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  1. #26
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    what are the real tradeoffs in going cheaper

    I don't have the answers...just hoping someone will post a response...

    I know the shimano spec line; i.e. ultegra, 105, tiagra, sora...but what does it really mean for a newbie? Went looking for a road bike for my wife last night and, at one shop, seemed like the entry level option they wanted to offer was the Trek 1500 for around $1200 or so. Another shop had a Raleigh Supercourse for 999. The Raleigh has 105 chainring and ultegra cassette. It seems a good deal. But I've already bought into this whole name-game of quality and I don't really know what it means for my wife. (In fairness to the first shop, I started off by saying I wanted a 105 component bike; second shop, I said budget 600-1000.)

    We got home and had the "Why should anyone have to pay $1000 for a bike?" conversation. I don't want to pressure her into getting the 105/Ultegra bike, but I also don't want to "cheap out" and get some clunky thing that constantly needs adjustment and is a POS.

    So, what really matters; i.e. what does 105 buy you over Tiagra or something else?

    Is it component weight? That doesn't matter for our purposes.

    Is it durability? OK, but does that mean the parts last longer (not so relevent if you plan to ride 1000 miles a year) or does it mean the parts need a lot of adjustment and tweaking to keep the shifting smooth? I don't want to have my wife riding a bike that I have to do maintenence on every week before we go for a ride.

    It helps to start with a budget, I know, and our budget was essentially "under 1000." So, big suprise, we found a bike for $999. But now I am thinking our budget should really be more like $600. So, once you go there, what exactly are the tradeoffs?

  2. #27
    gazing from the shadows
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    Quote Originally Posted by NeedhamDave
    I don't have the answers...just hoping someone will post a response...

    The short answer that I usually give is that 105 will keep you happy if you become a "serious" cyclist, lower levels may not. 105 will shift a bit better, feel a bit nicer, and work overall slightly better. 105 is usually considered the lowest "raceable" level.

    I am a serious cyclist in that I ride road, mtb, and commute, and to be honest I bought a road bike with lower than 105 and it works fine for me. (campy mirage, not shimano, but the quality jumps are similar.) On the trail with MTB components I think it makes a lot more difference, on the road, not so much. With my mirage components, the biggest thing I dislike is the plastic shift levers. I wish they were metal. But this is the second year, and it doesn't take much to keep it running and shifting smooth. Other than an issue with the rear wheel, but my wife has the same wheels and her's has had no problems. I'm just hard on rear wheels.

    Our bikes work fine. And for 1000 miles a year, the 600-800 range bikes will get you 3 years before you have to replace anything other than maybe tires. You can easily get many, many more years out of them without doing more than routine things like chain, bottom bracket, and hubs.

    You might regret it, but only if you go out and feel up or ride more expensive bikes.

    That being said, I suggest you take your wife out and have her ride the bikes at the price points. Then let her decide. If she can't tell the difference, don't pay the money. If she can, and cares about the difference, spend it. If she is happy, she will be more likely to ride it.
    .
    Stout beers under trees, please.

  3. #28
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    Maybe getting a used but good condition bicycle will save you some $$$
    got great deals on ebay(watch out for scams) and in selling ads(iwanta) got me a bianchi eros 2002 bought for 400, retail new $1100 (around 600 on ebay) and the guy included a shirt ($50), pants, shimano shoes($99),cannondale gloves (25),computer,some more colthing and a crappy helmet...it was a steal

  4. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by dr hoo
    This is a thread to advise people on buying their first road bike on a budget... no matter what that budget is. Post some advice that would be useful for people when they are starting the process. Post criteria for deciding between two bikes. Post anything you think EVERY first time road bike buyer should know before plunking down her or his cash and taking the leap.
    Read some reviews and ride all the bikes! I think the winner in the Bicycling mag beginner bike comparo was the Trek 1000, if you want a less agressive bike but won't want to ride a Pilot (who does), try the Lemond Etape. Same bike as the Trek, but less aggressive riding position.

  5. #30
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    I don't want to debate the merits and pitfalls of online sales. I do want, to, however, point out some factors that a new person interested in getting a bike should think about. Although a bike is mechanically simple, not everyone wants to fix their own bike. I even know some experienced road people that take a flat to an LBS to fix. Unless you have had some experience with adjusting a bike for proper shifting and such, the empirical approach can get things really screwed up. Leaving a stem too loose, or trying to force the left pedal on in the wrong direction can cross-thread and ruin a crank. A new person would not have the experience in inspection to see if a bike had a safety flaw in it.

    At a bike shop where you find conscientious personnel you benefit from their experience. Bike shops do vary so it does take some due diligence on a person to visit different shops to find the better ones. Some people don't have the choices a person living in a metropolitan area would have. Any adjustment problems a new bike may have can be fixed by the shop for free. A bike bought off E-Bay can be taken to a shop for adjustment, but it will cost extra and labor rates may be steeper than a person would think is fair.

    A new bike has a warranty. Flaws happen, that's life. At least with a major brand bought at a local bike shop you can get it fixed or replaced.

    All new bikes have cable stretch. Gears and brakes go out of adjustment. All shops offer a free tune-up of a new bike for the first six months or a year.

    Do understand that there are good $650 bikes in local bike shops. They will try to up-sell you so you, as a consumer, must stick to your guns. A good salesman knows when to back off.

    Proper fit is more than adjusting seat setback and height. Especially with a new rider, most bikes have top tube lengths longer than optimum for them. Such is the market, most bikes have a racing geometry. For this reason a good bike shop will also change your stem and rise to get the handlebars higher than a racer would have it. Because people vary in fitness it's better to set a new rider with a more upright position than a racer would have.

    A person just getting into biking again after a long hiatus may need the help that only experience can give. When you aren't spending a lot of money, it makes more sense to rely on the experience of a good bike shop. There are good ones and bad ones out there, so look for a good one.

    If you are mechanically inclined, and obviously web-connected, there are a lot of online resources for wrenching a bike and for setting a bike up for proper fit. Do take the time to read up and research. Download and print out the manuals for the components on your bike. Check forums for issues with certain brands of components and typical set-up problems. If you don't know much about fit, find a good online fit calculator and have someone help measure you up. As long as you know the approximate size of frame that fits, you can dial one in that is slightly small or large. But then, again, because geometry varies, you don't know if you need slightly small or large until you ride enough to get a sense for that. So, the bottom line, as I see it, is that an inexperienced person is ill-advised to by a bike online to save money, the pitfalls are too numerous and deep.

  6. #31
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    I think there is a sensible middle ground between buying at the LBS and buying on eBay: buy a used bike locally, off craigslist or other local online classifieds, and then get it serviced at the LBS (possibly even the seller's LBS).

    Check the local listings daily for freebies, deals, and swaps, on bikes and on parts/accessories. It can pay off big, if you are patient and disciplined about when to pounce and when to pass.

    Unlike eBay: 1) you can try before you buy; 2) no shipping; 3) no scams.

    Saves a lot of money compared with buying at the LBS or even eBay. Bring the bike in for service and you still build an LBS relationship. Ask the seller where they bought and serviced the bike, and bring it back there.

    Most first-time bike buyers wonít be doing complex maintenance and repairs themselves right away, just the easier stuff at first.

    The biggest challenge in buying used is fit, but then thatís always an issue with a first bike. You learn what fits from how your first bike does not exactly. Then you do better selecting your 2nd bike.

    This strategy works great especially if you are willing to ride old stuff (which sounds better if you call it ďvintage steelĒ). It also helps if you have an LBS where they are into older bikes.

    Itís working for me, with help from Zinnís bike maintenance book and RBR.

  7. #32
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    Research is very important...

    I'm new to higher-end road bikes, but not to bikes in general. Lucky for me I learned how to build, adjust & maintain bikes from my Grandfather many years ago.

    Now I know most folks don't or won't have that type of background so here's my take.

    When I was an avid mtn bike rider from '87 to '94, I did lots of research before plunking down my hard earned cash for each ride as I progressed in that sport. Remember, this was before the www(dot)world. So what I did was go to the local bikes shops, ride the floor models & ask questions, lots of questions. A bike is just like any other purchase, it can be made on whim or it can be a careful exercise in comparisons. I picked up as many brochures as I could to compare apples to apples & apples to oranges, meaning bikes out of my price range both above & below. This way I could browse the bikes' specs at home without the pressure of commission driven sales folks telling what they "think" I should get.

    This is not to take away the expertise that can only be found by talking to an experienced & knowledgable professional, it's just removing the hard sell element by not being so focused or rushed on the "purchase." But if you find a bike that suits you right from the get go & fits the budget by all means consider buying it! Sometimes this works great.

    My latest purchase to replace my (now sold) 20-year old Trek 310 Elance road bike was through the web but I bought & picked it up locally. But again, I had a bike that I could reference back to for sizing & fit so I took my time & I checked the manufacturer's web sites to get the specs on the bikes I was looking at in cyberspace. I also read the many reviews posted here as well. All this paid huge dividends for me. I was able to get (& then fit) a nearly new $1,100 bike ('05 Felt F70) for less than $700! And the bike was originally listed for sale at $750. But by doing research, I learned a few important things that helped me with negotiating a better deal. The price I paid ended up being almost 40% off the MSRP!

    Granted, this way may not be the best approach for a beginner to purchase their first bike, but if you do your homework by visiting the LBS, test riding bikes that interest you & by browsing online you can come up with the right bike, with the right specs for your intended use & you can be armed with the knowledge of what it should cost.

    Hope this helps...
    Keep Ridin'
    HC
    "It can't be the rider, it's gotta be the bike...yeah, that's it..."

  8. #33
    wannabike
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    Question Giant vs. Raleigh vs. Redline

    I've been looking at the specs for various bikes, and am trying to educate myself before I fork out the dough. Sorry for the length of this post, but I am a relative newbie when it comes to bikes (riding for 9 months) and I am getting totally hooked on it.

    I am looking for a good-weather commuter bike that also works on the road--I want to ride the 210-mile Seattle to Portland event in the summer. I ride 12-27 miles each way to work, and have several rolling hills with 10-15 degree grade. My LBS, which has been incredibly helpful with advice and freeby minor adjustments on my Trek 720 MultiTrack, carries Giant, Raleigh and Redline; I looked at Jake the Snake but can't handle the optic green.

    1. Carbon Fork. The Raleigh Rx 1.0 has a full carbon fork, while the Giant OCR 1 & 2, the Raleigh Cadent 2.0 and the Redline Conquest Pro have carbon with an aluminum steerer, and the Redline Conquest has an aluminum fork with disc tabs.

    I've read the thread about carbon forks and safety, but I cannot tell what the performance difference is and whether it is worth considering as a factor.

    2. All of the bikes have a Shimano 105 rear derailleur. As for the rest of the components, the Giant OCR 1and Redline Conquest Pro have primarily Shimano 105 while the others are primarily Shimano Tiagra with an occasional 105 thrown in.

    For my riding needs, is there enough of a difference between the Tiagra and 105 that I should spend the extra money?

    3. For commuting up and down hills (10-15 degree grade), how many chainrings would I need? The Giant OCR 1 & 2, and the Raleigh Cadent 2.0 have 3 chainrings, while the Raleigh Rx 1.0, and the Redline Conquest and Conquest Pro have only two. Since I tend to chicken out at around 35-40 mph downhill, I really need something suited for climbing hills and riding flats rather than for downhill speed.

    Would 2 chainrings be enough?
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Buying Your First Bike on a Budget.-photo.jpg  
    [FONT="Arial"][/FONT]seattlesyclist

  9. #34
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    seattlesyclist: This thread is a list of general advice. For specific advice on your situation, I suggest you start your own thread. That way we won't pollute this thread. See you soon in another thread.

  10. #35
    wannabike
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    Good suggestion. Will do.
    [FONT="Arial"][/FONT]seattlesyclist

  11. #36
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    Bought my first bike this week- a Newbies experience

    So, I was looking to up my fitness riding over burning my legs out in the first 20 minutes aboard my mountain bike and started the search for a road bike. There really was no aerobic work being done here and I have not been a hardcore rider. I was pushing a Haro V3 with street slicks, but, of course, the gearing wasn't made for high speeds on flattop. Thus began my inexperienced search for a road bike. I initially thought an urban/hybrid Marin would do the trick, but quickly found I might wish to go full on into road, so I researched other options.

    Initially I checked the LBS, but am always leery of answers from salesmen as well as inflated prices so I went to Ebay. Generally, I knew my frame size and was recommended initially to get a medium frame. I knew I could beat the LBS price through Ebay ( and I could have) but I was never sold on getting the fit right for myself. I looked at the Motobecane Record and an Ironhorse, each with decent(?) components, but in reading reviews noticed that there was some question about the Motobecane name and heritage and few reviews on Ironhorse. So, I started to research the preferred components and let that be my guide. It appeared that Sora was looked upon with disdain, but Tiagra is acceptable so I began there. I narrowed my search to Trek, Fuji and Giant (all offered by LBS's) given the reputation and commonality. I aimed for the Tiagra equipped OCR and Newest lines of bikes. I decided I was not knowledgeable enough to purchase through Ebay and ran the risk of quickly becoming upset with my choice due to my competitive spirit.

    I chose to go and see one of the LBS's I had visited. My second visit entailed good personal service to find the correct framesize. As I said, one of the LBS's put me in a medium, but my legs were fully extended from the seat to pedal when we tried an OCR 2. So we tried a small instead. Much more comfortable and surely the right decision had already been made about going to the LBS. At this point I made another appointment to tailor a fit and purchase the right bike. I changed my appt 3 times in single day, but the owner still met me at 7 AM on a Wednesday to fit me. We spent 1.5 hrs dialing in the shoes, seat heat and position, stem placement, etc. The owner had me ride in place for 15-20 minutes to ensure a 'temporary' proper fit as we tweaked here and there and practiced mount and dismount with the clips. Turns out he noticed a run of poor Shimano clips and replaced mine with better Cannondales (free) as my right shoe would not clip in. I purchased the expected amount of extra gear (tube, patches, inflater, tools, bottle cage, shoes, mid level computer) with a 10-15% discount from the owner. I began this search looking in the $500 range, but recognized that my taste, desire and research could better spend my money where I truly wanted it so I accepted a greater investment.

    I ended up purchasing a 2006 OCR 1 with the 105 suite stock. I was immediately impressed with the ride which was made sweeter by the riding plan the LBS owner prescribed for me. He encouraged me to evaluate some points on my bike as I rode and asked me to return after a few hundred miles to readjust the riding position as I gained confidence and experience. Good for business of course, but I felt like I was appreciated and not expected to figure out future adjustments on my own. In the end, I did spend more ($1300 total), but I feel I will reap the benefits as my riding progresses. I also got some decent discounts and feel assured I will receive the same personalized service with each visit. I also learned a few things about fit that I would have missed or gotten wrong by choosing Ebay. That's my experience.

  12. #37
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    I've just got into cycling about a year ago and have been using my mountain bike for most of my cycling needs. I'm thinking of upgrading to a good value road bike,but tossing up between trek 1000 or giant ocr 3? Any recomendations

  13. #38
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    My first Road Bike

    I finally bought my first road bike. I've been mountain biking for about six years, but ever since I moved to San Diego, CA I've been riding on the road more and more. I thought the only logical thing to do was to buy a road bike.
    A week ago last friday I bought a 2004 Trek 5000 in mint condition for $900.

    Do you think I got a good deal. I think I did, what do you think?

    Here are the Specs;

    FRAMESET:
    FRAME: OCLV 120 Carbon
    FORK: Carbon with alloy steerer

    WHEELS:
    WHEELS: Bontrager Race
    TIRES: Bontrager Race Lite, 700x23c

    DRIVETRAIN:
    SHIFTERS: Shimano Ultegra
    FRONT DERAILLEUR: Shimano 105
    REAR DERAILLEUR: Shimano Ultegra
    CRANKSET: Shimano Ultegra 53/39
    CASSETTE: Shimano HG-70 12-25, 9 speed
    PEDALS: N/A

    COMPONENTS:
    SADDLE: was upgraded, but I don't remember the brand.
    SEATPOST: Bontrager Race Carbon
    HANDLEBARS: Bontrager Race Lite
    STEM: Bontrager Race Lite, 31.8, 7 degree
    HEADSET: Cane Creek C-1
    BRAKESET: Shimano 105

  14. #39
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    My new first road bike

    I finally bought my first road bike. I've been mountain biking for about six years, but ever since I moved to San Diego, CA I've been riding on the road more and more. I thought the only logical thing to do was to buy a road bike.
    A week ago last friday I bought a 2004 Trek 5000 in mint condition for $900.

    Do you think I got a good deal. I think I did, what do you think?

    Here are the Specs;

    FRAMESET:
    FRAME: OCLV 120 Carbon
    FORK: Carbon with alloy steerer

    WHEELS:
    WHEELS: Bontrager Race
    TIRES: Bontrager Race Lite, 700x23c

    DRIVETRAIN:
    SHIFTERS: Shimano Ultegra
    FRONT DERAILLEUR: Shimano 105
    REAR DERAILLEUR: Shimano Ultegra
    CRANKSET: Shimano Ultegra 53/39
    CASSETTE: Shimano HG-70 12-25, 9 speed
    PEDALS: N/A

    COMPONENTS:
    SADDLE: was upgraded, but I don't remember the brand.
    SEATPOST: Bontrager Race Carbon
    HANDLEBARS: Bontrager Race Lite
    STEM: Bontrager Race Lite, 31.8, 7 degree
    HEADSET: Cane Creek C-1
    BRAKESET: Shimano 105

    Attachment 80565

  15. #40
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    Question LBS gone

    the LBS closed in my town, shortly after I bought my first "good bike" at a sporting goods store (cheap). I've been ashamed ever since. But mostly I miss the shop.My next bike will come from lbs in the next town and I hope for a better fit.

  16. #41
    Alx
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    Are roadies not that mechanically inclined? Why is adjusting your gears and brakes such a hard thing to do? It isn't and I think anyone who purchases a bike that requires you to do such things only helps you as a rider so you know exactly what every component does and its limit.
    I just purchased my first road bike as well, online from bikesdirect and I didn't spend the $600+ prices being quoted here to get a "good" beginner's bike. Its not really about how much you spend on your first bike but rather how well you take care of it.

  17. #42
    Visitor from the 80's
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    As a newbie going through the experience right now, I can tell you a few pitfalls I did not plan for:
    1. Too much "research" causing me to spend more than I originally expected, because after reading way too many reviews on this site and others you start adding to your budget, justifying the that you need 105 instead of Tiagra.

    2. Who knew helmets, shoes, shorts, gloves, socks, and a jersey would add up to another $200?? Not to mention that most new riders DO NOT LIKE those wierd narrow race seats that come standard even on budget wannabe racers - so that's another $50-70 to replace the seat, but a LBS will replace for free some of their in house items (mine did) if you like something of similar value better.

    3. Unlike internet sales where there are no return policies if "used", a LBS will normally give you a 1-2 week exchange policy if they didn't get the fit right (mine is giving me 60 days to try out as many sizes/models as I need to until they get it down).

    4. I originally intended to buy used on Ebay, then new from Ebay retailers, then used "top notch" brands on Ebay, and then I realized that I didn't have enough experience with geometry to project what I can expect from the handling of a bike just by looking at the dimensions of the bike. I'm not a young guy anymore, and the last thing I wanted to do was be stuck with a Cannondale racer that would shake my fillings loose when I wanted a long distance rider. The good news is if you want a racer, they are a dime a dozen as that appears to be the geometry du jour.

    My needs required the assistance of a helpful LBS, despite all my internet research and hope to save money.

  18. #43
    rkb
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    fifth time's a charm
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    Hello- Lots of good info, but what about the different types of road bikes (geo). I'm a mountain biker who has invested a fair amount in a bike (santa cruz) and I'm am getting the bug to hit the road. I am not scared of making an reasonable investment (2000-3000 clams), but where do I begin. It seems that in road biking as in mtn biking everyone has an opinion, whats the best ever for one is the biggest POS for another. I am not interested in racing a tri, just going out there and spinning for a few hours and not get hit by a car.

  19. #44
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    rkb,

    The best advice I can give, and this is what I learned over the last several months of hunting for my "perfect bike" in the $2k-3k range, is to go to as many LBS with the largest selection of bikes as possible. They will all give you test rides, and their personal favorites from their selected brands. The good news for you is that because you are not a serious racer, you don't need the cutting edge aggressive geometry to squeeze every last inch of performance out of your bike. You can go with a little more relaxed, but still fast, geometry, which appears to be trendy at the moment. Two of those types of bikes I've enjoyed testing have been: Bianchi 928 C2C and Specialized Roubaix. There are also small makers like Gunnar, Heron, Waterford and Rivendell who have similar models.

  20. #45
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    I want to start riding and i dont have the thousand bucks to get a bike from a shop... i dont know anything about what makes a good bike and what i should be looking for in a good bike... iv e been looking around and i found a Motobecane Super Mirage for $340 on ebay shipped, and the specs are:

    Frame is full Dura Forte Chrome Moly - including the sloping chrown fork ~ other specs are Aluminum quick release hubs, Alex Aluminum rims, 24-speed Shimano Sora der with Triple Alloy crank, Shimano Sora STI shifters (brakes and shifters built into the same lever ), Maxxis high pressure tires, M-wings aluminum handlebar & seatpost, with a great comfortable seat and Aluminum road pedals with Toe Clips and straps....

    is any of that good or is it bottom of the line crap, again i know nothing about biking but i want to get inot it so any input on this bike would be greatly appreciated

  21. #46
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    If your price range is sub-$500, then you at least need to be properly fitted to the right sized bike. Go to any number of online sites for a general idea of what bike "size" you are, and from there you can either get new "cheapo" or used 90's era but higher quality bike from Ebay/Craigslist.

    Refrain from buying a bike immediately (buyer's remorse) and spend a lot of time reading all the review and old posts on these and other bicycle forums to be informed about what sort of road bikes are out there, geometry, riding styles, and then you can be an informed buyer. It may take a few weeks, but it will be worth it in the end.

    Shimano Sora is indeed bottom of the line, but not necessarily "crap", however, if you are going to take this bike "racing" or serious group riding, then the Sora will not last very long. You would have to upgrade some of your drivetrain/shifting components to 105, and that alone costs $200-$300.

    But if all you're doing is looking for a good time on leisurely rides like the guys on beach cruisers, then you won't notice the lowe end componentry.

  22. #47
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    Here are my thoughts. I ride a lot. I bought my first 'good' mountain bike from a friend for a good price, and my first 'good' road bike from a store. I will say that after having been riding both for a while, the store one was a better buy. It just fits me a lot better.

    When I was at the store, the bike that was the proper size for my height felt too stretched out, so they switched out the stem and I was cooking. I also got a discount on a lot of accessories I needed.

    I have never bought a bike on Ebay, so I can't comment on that. I have bought a used bike on Craigslist, and I was pretty happy with it. That said, I still had problems with it (stuck stem, 27 inch tires versus 700c that I had laying around, etc).

    All that is to say, that for me, for the first bike, I'd buy from a store. Most stores have a 12 or 18 month free service plan, which is useful for the average rider. If only to try and fix the problems that you caused your self trying to take the bike apart (been there, done that!)
    I just finished a 6500km bike ride across Canada. I raised over $100 000 for kids with cancer. Read all about it: http://www.cyclingforcancer.ca

  23. #48
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    Newbie needs advice

    Okay, I know a lot of you dont like the ebay option from reading this thread, but I am just wanting to give this a try, if I like it, I may spend a lot of money on a bike later on. Right now I just want something to get me by. So let me know what you guys think of this bike on ebay. It is 199 plus 39 shipping, and im about 5'9". Thanks for the help.





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    DAWES LIGHTNING SPORT has a list price of $495 and I can sell them for just $199 plus $39 shipping in the Continental USA. {must be made for via PAYPAL - I have no other way to collect funds}

    FEATURES OF THIS BIKE ARE EXCELLENT:

    Full Chrome-moly Dura-Forte Frame and fork; with Alex Aluminum rims, Shimano 2200 14-speed der's with stem indexed shifters, Maxxis 130 PSI 700c tires, quick release wheels front and rear, aluminum alloy hubs, SHIMANOaluminum crank, Aluminum alloy pedals including toe clips with straps, aluminum stem, aluminum handlebar, aluminum seatpost, ProMax aluminum side-pull brakes and levers, plus a very nice Velo Road bike seat.

    THIS LISTING IS MEDIUM - 56cm MEASURED CENTER TO TOP - and RIDERS 5'8" TO 5'11" WOULD FEEL COMFORTABLE ON THIS SIZE [BUT I AM ALSO LISTING THE OTHER SIZES] STANDOVER HEIGHT IS 31 INCHES

    Please check my feedback - I am very quick to ship and like making customers happy.

    I am sorry the pictures are not better; but this is a very nice looking bike and rides really great.

    DO NOT BE FOOLED BY THE LOW PRICE! THIS IS A GREAT BIKE:: FUN - COMFORTABLE - FAST - and DURABLE. Nothing comes close at this price. . {this is great BIKE SHOP QUALITY BIKE - not a WalMart level bike!}

    Buyer pays the $39 shipping and handlingin the 48 connected states; and must pay with PAYPAL.

    I feel if you are just wanting to get started in road cycling, this bike is a great place to start. It is brand new and the color is SILVER or RED { PLEASE TELL ME WHICH COLOR YOU WANT WHEN YOU PAY}

  24. #49
    rkb
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    fifth time's a charm
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    Well all I did it- I just ordered a shiny new Bianchi 928 C2C Ultegra as my first roadbike. After spending most of my time dodging cedar trees and boulders on my Santa Cruz Heckler I am looking forward to going fast on the open road. RB review member SCWOLF recommended the 928 to me, I tested it out and fell in love. Thanks to everyone for their input.

  25. #50
    Alx
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    Quote Originally Posted by BLMcKee
    Okay, I know a lot of you dont like the ebay option from reading this thread, but I am just wanting to give this a try, if I like it, I may spend a lot of money on a bike later on. Right now I just want something to get me by. So let me know what you guys think of this bike on ebay. It is 199 plus 39 shipping, and im about 5'9". Thanks for the help.
    That looks like bikesdirect.com ebay listing. I bought my recent bike from them and couldn't be happier, the bike got shipped super-fast and its exactly what the description was. I know I didn't purchase a rare italian made bike but first off i'm new to the sport, second i'm not gonna race or enter any triathlons so it fits me just well, and also most of these manufacturers get their frames built in the same factories in Taiwan. The higher price just usually goes towards higher-end components and more established name brands.

    As far as durability in the sora components, that what my bike has and it shifts just as well as all the other high price bikes I looked at. I don't see how they won't last as long as the higher end components since they're usually installed on bikes that are gonna be used for recreational use anyways.

    If you're just starting get what you can afford now and ride it till the wheels fall off so to speak. If you ride so many miles that you wear it out then you're really into the sport and buying a higher-end bike won't seem like such a commitment after all.

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