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  1. #351
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    Wish I would have read some of this before making my first purchase. I did some homework before I bought the bike off of Ebay. Hopefully I got a good deal >.<

  2. #352
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    Quote Originally Posted by jaewannabe View Post
    i'm a newbie who wants to get my first real road bike and am looking for some help. i'm a clyde, 6'4" 240ish, and am always breaking bikes and bike parts. i would like to say that my budget would allow myself to purchase a new bike but it won't so i'm looking at diving in with a used bike.

    i don't ever plan on racing or doing any centuries but would like to have a decent bike for hill climbing and local group rides. my main purpose of a road bike is exercise, i'm getting too old to run, 1 hour rides during the week with maybe a longer one occasionally.
    Have you considered getting a mail-order bike from Bikesdirect.com? On your budget, you can get quite a nice bike there. CL is iffy at best- depending on where you live. Some people get great deals...but unless you live in a very big city, the chances of fidning a good bike at a reasonable price and IN YOUR SIZE, are like finding a needle in a haystack.

    With Bikesdirect, if you are willing to do a little leg-work (using an on-line fitment calculator and taking measurements- and reading the BD sizing charts), and can do minimal assembly/adjustment of the bike...you'll get a great deal.

    I was in the same position you are in- a clyde, looking for an entry level bike to get my feet wet, and the local CL sucks, as I live in a rural area with few cyclists- I bought a $300 bike from BD- all aluminum- 25 lbs.( Road Bikes, Roadbikes - Mercier Galaxy AL ) -and I couldn't be happier with it. It's pretty much identical to a $700 Fuji. The bike is holding up great for me (currently down to 208 lbs- but was 220 when I started) on these rural roads....including some use on chip-seal/gravel/dirt....and once i assembled it and adjusted it when I first got it, I haven't had to touch it since. IMO, BD offers the best value for one's money...and is the only option for getting a decent NEW bike cheaply.

    [I am not connected with BD in any way...just a very satisfied customer- and next year when I am ready for a "good bike", I will be buying it from them (Got my eye on a couple of Motobecane LeChampions and Centuries already!)]

  3. #353
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    Getting ready buy my first road bike, have been looking at the DB Podium 3. What do you guys think about this bike?

  4. #354
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    Quote Originally Posted by bgmiller View Post
    Getting ready buy my first road bike, have been looking at the DB Podium 3. What do you guys think about this bike?
    Never rode one, but the specs on the Podium are very good, especially for a first time buyer. Save for the brakes and crankset, full Shimano 105.

    Beyond the specs, make sure the bike fits and rides/ handles the way you like. The geometry is pretty consistent with race bikes, so being a first bike you'll have an acclimation period to become accustomed to the road riding position and the way the bike handles, but sizing and fit still come first.

    On that topic, you don't say where you'd be purchasing from, but I recommend first being sized at a reputable LBS, even if you plan on purchasing elsewhere. There may be a nominal fee, but this method betters the odds of getting sizing right, because IME those charts and calculators do more to mislead and confuse than assist. Speaking of which, according to the DB sizing chart, I'd ride a M (54) and that's not correct, so proceed with caution...

  5. #355
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    Budget isnt a huge issue but i am currently stationed in Japan so a LBS fitting isnt going to be the easiest thing to find out here. I am going to a different base this weekend that has lots of road bikes for sale so i can test someout. PJ i am about 5' 11" with a 32 inseam if that would help with sizing.

  6. #356
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    Budget isnt a huge issue but i am currently stationed in Japan so a LBS fitting isnt going to be the easiest thing to find out here. I am going to a different base this weekend that has lots of road bikes for sale so i can test someout. PJ i am about 5' 11" with a 32 inseam if that would help with sizing.

  7. #357
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    Quote Originally Posted by bgmiller View Post
    Budget isnt a huge issue but i am currently stationed in Japan so a LBS fitting isnt going to be the easiest thing to find out here. I am going to a different base this weekend that has lots of road bikes for sale so i can test someout. PJ i am about 5' 11" with a 32 inseam if that would help with sizing.
    A lot of it is also torso and arms. Not just legs but you have to be comfortable leaning over the handlebars.

  8. #358
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    Quote Originally Posted by bgmiller View Post
    Budget isnt a huge issue but i am currently stationed in Japan so a LBS fitting isnt going to be the easiest thing to find out here. I am going to a different base this weekend that has lots of road bikes for sale so i can test someout. PJ i am about 5' 11" with a 32 inseam if that would help with sizing.
    As NJBiker mentioned, proportions, fitness and flexibility (among other factors) matter in sizing. I've seen riders your height riding 52cm's thru ~56's, so I think your best bet is to wait till you get to that base and test ride some bikes.

    If you're settled on the DB Podium, once you find that test bike that you're comfortable with, note the year, make, model and frame size, then compare its geometry to the Podiums. The closer the numbers, the closer fit will be to that of the test bike. At that point, if you have any questions/ concerns, either update this thread or start a new one and we can assist.

    Just as a FYI, not to confuse, but be aware that you can't just compare different brands/ models using frame size alone. In some brands/ models I'd go with a 47, in others a 54, so (as stated) once a baseline is established, let the geo numbers be your guide.

    HTH's and stay safe, wherever you are...

  9. #359
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    Here is a good bike size calculator, BGMiller:

    Fit Calculator - Competitive Cyclist

    This one is very thorough, and is probably more thorough than half the LBS's out there (A lot of LBS's only give a very nominal fitting...or just plain don't know what they're doing)

  10. #360
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    Quote Originally Posted by SolitaryRider View Post
    Here is a good bike size calculator, BGMiller:

    Fit Calculator - Competitive Cyclist

    This one is very thorough, and is probably more thorough than half the LBS's out there (A lot of LBS's only give a very nominal fitting...or just plain don't know what they're doing)
    LBS's (or any other business, for that matter) that don't know what they're doing aren't reputable and shouldn't be patronized. But fact is, many shops offer a standard fitting with bike purchases, and that suffices for most people just getting into road riding.

    IMO, the problem with online calculators is that they only 'know' the values inputted. And even when that's done correctly, the best they'll do is offer a range of fit parameters that generally fall within two frame sizes, serving to confuse rather than pin down sizing requirements, leaving the buyer to (still) guess at a frame size.

    Conversely, a knowledgeable fitter working one on one with a cyclist, discussing their cycling background, fitness, flexibility, anatomical issues (if any) and (once sized) seeing them positioned on a bike before and after test rides (tweaking fit as needed) IME is a far superior method.

    While I'm sure being stationed in Japan poses some unique challenges, since the Japanese ride bikes and have bike shops, the option to be fit should be available, and that would be my suggested method.

  11. #361
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    Quote Originally Posted by PJ352 View Post

    IMO, the problem with online calculators is that they only 'know' the values inputted. And even when that's done correctly, the best they'll do is offer a range of fit parameters that generally fall within two frame sizes, serving to confuse rather than pin down sizing requirements, leaving the buyer to (still) guess at a frame size.
    That is very true- especially if you happen to be right on the cusp between two sizes. In my case, between the calculator's recommendation and the sizing chart on the website I bought from both pretty much putting me at the same size, I figured I stood a good chance of getting a good fit- and I did indeed get a bike that fits like a glove- but I was cognizant of the fact that that might not have been the case- and was prepared to possibly have to return or sell the first bike.

    I'd say between that calculator and the seller's/manufacturer's sizing chart, one stands a pretty good chance of getting a correct fit, with a little care- and I'd say, if uncertain or right on the cusp between two sizes, go with the smaller one- and I'd imagine in 95% of the cases, it'll work out just fine. Agree?

  12. #362
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    Thanks for all the advise spoke with one of the guys I work with, his wife is Japanese he said she would go with me to a bike shop to get a fitting done. Not dead set on the Podium I have ridden the DB MTB for a long time and really liked them. The base I am going to this weekend have Cannondale, and from what I hear some Felt bikes so I am going to look at those also.

  13. #363
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    Quote Originally Posted by SolitaryRider View Post
    I'd say between that calculator and the seller's/manufacturer's sizing chart, one stands a pretty good chance of getting a correct fit, with a little care- and I'd say, if uncertain or right on the cusp between two sizes, go with the smaller one- and I'd imagine in 95% of the cases, it'll work out just fine. Agree?
    I really can't agree with you on that. Because 1) I seldom see two frame sizes working equally well for a rider, due to differences in reach and bar drop, 2) by providing the user with a range of sizes, I see an inherent 'flaw' in those calculators, so I can't see where using them as a 'baseline' (more accurately a vague baseline, given the ranges offered) together with what I see as an inaccurate sizing chart will result in a buyer making a reliable sizing decision.

    I'll agree that they may get lucky, but (as you say) it's best to be prepared to either return the bike for another size (up or down, depending on fit) or resell. The really sad scenario is when a well intentioned noob gives up on the sport because it hurts to ride, so IMO anything that betters the odds of getting sizing and fit right is worthwhile.

  14. #364
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    Quote Originally Posted by bgmiller View Post
    Thanks for all the advise spoke with one of the guys I work with, his wife is Japanese he said she would go with me to a bike shop to get a fitting done. Not dead set on the Podium I have ridden the DB MTB for a long time and really liked them. The base I am going to this weekend have Cannondale, and from what I hear some Felt bikes so I am going to look at those also.
    That's a good plan. C'dale and Felt are both top name brands, but DB has a good rep as well.

    When you're test riding the bikes, keep in mind that pinning down sizing requirements comes before fit, so the better the bike feels 'out of the box' (as we say) the better the fitting will go. Hopefully there will be company reps (or similar) available to assist.

    And if you decide on the DB, you can still revert back to my post comparing the geo of a well fitting test bike with the DB's.

  15. #365
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    Hi I am just starting my research for a new bike, first road bike in a very long time. Been riding an old Mountain bike but it is not as comforable to ride on the road nor as pleasent so I don't ride it. So my budget is about 1500-2000 cdn. At this time most of my riding will be to first get back into shape. I have lost 35 lbs so far but need to loose another 20-30 more lbs before I am happen. Eventually I want to start doing longer rides working my way up to some century rides.

    The I have checked out the bikes at the local LBS to see what is available, one sells Giants only, they have either the Defy Composite or the TCR Composite in my price range right now, they have some specials on. The other store sells Specialized, Cannondale or Trek. If the weather allows I hope to take a couple out for a test ride in the coming weeks. My question is for endurance riding and to get into shape what models should I look at? I have been doing some research but want to get opinions on what bikes to look at to narrow down my options some.

  16. #366
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    Quote Originally Posted by tazzmacd View Post
    Hi I am just starting my research for a new bike, first road bike in a very long time. Been riding an old Mountain bike but it is not as comforable to ride on the road nor as pleasent so I don't ride it. So my budget is about 1500-2000 cdn. At this time most of my riding will be to first get back into shape. I have lost 35 lbs so far but need to loose another 20-30 more lbs before I am happen. Eventually I want to start doing longer rides working my way up to some century rides.

    The I have checked out the bikes at the local LBS to see what is available, one sells Giants only, they have either the Defy Composite or the TCR Composite in my price range right now, they have some specials on. The other store sells Specialized, Cannondale or Trek. If the weather allows I hope to take a couple out for a test ride in the coming weeks. My question is for endurance riding and to get into shape what models should I look at? I have been doing some research but want to get opinions on what bikes to look at to narrow down my options some.
    Since you mentioned both the Giant Defy and TCR, along with longer term goals of endurance rides, I suggest considering both relaxed and race models in the brands available to you.

    Generally speaking, race geo bikes have a shorter wheelbase for quicker handling/ steering and shorter head tubes, allowing for a more aggressive rider position. Conversely, relaxed geo bikes have slightly longer wheelbases for more predictable handling and taller head tubes for a more upright riding position. In real world riding conditions the differences are fairly subtle, but I suggest test riding both, then deciding which you prefer.

    Being in the US, I'm not all that familiar with pricing up your way, so I'll suggest some models in the brands you list that should be close to your price range. I've categorized them (race/ relaxed), but not by groupset. Both SRAM and Shimano have their fans, so (as I summarize below), test ride and decide which you prefer.

    In no particular order:
    Trek 2.1 - with taller head tubes and higher trail, I'd say this bike leans towards relaxed, but has a shorter wheelbase which splits the difference.

    Specialized Secteur - Modeled after their Roubaix, this is a relaxed geo bike.

    Specialized Allez - Modeled after their Tarmac, this is a race geo bike.

    Giant TCR - Similar to the Trek, it has a somewhat taller head tube, but IMO leans towards race.

    Giant Defy - Relaxed geo.

    Cannondale CAAD 8 - Except for the slightly taller head tube, has race geo.

    Cannondale Synapse - Geo close to that of the Specialized Roubaix/ Secteur, a relaxed geo bike.

    IMO the best way to whittle your choices is to visit the LBS's, get sized/ fitted and head out on the roads for test rides. Focus on fit/ feel, ride and handling, SRAM /Shimano control placement/ operation and decide from there. It helps to ask the LBS's to check tire pressures and (as near as possible) equalize them so that differences don't influence your decision.

    Lastly, discuss you fitness goals and the terrain you'll be riding with the LBS's. Most bikes in this category come equipped with compact (50/34) cranksets, but some also offer triples - and rear gearing varies as well. Given that you're looking to do longer rides (and even if you weren't), you'll want gearing tailored to your needs.

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    Thanks for the reply, that is exactly what I was hoping for. Gives me an idea on where to start and what to look at.

    Now the fun begins, really looking forward to getting back into it. I told my wife I will no wbe one of the guys on the road to our house that she curses at. Her reply, I won't run you off the road, at least I will try.....Love ya Honey.

    At least she will try .

  18. #368
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    ha

    Quote Originally Posted by MB1 View Post
    OTOH I have worked in all parts of the industry for more than 30 years (just 1 day a week now ).

    Old joke; "Tony, do you know how to make a small fortune in the bike business?"

    "Sure Mark, start with a large fortune."


    Truth hurts.
    LOL, I can tell you and I would get along if you were my mechanic

  19. #369
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    Looking to Switch from Running to Biking- Ideas?

    I've biked recreationally, but since I got a stress fracture running, I've been think about toning down my running and beginning to bike more, and I am looking to my first road bike. My biker friends insist that Treks are way over priced, but I've ridden a friends 1.2 and liked it a lot. What do you guys think about the Trek 1.2 vs the Scott Speedster s50 and the Cannondale Synapse Sora as far as good beginner bikes? Any ideas? Thanks

  20. #370
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    Quote Originally Posted by caspian View Post
    I've biked recreationally, but since I got a stress fracture running, I've been think about toning down my running and beginning to bike more, and I am looking to my first road bike. My biker friends insist that Treks are way over priced, but I've ridden a friends 1.2 and liked it a lot. What do you guys think about the Trek 1.2 vs the Scott Speedster s50 and the Cannondale Synapse Sora as far as good beginner bikes? Any ideas? Thanks
    At the upper end of their range, I'm not a huge Trek fan, but in your price range I think the 1 and 2 series bikes are fine choices.

    That said, a bike has to meet two requirements; one being that it'll suite your intended purposes, the other - suiting your anatomy (as in, fit). My standard advice; visit some shops, get sized./ fitted to the bikes of interest and head out (on the roads and for some duration) for some test rides. Focus on fit/ feel, ride and handling, along with control placement and function. Beforehand, based on tire size, road conditions and total rider weight, ask the shop to check tire pressures. To some extent, this will equalize the differences in ride qualities of the bikes.

    Just as a FYI, during test rides, IMO/E it's best to focus more on the fit, ride and handling aspects, because if a bike shifts less than optimally off the shops floor, it's likely a small/ minor adjustment, so don't walk away from a perfectly fine bike on that basis alone.

    Re: the geo of the bikes, the Trek and Scott are more similar than different, with the Scott leaning slightly more towards race geo, but the differences are minor. The C'dale falls into the relaxed geo category, which means the bike will handle slightly slower (some call it predictable) and the taller head tube puts the rider in a slightly more upright position compared to the Trek or Scott. If I had to further categorize them, I'd say the Scott is the most aggressive, the Trek follows and the Synapse is the relaxed choice. So, ride and decide which you prefer, keeping in mind that adjustments to stem/ spacers can (to a point) alter saddle to bar drop.

    Re: the specs, the C'dale and Trek are similar in that they basically offer Sora's 9 speed drive train. The C'dale offers a triple crankset while the Trek uses a compact. The Scott uses Shimano's 2300 drive train which is a step below Sora and 8 speed. Like the C'dale, that bike is spec'd with a triple.

    Best thing to do re: gearing is to discuss your fitness and the terrain you'll be riding with your LBS. You said you've dome some recreational riding, so those experiences might help you decide which option might work best for you.

    FWIW, there are some other makes/ models that might be worth a look. If you're interested, post other offerings at your LBS's and we'll advise further.

  21. #371
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    I would suggest an old steel bike. I purchased my first complete vintage bike on ebay and love it. I bought on 84 trek 520. These older bikes are solid and usually have room for fenders, eyelets for racks and they're so much more stylish than a new bike

  22. #372
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    I'm kind of in this same boat. Hopefully I'll be able to make a decent decision - although I'm on a killer budget...

  23. #373
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    wow really great advice here

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    Hi Everyone, This is a GREAT thread I am a mountain biker (Giant Yukon hard tail) from MBTR.com and have been doing more street riding than trail as of late and I want to purchase a road bike So I told my self I would take 2 weeks researching, riding asking questions, visiting as many LBS's as possible. And snooping Here LOL
    I have been doing my due dillegence in researching my 1st New entry level road bike(under 1000 bucks) and have been to all the local shops here in San Diego(Escondido) and it really does seem to be comparing apples and apples.......
    so, I need a little help
    1. Giant Defy 5 2012 al frame, Al fork, shimano Sora derailer 699.00 but I can it for 650.00
    test rode it felt good, good accel but a bit on the heavy side.
    2. the Fuji 3.0 2011 roubiex al frame, Carbon fork, Shimano Sora 599.00( I think it was) rode it felt good too very responsive smooth shifting very comfortable. 949 was the origanl price bTW
    3.Specialized Sectuer 2011 al frame, carbon fork Shimano tiagra 847.00 rode it very comfortable smooth shifting but a few hundy more to the price.
    So i guess out of these three.......Im leaning twards the Specialized Sectuer but its out of my self imposed budget
    BUT I liked the Fuji smooth shifting, comfortable and the price point was nice too
    Is the Specialized that much better of a bike than Fuji?
    And also I was thinking would it be better to get the Specialized Allez 2200 2300Shimano which really bottom of the barrel from what I understand. if thats what most people end up getting anyway?
    Sorry for such a long post. Thanks K

  25. #375
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    A great source of info for newbie like me.

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