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  1. #1
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    Buying tomorrow, help decide between '11 Fuji SL1 Comp vs. '10 Fuji Roubaix 2.0

    I test rode both the SL1 and the acr 2.0 and quite liked them both. Performance is offering some good deals on them and offer 20% store credit back on Fuji's right now. This will be my first road bike and can't decide if it's worth springing more for the CF frame. Any input from people that own either or can help me decide which one of the two is the best bang for the buck would be great. The weight difference didn't seem to be very much, probably less than a pound. I don't have enough seat time to really tell the difference between CF and aluminum in a road bike. Here are links to both bikes. Thanks in advance!

    http://www.performancebike.com/bikes...20000__1598509

    http://www.performancebike.com/bikes..._20000_1598509

  2. #2
    Cycling induced anoesis
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    After intended use, IMO frame material/ specs are secondary to fit. That said, the geometry of these two bikes differs enough that (I think) fit will as well, so if you're still unsure test ride both again (back to back), then decide.

  3. #3
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    Though I'm not experienced enough to go too much into comparing the two, I can give some general advice from a fellow newbie's perspective.

    I bought a good aluminum bike about a month ago (Specialized Secteur Elite). At the time, I wasn't sure how much I would be riding, or if I might even decide after a week or two that this activity just wasn't for me. Turns out I love it, and am riding a lot more often (and for longer distances) than I expected.

    On the one hand, it's easy to say now that if I could go back in time, I would have spent the extra money on a carbon bike. True, at this phase part of me does wish I had bought a Roubaix.

    But at the same time I don't think there's any way I would have felt comfortable spending $3K, given that I had no experience with these kinds of bike to even know what I really wanted.

    Fortunately, I did at least come to the realization that spending a little more money to get the Apex-equipped bike (over the Tiagra/Sora base model) was a good idea, even though it meant spending $400 more than I had planned. As a result, I have a bike that I'm happy with, and can happily until I eventually decide to upgrade (if I had bought the base model, I suspect I'd have a lot more regret now).

    Like you, without the benefit of experience to be able to immediately and definitively home in on what I liked / didn't like about each bike and to put a dollar value on it, I kinda had to just go with my gut feeling. I could sense that the Apex-equipped bike shifted better than the Tiagra/Sora, and the hoods felt more comfortable to me as well. So even though it was hard to quantify the cost/benefit ratio of these differences, I decided that for the relatively small difference in price between the two, it was worth it to have a bike I'd be happier with.

    In your case, it looks like it might be a bit more complicated. Seems like it might be an example of good aluminum bike vs. lesser carbon bike. Glancing through the specs, even though both have Shimano 105, it looks like the aluminum bike has other components that might be a bit better… brakes, wheels, crankset.

    Anyway, in the absence of more concrete advice, I would suggest you ride both and simply see which one feels better (considering the smoothness of the ride, handling qualities, braking, shifting, etc.) and if you can't tell a big difference between the two, make the decision based on instinct.

    --Michael

  4. #4
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    Thanks for the help guys, I ended up getting the carbon SL comp for $1190 before tax at their new store's grand opening. This purchase also netted me $200+ in store credit, so I think I made out pretty well. I liked both bikes, and talked with different people both working there and cyclists stopping in and many of them thought the SL was more fitting for me. Just went out on my first quick ride and it is definitely faster than my mountain bike, especially up hills!

  5. #5
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    I have the acr 2.0 and love it. I'm coming up on 1000 miles on it with no issues other the ruining the rims on a pothole. This is my first road bike so I didn't know what I wanted and still don't know alot about fit even though I did have a basic fit done. For me the bike feels great though. The carbon stays are nice, but I do now find myself lusting after a lightweight full carbon. Fuji bikes are nice but make sure the one you pick has the right geometry for you.

    Only major difference is bb30 on the acr and it has 105 brakes component wise.

  6. #6
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    Does anyone know enough about the components on the sl1 comp to know where the most weight could be saved? I am guessing the ALX200 wheels are not that great but I can't seem to find a weight published for them, or even listed on a manufacturers website. I'd like to use some of the kick back money from performance to upgrade it a little if there are any certain spots that could really use it.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by ptadam22
    Does anyone know enough about the components on the sl1 comp to know where the most weight could be saved? I am guessing the ALX200 wheels are not that great but I can't seem to find a weight published for them, or even listed on a manufacturers website. I'd like to use some of the kick back money from performance to upgrade it a little if there are any certain spots that could really use it.
    With most bikes, upgrading the wheelset nets the biggest weight loss. But I suggest riding the bike 'as is' for awhile, otherwise when you upgrade you won't get a sense for any improvement.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by PJ352
    With most bikes, upgrading the wheelset nets the biggest weight loss. But I suggest riding the bike 'as is' for awhile, otherwise when you upgrade you won't get a sense for any improvement.
    Thanks for the advice. Due to work/weather/light I have only been able to put on ~15 miles, but I love it so far.

    -I don't want to get obsessed with weight, but is 20 lbs for this level of bike normal?
    -Can anyone suggest some items I should get to make my road bike experience that much better? So far I only have a jersey, will be getting some shorts/ new helmet soon.
    -Is it worth upgrading to road shoes and pedals when I have Crank Bros Candy pedals and decent shimano mtn shoes?

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by ptadam22
    Thanks for the advice. Due to work/weather/light I have only been able to put on ~15 miles, but I love it so far.

    -I don't want to get obsessed with weight, but is 20 lbs for this level of bike normal?
    -Can anyone suggest some items I should get to make my road bike experience that much better? So far I only have a jersey, will be getting some shorts/ new helmet soon.
    -Is it worth upgrading to road shoes and pedals when I have Crank Bros Candy pedals and decent shimano mtn shoes?
    20 lbs. for a bike in this price range is pretty good. That aside, you're right to not obsess over this. Fact of the matter is, if most of us shed some weight off our bodes we'd be stronger/ faster riders, so concentrate on building saddle time and with it strength/ endurance.

    Not knowing what you have already, I'd offer to get that new helmet sooner rather than later (if needed) and padded shorts will be a definite plus. Also, a saddle bag, patch kit, spare tube, tire levers, multi tool, pump (and/ or CO2) along with bottle cages/ bottles. Gel gloves quell road vibrations and add a layer of protection, so worth considering, IMO.

    If your current pedals/ shoes are working for you, stay with them. No need to fix what isn't 'broken'.

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