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  1. #51
    Ride The Lightning
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    Congrats on the 928! I have a C2C as well and I absolutely love the ride. I don't plan on racing, just training hard, so the feel is perfect for me. I honestly believe the 928 C2C is the sleeper frame of 2007. It's more laid back geometry excludes it from most serious conversations, but for people who want a great road bike that's comfortable and are considering the Pilot and Roubaix, they have to also give the C2C a spin.

    And best of all? The cool metal badge that says "made in italy". Not that it implies this bike is in any way better than the ones from the Far East, but rather, it just pulls at my sense of heritage: an Italian legend made in Italy. Most of the other Bianchi models on the US website (models not labeled "reparto corse" or not on the European Bianchi site) are made in in the far east - no biggy, but still, something is lost.

  2. #52
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Get some good advice

    And carefully weigh the risk/reward of buying from places like bikesdirect.

    This tread has basically two camps. Those who favor a LBS vs. those who prefer internet stores or eBay, with a dash of buy used advice. Sad to read so many comments about poorly trained clerks staffing your LBS. Perhaps I am spoiled living in a sprawling metropolitan area with 100 shops to choose from with-in an hour's drive. That level of competition tends to weed out the bs pretenders.

    To get the best service, visit shops on a week day when it's less busy. Talk to a few of the staff and get a sense of their passion and knowledge. A good store will take on and exude a certain personality. Look for a comfortable fit - not of a bike, but of the vibe of the store. Visit several stores. Even if you decide to go e-biz, a top shelf LBS can be a great source of information, camaraderie, ride hook-ups,... my local favorite has potluck socials and an on staff home brewer who brings his mini kegs The best deals are offered in the fall, winter, and early spring on the previous year models.

    Well maybe your selection of LBS's didn't measure up. The notion of saving 20-40% at internet.biz cannot be ignored. You are savvy about doing your homework and money can be saved.

    Best sizing guide/chart:

    http://davesbikeblog.blogspot.com/20...me-sizing.html
    http://www.prodigalchild.net/MoultonFrameSizeChart.pdf

    Keep in mind the lowest priced outlets offer the least flexibility. Youíll pay for a complete bike as is. Some of your initial savings will be eroded by purchasing the right stem, tires, saddle, etc. Better outfits like Colorado Cyclist, offer an extensive menu of choices. You might save 10 or 20% through them.

    What if you donít like your new bike? Check the return / exchange policy. Most e-biz companies offer no return/exchange once ridden. Many local bike shops have the same policy or very strict limits. Others are very flexible so itís important to ask.

    I would only recommend going ebay, used, or e-biz if you are comfortable with most basic repairs and adjustments. Can you true and retention a wheel? New bikes tend need this after a few hundred hard miles. Are you able to identify a trashed worn-out drive-train thatís been carefully scrubbed clean? If you are an all thumbs type, stick to the LBS, but have them show you how to repair a flat.

    New cyclists often evolve into very self sufficient knowledgeable gearheads. Where do you fall on the bell curve?

  3. #53
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Never online!

    Don't ever buy a bike from someone you can't punch in the face.

  4. #54
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    Honestly I have been wondering about what to do. I am trying not to get caught up in all the hype, and I have been looking and researching and sizing. I am a fix it kinda guy. I rebuilt the heads on my moms 68 Mustang, I built the kitchen in my house, redid the bathroom, put shelving in the garage, well you get the idea...
    I love the SRAM Grouppo. I know there were a few issues with brakes and the BB needs tightening after a couple of weeks but I like the shifters better than Shamino STI or Champy. I was drooling over the Specialized Tarmac S-Works SRAM Force bike it it costs WAY TO MUCH!!!! Anyway I was also looking at the Pedal force QS2 with SRAM Rival GROUPPO. It comes out to around $2,200 USD with speedplay x5 pedels. The closest thing I could find with similar components was around $4,400, but you also have to build it or have it buit. What I would like to do is find a bike shop that will let me play intern and learn, but I like projects like that..

  5. #55
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by ksjack
    Don't ever buy a bike from someone you can't punch in the face.
    hahahhaha +1
    LOOK / CERVELO / BRIDGESTONE / TREK / BMC / COLNAGO

  6. #56
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    You guys are a little crazy. Build a relationship with the LBS? The LBS is just like any other business in your local area... They should service you the same way if you are loyal to them or get in and get sized and then buy over the internet. At the end of the day it is all about money and service. If yiu dont get the service to need just ask for the manager. Much of their profits comes from service and not sales.

  7. #57
    HannahG
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    I just wanted to really thank everyone who put in some great advice on this thread (funknuggets, MB1, dr hoo, etc). With your tips, as well as the great staff at the LBS, I found the perfect bike for me It may not be the fanciest, but it's exactly what fits my skill and price level (we high schoolers don't exactly have that much extra $$)
    Thanks!

  8. #58
    ride to live,live to ride
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    from my "previous experences" with bikes bought on places like -ebay- and -amazon- it soon became obvouse that money spent on bikes at internet sites are not worth the time, effort, or thought that is put into buying a new bike from them. instead I would suggest and even get on my ->knee's<- and beg you not to waste your time on webpages like those but instead buy from your local bike shop because even as some has said not all bike shop retailers are interested in your fit but in your cash that is why i suggest visting fourms like these and other webpages to gather information on your desired bike,fit, ect. before going to a shop and be sure to double check or even triple check all the information you obtain because alot of websites have alot of faulse information. I ended up buying two brand new bikes from mainstreet bike(ky) shop and found that by see'ing what you buy before hand can help you decide if the fit, performance, and componates are what you are looking for and it can also help you decide what kind of riding you are wanting to do weither it is a mountain bike, road bike, or hybrid.

  9. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by schwinnfan4ever
    from my "previous experences" with bikes bought on places like -ebay- and -amazon- it soon became obvouse that money spent on bikes at internet sites are not worth the time, effort, or thought that is put into buying a new bike from them. instead I would suggest and even get on my ->knee's<- and beg you not to waste your time on webpages like those but instead buy from your local bike shop because even as some has said not all bike shop retailers are interested in your fit but in your cash that is why i suggest visting fourms like these and other webpages to gather information on your desired bike,fit, ect. before going to a shop and be sure to double check or even triple check all the information you obtain because alot of websites have alot of faulse information. I ended up buying two brand new bikes from mainstreet bike(ky) shop and found that by see'ing what you buy before hand can help you decide if the fit, performance, and componates are what you are looking for and it can also help you decide what kind of riding you are wanting to do weither it is a mountain bike, road bike, or hybrid.

    This is very bad advise; and it will become more clear how bad this advise is as time goes by.

    Thousands of people are buying bikes and other items online and saving tons of money. And you do not need to be some type of expert in order to figure out what to buy, what size you need, or how to setup. It is insulting to tell someone that if they are a beginning cyclist that they are not smart enough to figure things out.

    Our average customer is much more educated than the average bike shop employee. And all are smart enough to do a little research.

    In 2009 mode year; prices are increasing by about 20%. This will put entry road bikes at $800 to $900 with Shimano 2200 basic parts. Many new riders will skip road biking if they have to start at $1000 for bike, tax, and helmet. Lots will try out road bikes if they can get a nice new road bike at $400 or $500.

    We have sold thousands of road bikes at under $500 and customers love them. And why not; they are the same as bikes in shops that are running $800 or more. Many of our buyers at this level end up commuting or even doing cross country tours. The bikes hold up fine.

    Some people want to support LBS - I understand that. But it is wrong to suggest people can not get good quality bikes at good prices on-line. Plus no one beleives statements like that.

    Comsumers need choices
    Choices in products
    Choices in sellers
    Choices in price & service
    I LIKE CHOICES
    mike
    http://www.bikesdirect.com - supports Mtbr.com and RoadBikeReview.com as great places to exchange ideas
    ~~~~
    "First they ignore you, then they ridicule you, then they fight you, then you win." Ė Mahatma Ghandi

  10. #60
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    This forum seems to be winding down, but wait....I need some advice!

    I am looking for my first decent road bike, something I can grow in to over a few years. My experience prior to this, briefly, was mostly MTBing. I had Mongoose chromo, that I raced NORBA beginner/sport in NH/VT and later upgraded to a mid level GT with a manitou fork, lighter, but still triple butted chromo, with Shimano STI. I've had the GT for close to 10 yrs now and it's still a nice bike, mostly used to carry my youngest son in a toddler bike seat.

    I am 6'2/3(think I am shrinking), and about 208lbs on a weight decline (goal around 200lbs), with a 34" inseam. I started riding an 80s Schwinn varsity, I believe a 56cm frame @ 38lbs, which is definitely too small no matter what I extended. Then I got a Kent, GMC/Denail, the largest they made, but that might be too big. It's not that comfortable. I cramp up after 12-15miles and feel comfort, riding on my heels to stretch my legs. Not to mention every other gear clicks, grinds, or whines so I have to move to one before or after. The Denali measures at least 61-63cm and weighs 30lbs even-7005 Alum frame w/ chromo fork-Shimano SIS (looks racy, anyway).

    I intend to ride at least 2K miles a year if not more. My short term goals is to be able to keep up with my childhood friends, who weren't ever superior to me off the road, but now seem to have an edge, as they all ride Bianchi 928 C2C, or Tirenno Razza, all 4 of them have full carbon bikes. It's frustrating even on a casual ride, it's difficult to keep up over the long haul. When I ride alone, I only whiz by folks over 60 and most others whiz by me. The Denali has Shimano SIS derailleurs and I agree I could be in better shape, but I am in pretty decent shape now. I also run, rollerblade, and weight train.

    I really want to spend $700. I could stretch it for the right bike. I also wanted to buy something built in the US, pref from a LBS, which seems almost impossible at this price point. Here's my current options:
    1. LBS chain in NJ - '09 Cannondale CAAD 9 6 Triple (58cm) - weighs 21lbs, full aluminum, Carbon fork with alum steerer, Carb wrapped seat post, the rest "Optimo" alum frame with full Tiagra incl cranks - $800. I believe still made in US.
    2. LBS-Mom and Pop Generalist store - '07 Raleigh Grand Prix (59cm)(UK/China?) - Hydro alum frame with Easton Carb fork, carb wrapped post, 105 front, Ultegra rear - Shimano R500 wheels-Truativ Elita or GXP cranks- not sure on weight yet, but told 20 - $870
    3. LBS chain - '08 Fuji Roubaix (60/61cm)(US/Taiwan) - Alum frame with Carbon rear stays, carb blades fork-alum steerer, cromo crown, carb wrapped post - Tiagra up front with 105 in rear - Tiagra cranks - told about 20-21lbs - $775 w/ clipless pedals.
    3A. LBS Generalist - Trek 1.2 - I believe full Sora, maybe some Tiagra, aluminum with carbon fork. Weight - low 20s. $700 even. Folks tell me the name is still worth respecting.
    4. Longshot suggestion - Save up and go for Motobecane Immortal Pro, full carbon, for $1300.
    4A. " " - Tommasso - Advanced Race for $1100
    5. One of my 928 C2C friends thinks I should suck it up, maybe get clipless pedals, my bike tuned and wait a year/save money (if anyone is married out there, you know your window to buy a bike is a small one-who knows what next year will bring) I've only put about 500 miles on this bike so far, but lately I've been riding alot more. He's concerned I won't notice a big difference in a $700 bike and will be disappointed.
    6. I thought "used" but I don't have time in my life to tinker with a bike as much as I used to. I used to tinker when I was single, but there's not much time for that now.
    7. I want to read the size manuals out there for sure. To date, every bike shop has told me something different when it comes to size. 58/59/ up to 61. I am thinking 58/59 for more maneuvrability. Then again, I have pinched nerve/slightly herniated disk in my L2 vertebrae, which leaves my left quad partially numb and irritated at times, as well as my lower back. Some say I need a relaxed frame/geometry and more carbon. I can tell you I want performance first and I'll "grit" out any pain I endure. I've been doing it for 7 years now. By the way, I am a young (sometimes seems old) 35 yo.

    Thanks for the help in advance.

  11. #61
    Adventure Seeker
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    Your current bike is uncomfortable because it hasn't been fit - for $800, you can get the Corvus AL at BD online, and get it fit at a LBS. Please make a new post if you have any questions. Going to a LBS is ideal, as they can size, fit, and let you test ride before you buy.
    All the above bikes you mentioned are imported these days. All the frames come from either Taiwan or China nowadays...

  12. #62
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    looking for a new bike

    I am looking to buy a new bike for my wife. she has not rode a bike in over 15 years. I am not looking for anything fancy. something that will handle 5-10 miles a day, 2-3 times a week.

    i saw some bicycles for 200 or so, but was told that they weren't any good. friends told me to buy a bike from costco / bjs warehouses, but they seemed cheap. what are your thoughts?

  13. #63
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    ok ill warm you all i read the first page and stopped, im already prepared to perform my little rant

    Ebay - ok yes you will find items cheaper but
    1) it could be a scam they may not even arrive to you
    2) they most likely wont fit you well
    3) they could have been crashed ect ect
    4) they could be fakes
    5) you have to pay for servicing (most LBS's will give atleast a free 1st service)
    6) when you buy from a shop they look after you price wise with clothing, lights ect
    7)WARRANTY ebay leaves you with a nasty hole in your wallet should anything go wrong
    8) loyalty, sometimes supporting local business is just the done thing

    with a shop you get
    1) your number one asset WARRANTY this is a priceless playing card
    2) free service (at least the 1st if not more)
    3) swapping of parts you dont like
    4) they will do good deals if you buy their products
    5) fit out its not as easy as seatpost, using me for example - my old roadie came in stock, during fitout all these parts were changed, handlebars, stem, seat and tires now you add up the cost of all those parts up and see how much that ebay bike is actually costing....then compare that cost to the retail price of the shop bike because they will swap the new bits over from yours free of charge oh and also add the extra servicing costs on top also

  14. #64
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by bahueh
    if you think the only adjustments to a road bike are contained in the seat post...you need a bike SHAKEDOWN (whateve that means). Adjustments come in the form of stem length, bar drop, stem angle, shifter placement, seat height, seat distance fore/aft, crank length, pedal rise, seat angle, and Im' sure there are some others I'm forgetting...

    sure, you can do all that yourself..but it requires parts and a bit of knowledge about what is what...and where to put it.

    OK. Just my 2 cents. I am also a beginner/returnee. I have 2 bike shops where I live. Terrible selection, only Giant Defy's and MTB's, I went bike shopping a few weeks ago in NYC and visited around 5 good LBS's who were out of my size (56) and waiting for 2009 models to arrive in Nov. At which time the season would have been over. I wanted a TREK 2.1, BUT realy fell in love with the Madone 4.5 except the price was out of my range. I could not get the TREK 2.1 anywhere. So I went on-line to Bikesdirect and purchased the Motobacane Immortal Pro (set up like a Madone) for a fraction of the price. So I can afford to get the FIT at the LBS, This bike is beautiful/Carbon/105-Ultegra and weighs 19lbs. It does have cheaper rims/tires I think, Shimano/ Kenda. Took 4 days via UPS.

    I understand LBS's need to make a profit and I felt bad for my local one who tried to sell me the Giant Defy 3 which I just did not like. Also I beleive the markup is well over 100% according to a friend of mine who used to work in an LBS. Most of the good bikes are made in Taiwan by only a few manufacturers to different specs. I took a chance and received a great bike ON-LINE. Just be very happy with whatever you get!

  15. #65
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    To be safe and comfortable you are also going to have quite a few other initial expenses like shoes, helmet, tools, bags and clothes. Expect to pay and additional $300+ for all of that.

  16. #66
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    Hey I'm looking to get my first roadbike for commuting, I'm currently looking at single speed roadbikes. I don't really know anything about bikes in general, I've been looking a schwinns on the assumption that they're kind of a tried and true brand. The cutter looks nice at 300 but I'm wondering if it's worth it? Should I go for the Madison or look at different brands all together, I would prefer to keep it under 500 considering that I'm very tight on cash. Any help would be much appreciated.

  17. #67
    All or Nothing Baby!!!
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    I just recently built my first bike, from parts and things off ebay, as well as other places. If I could have done it again, I would have just bought a bike for a discount (at the end of the season for instance). It's guaranteed to be right, and if anything isn't, the store you bought it from should take care of it for free, or close to free! Whereas if you build your own bike, you only have yourself to blame, which could be good or bad.
    Zoom This!

  18. #68
    hail to the redskins
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    Buy on craigslist. If you are just getting into cycling, it is totally OK to buy used, it will save you a lot of cash. I bought my first bike on craiglist, and when i was ready to upgrade, I just resold it on Craigslist (for more than I originally paid for it).
    The early bird gets the worm, but the second mouse gets the cheese.

  19. #69
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    That's what I ended up doing. I bought a Specialized Sequoia Elite for 250, hardly ridden. I also ended up fixing up an old peugeot I found and turning it into a single speed for 35 bucks, best 35 bucks I ever spent.

  20. #70
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    If you live in an area that has a heavy cycling culture, than I would definitely check out Craig's list. You could get a great bike for a much lower cost. With the way things are in the economy right now, you could probably score a killer deal at a local bike store or online as well... My nephew's bike was purchased on Craig's list (he's 7) and it worked perfectly for him. It was scratched, but definitely road worthy.
    Quality Comfort Bikes...Price Match Guarantee

  21. #71
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    If you bought a bike online and your LBS treats you any different than if you had bought from them, they don't deserve your business. I'd rather go 20 miles out of my way than have to put up with a business that won't offer advice or service to someone who didn't buy from them. At a good bike shop there are 0 advantages to buying a bike from them when it comes to service, unless you think a basic $25 fit for free is an advantage.

    Warranty issues are just about the only advantage you have to going local, as start-up issues are usually taken care of pretty quick, instead of having to RMA your bike back to the buyer.

    This "LBS relationship" line is simply making excuses for poor business. Anyone with any sort of knowledge in managing or running a business should know this. Riders spending their first 5 minutes in your shop should get the same service, advice, and prices as someone who's been in your shop for 10 years, because anyone who knows anything knows that someone isn't spending time in your shop for 10 years because they're looking for more discounts. LBS comes down to customer service. Friendly, informative, and helpful. If you compare 90% of the accessories they carry, you'll find them cheaper by at least 40% online.

    Fund-raiser rides, components, tools, and services are all worthwhile investments to spend on an LBS, and it's how they make their money, so don't be fooled by anyone who tells you that you need to support your local LBS by buying bikes/accessories from them at inflated costs.
    Last edited by Kleh; 03-11-2009 at 02:34 PM.

  22. #72
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    Interestingly, I benefited from doing both (ebay and LBS). I was ready to buy a bike from the LBS but as it was a bike that had a frame that hadn't sold for 4 years, I thought I could deal on it. The day I went in to make the deal, I went on Ebay to do some research and found the exact same bike on sale (listed by the same LBS) for 500 less on "buy it now". There was no reserve and when you take into account the money they pay out to ebay and paypal it is even less. I made the deal based on their opening acceptable bid which was 500 less than the "buy it now". I was ultimately happier to buy it from a LBS. Doing homework sometimes pays off!

  23. #73
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    Great First Bike at Sears

    www.sears.com is offering a great deal on a beginners Road Bike. It's a Schwinn Signia and it's on sale for $169.99. This may not be as good as a Trek or Giant, but it sure costs a lot less. This appears to be an excellent entry level bike. Great way to make sure you are going to like the sport before spending $1000's of dollars.

  24. #74
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    For what it's worth....here's what I did. Wife and I decided at 44, it was time to get in shape for real this time. I have bad wheels (ankles), so running is not an option for me and I really don't enjoy going to the gym (even though we have one in our subdivision). So, we turned to cycling. I found, at a pawn shop, a used Fuji Newest 3.0, 2006, that looked like crap, but rode well and everything worked. So, for $125.00 I bought it. Got my wife a similar type bike, also at a pawn shop.

    Next, after a couple of weeks of making sure, we purchased the accessories; road bike shoes, clipless pedals, bike shorts, helmets, gloves, water bottles, etc. These items were all transferrable, should we move up in bikes.

    Lastly, after about 6 weeks of continual riding, with long range plans for future rides, (and becoming a RBR member-learned a lot here), we KNEW that cycling was for us, and we both purchased new road bikes that we knew we would be happy with for years to come. My wife is the simple one, she got a new Redline road bike w/Sram components, and I ordered, and had built a Look frame w/Shimano components.

    As a side note, in the middle of this process, we established a relationship with a local LBS, from which my wife purchased her bike and I paid them to assemble mine. (total spent to date is about $1000.00 for both). So now, we have the best of both worlds. We weren't out anything if we hated this sport (i knew I could resell both bikes for what we had in them), AND, we found a LBS that we trust and will use for all future cycle related items (assuming we can't find it on the 'net for less....lol).

    This path worked for us, and I hope it helps someone else. Regardless of what you do, I can say this, I am extremely glad we found cycling (or visa versa) and wish it was something we had been doing together 20 years ago. Good luck to all!

  25. #75
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    I bought my first hybrid on a budget. I have been into mountain biking for the past 16 years and it got to the point I was riding on the rail trails 95% of the time so I finally took the plunge and bought a Giant FCR3 on sale for $550. 3 years ago I bought the most expensive hard tail mountain bike I could find at the time (Specialized rock hopper comp 2006). I had all the bells and whistles like an air shock and the best paint job and the Deore shifting components. I paid almost $900 in all and I was to afraid to take it on the trails after spending so much. I relaized later I bought it mostly for show to ride on the rail trails. It was more bike than what I needed and I realised I could have gotten by on a brand new $400 mountain bike. I always got a sore ass from riding it 20 miles at a time. It was very durable and flawless shifting. I never used the shocks (I think I only inflated them once). I was such a rail trail rider I wanted to go further and faster. Finally I sold it for $400 on craigslist and went down to my local bike shop. I told the salesman I ride 95% on pavement (rail trail) and he immediately directed me to the hybrid bikes. I think there were only 8 hanging from the ceiling ranging in price from $550 to $1,400 (I seen Treks, Fisher, Cannondale and Giant). He sized me up and tool the cheapest bike down and I went over it tooth and nail.I added a wireless computer and the total cost me $630 out the door. I put almost 40 miles on it in 2 days and I cannot beleive the difference! Much more comfortable ride and faster. I had to struggle to hit 15 MPH on the mountain bike. Now I can hit 16 MPH with no problem. I am breaking all my old records that I held with the mountain bikes that I have owned in the past. I am now a roadie for life! Goodbye mountain bikes!
    Giant FCR3 (2009)

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