all say?

    Go ahead, order a $400 bike from Bikes Direct. Let us all know how great it is.
    Sent from my Moto G (4) using Tapatalk

  14. #39
    pmf
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    Quote Originally Posted by mcs001 View Post
    You know, I really wish I was born with bicycle knowledge like you.

    You really need to go f u c k. Yourself...

    Sent from my Moto G (4) using Tapatalk
    You're not born with knowledge, you gain it over time. I've been riding road bikes most of my life. I ride 4000-5000 miles per year and have been doing so for decades. Yet I still learn new things about it. Like last week, I was riding my steel Colnago home from work and the rear wheel just wouldn't stay centered no matter how hard I cranked the old style Campy skewer. I dropped by the bike shop and one of the mechanics that I know there offered to look at it. He said hard chrome on these skewers can be slippery when completely dry, and put some lube on the lever near the cam. It seems to work since the wheel has stayed centered.

    Had I known about that I could have easily done it myself. Point is, I didn't know about it. Any light bulbs going off yet?

  15. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by pmf View Post
    You're not born with knowledge, you gain it over time. I've been riding road bikes most of my life. I ride 4000-5000 miles per year and have been doing so for decades. Yet I still learn new things about it. Like last week, I was riding my steel Colnago home from work and the rear wheel just wouldn't stay centered no matter how hard I cranked the old style Campy skewer. I dropped by the bike shop and one of the mechanics that I know there offered to look at it. He said hard chrome on these skewers can be slippery when completely dry, and put some lube on the lever near the cam. It seems to work since the wheel has stayed centered.

    Had I known about that I could have easily done it myself. Point is, I didn't know about it. Any light bulbs going off yet?
    Did I ever say I didn't want to learn ? That was why I asked honest questions here and you jumped in with your attitude.

    Do you know how to f u c k yourself? Let me know and I'll help you. F u c k off, will you?

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  16. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by mcs001 View Post
    Did I ever say I didn't want to learn ? That was why I asked honest questions here and you jumped in with your attitude.

    Do you know how to f u c k yourself? Let me know and I'll help you. F u c k off, will you?

    Sent from my Moto G (4) using Tapatalk
    Ah, the quest for knowledge, and such original sentiment . Thanks for the amusement. Can you tell me just one more time? Please please! Bahhahahahaha

  17. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by mcs001 View Post
    Did I ever say I didn't want to learn ? That was why I asked honest questions here and you jumped in with your attitude.

    Do you know how to f u c k yourself? Let me know and I'll help you. F u c k off, will you?

    Sent from my Moto G (4) using Tapatalk
    To be fair, pmf is raising some good points. Trouble is, he's being nasty about it and you're taking the bait and racing him to the bottom.

    Take the good with the bad. It gets rough in here sometimes. Put on your Nomex underwear and it won't hurt as much when you get lit up. And you will learn something in the process.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  18. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    To be fair, pmf is raising some good points. Trouble is, he's being nasty about it and you're taking the bait and racing him to the bottom.

    Take the good with the bad. It gets rough in here sometimes. Put on your Nomex underwear and it won't hurt as much when you get lit up. And you will learn something in the process.
    I know. There are always these know-it-all in all forums. I have been around since the bbs days so I know how it works. They always thought they know everything.

    Sent from my Moto G (4) using Tapatalk

  19. #44
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    I'm not taking any more of a nasty tone that what the OP responded to your stem comment above. There's nothing wrong with being ignorant, which he most certainly is. I guess its the typical beginner who thinks he knows everything (e.g., I don't need no stinkin bike shop). If you haven't ridden a bike in 30 years, go visit a bike shop is my bottom line. Now when the only response he can think of is go 'f' yourself, then the gloves come off.

    And do you really need to search out other threads I've started and make disparaging comments about my wife? Or the vacation pictures I posted on the commute/touring section? That's just mental midgetry. Go take a long nap under your bridge.

  20. #45
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    No I'm not going away. So live with it.

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  21. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by pmf View Post
    And do you really need to search out other threads I've started and make disparaging comments about my wife? Or the vacation pictures I posted on the commute/touring section? That's just mental midgetry. Go take a long nap under your bridge.
    If this is the case, it's inexcusable. He certainly has won the race to the bottom and should be negative repped. Family members are off limits when it comes to insults.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  22. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by mcs001 View Post
    No I'm not going away. So live with it.

    Sent from my Moto G (4) using Tapatalk
    Considering how many people have flagged you for harassment, you'll be gone by midnight. But, thanks, you're now in contention for the coveted " Troll of the Year" award.....
    "L'enfer, c'est les autres"

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