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  1. #1
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    Lock Advice Needed

    I'm new here and very happy to have found this forum. My wife and I just bought hybrids and are getting back into biking after several years.

    We live in Ipswich, MA, which is not a high crime area as yet. But I do want to have a decent lock. I'm kind of drawn to folding steel locks such as this one:

    http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00EOX6DJQ/...=I33K8NBXTBGOS

    I'd also get a double-looped steel cable to put through the front wheel and seat. I realize that all such cables can be pretty easily cut, but I'm hoping that using both locks together will convince thieves to try another bike.

    Does anyone have a folding lock? How do you like it (or why don't you like it)?

    Thanks.

  2. #2
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    No experience myself but a guy I work with uses one of those and says it's great. What he likes about it is that it's easy to carry compared to a U-Lock.

  3. #3
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    This ended up being long, sorry but I hate locks in general. Itís a necessary evil.

    There's probably a thread on the forums about all this too.

    I did a bunch of looking when I got my commuter bike and it tuns out all bike locks are crap. In some reviews that folding one is more about convenience than security and a decent cable lock would work as well or better and be nearly as convenient.

    What I found recommended is a U lock around the back tire and your seat tube and immovable object, if you can, then a cable or chain lock around the front wheel, frame and immovable object. Your back wheel cost 3X more than your front one. So if you have a single lock it needs to go around the back wheel, frame and object. Put locking skewers in the front if you like.

    Try YouTube for the "Hal Ruzal Grades Your Bike Locking" videos.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aTA3...nnel=sertasald

    The other problem I've found is most frames these days don't actually have round tubes where you can mount a lock with the included mounting hardware. Then you have the problem of external cabling along your top and down tubes. Even if there round the lock mount interferes with the cabling. Donít end up with a 5 lb. U lock and no place to attach it. Make sure that flat lock will attach to your bike the way you think, if you actually get it.

    I like cable locks for convenience because you can wrap them around the head tube and top tube. This keeps them out of most cables. A heavy cable for each bike may be all you need. Use both, around both bikes, around the immovable object.

    A U lock is probably actually better than a cable but use it around the back wheel, frame and immovable object.

    You will hear that small bottle jacks can easily break a U lock but if theres no space to get the jack in to then no they canít. Also if you go with a U lock make it one that locks both ends. Even if itís cut it has to be pried apart to get the bike out.

  4. #4
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    A lot will depend on the value of your bikes, where you're locking them, for how long, and what time of the day.

    Look up the reviews on the OnGuard K9 before buying it. Many of the reviews are poor, and apparently there are a few ways to relatively easily defeat the lock.

    I've used U-Locks in the past. They're heavy, and hard to attach to stuff, unless you have an extra-large one. And, still, you should either remove the front wheel, or lock with a secondary cable or chain lock.

    Now I'm using a 1/2" cable combination lock that is self-curling. Perhaps not the most secure of locks, but it does its job, and I like the portability and ease of use. The bike is generally in a controlled environment at night.

  5. #5
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    The topic gets discussed quite a lot here. I did a search for you. Check some of these threads.
    http://forums.roadbikereview.com/sea...earchid=619325
    Have you ever been to Electric Ladyland?

  6. #6
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    If you do your research, you will find that almost all bike locks can be defeated. There is really no full proof bike lock that can't be cut one way or another.

    That's not to say you shouldn't lock your bike up, but you need to be smart about minimizing the probability that your bike will be stolen.

    The best way to avoid theft is to never leave your bike unattended. You will see most road cyclist with high end bikes don't carry locks as they don't leave their bikes unattended plus, most proper bike locks will weigh 5lbs which defeats the purpose of a high end road bike.

    If you must leave your bike unattended, then I would suggest carrying a u-lock with a cable to wrap around the wheels. The majority of thieves look for the easy to steal items... ie unlocked wheels, bags, lights etc... The key is to make it more difficult than the next bike to steal and there are plenty of those out there.

    The compromise is always the amount of locks and cables you carry vs the weight and inconvenience of all that hardware. I've resorted to always going to a coffee shop or restaurant where there is a patio and lock the bike with a light weight cable lock. The bike is always within my sight.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by JCavilia View Post
    The topic gets discussed quite a lot here. I did a search for you. Check some of these threads.
    http://forums.roadbikereview.com/sea...earchid=619325
    Unfortunately your saved search either doesn't work for everyone, or didn't get saved. Nonetheless, there is a lot of info available with some quick searches both on this site, and on the web in general.

    And, if you are interested in research, take your target lock type, and look up the information on the web on how to defeat it as undoubtedly the thieves will already know the information.

  8. #8
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    Thank you, everyone, for your suggestions. I guess the best thing to do would be to lock my bike with heavy motorcycle chains and some bomb proof padlock. But then I woudn't be able to ride and carry it all. I probably won't be leaving the bikes unwatched very often, if at all, for a while. So I'll use the time for more research.

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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mass. Wine Guy View Post
    Thank you, everyone, for your suggestions. I guess the best thing to do would be to lock my bike with heavy motorcycle chains and some bomb proof padlock. But then I woudn't be able to ride and carry it all. I probably won't be leaving the bikes unwatched very often, if at all, for a while. So I'll use the time for more research.
    Yea, I did a lot of looking too. For the money and weight take a look at this: Knog Straight Jacket Fatty Chain Lock. While they have average reviews on Amazon where I ordered mine, they have solid reviews out on the web that shows they are a solid lock. See this review: Locks test 2013 | Ride On . Thiscan lock is consided heavy duty protection and resisted hammers, crowbars, hacksaws.... needed the angle iron to cut it open.

    If I get to where I will leave the bike locked up for more than 30 mins then I will carry a ULock, but that will be a planned trip and not just a run into the store for a few minutes.

    rsdowdy
    Last edited by rsdowdy; 08-05-2014 at 07:32 PM.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by CliffordK View Post
    Unfortunately your saved search either doesn't work for everyone, or didn't get saved. .
    sorry bout that. If you go to Advanced Search and look for threads with "lock" in the titles you find lots of discussions.
    Have you ever been to Electric Ladyland?

  12. #12
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    RS, but which U lock would you use? A great many of them can be easily cut with large bolt cutters:

    Gone In 60 Seconds - The Bike Crime Wave Part 1 - YouTube

    Are there one or two best U locks?

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mass. Wine Guy View Post
    RS, but which U lock would you use? A great many of them can be easily cut with large bolt cutters:

    Gone In 60 Seconds - The Bike Crime Wave Part 1 - YouTube

    Are there one or two best U locks?
    I don't live in a high crime area so have not considered buying the heaviest of locks(and don't want to lug around all that weight!). For the money and the weight I like the Blackburn Leavenworth Long U-Lock that can be purchased for about 45.00 (about 65.00 retail, 45 on Amazon atm). The long lock allowing me to more easily lock my bike to things instead of a shorter lock. It has some mixed reviews, as do all locks, but resist bolt cutters. It has a laser cut key and is a more of an unknown lock so will resist picking attempts and bump keys. I would think that using 2 strong locks would make my bike less of a target than others. Although many others suggest using a ULock and a cable lock, I don't like -any- of the cables as even a pair of handheld wire snips can work your way though a cable.
    Best advice is always lock up your bike in a well lighted area, a place where there is video surveillance, and where people can keep an eye on it. If you have to leave your bike outside over night then I would consider buying just a commuter bike and making it look as undesirable as possible and take your front wheel in with you at night. This will make it look like the bike has already been vandalized as well. It would unnerve me to no end to know my bike was left out on the street all night long, but I guess if I had a 3-400.00 bike and made it look like a 75.00 bike without a front tire, then I could sleep better.

    rsdowdy

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mass. Wine Guy View Post
    RS, but which U lock would you use? A great many of them can be easily cut with large bolt cutters:

    Gone In 60 Seconds - The Bike Crime Wave Part 1 - YouTube

    Are there one or two best U locks?
    Bottom line. If a thief wants your bike, it's theirs. Two ways to reduce your chance at getting yours stolen:

    1) Any decent lock will make your bike a more difficult target so the thief will move on to an easier target.

    2) Don't ride the nicest most expensive bike. Try to park it near bikes that are nicer and less protected than yours.

  15. #15
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    Good advice, Lombard. If I had a very expensive bike and needed to park it on the street routinely, I guess I'd camouflage it by making it look really crappy and cheap.

    Anyone know if the Vulcan VLS101B Supreme U lock is sold in the U.S.? It's Australian.

  16. #16
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    Your bikes security will depend on the level of crime in your area.

    I have tried other locks such as Kryptonite Kryptolok Series 2 which is solid with a high security disc cylinder. By comparison, Vulcan Supremeís double bracket is convenient for storing the lock when you are pedalling considering the 1.2kg of the lock alone.
    But the fact is that there is no padlock that you can say that even the best bolt cutters for master locks canít bring this down.
    The best way would be to cautiously consider where and how you are locking the bike.
    Lock the bike in an illuminated area, a place where you or someone else can watch it.

    It is also clever to lock it in the midst of other improperly secured two-wheelers so that yours becomes more unlikely to be the first target.
    Never leave it unattended even when running short errands, at least carry a u-lock and cable to wrap the wheels or to a rigid structure. This will make it a less desirable target.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sarahaw View Post
    Your bikes security will depend on the level of crime in your area.

    I have tried other locks such as Kryptonite Kryptolok Series 2 which is solid with a high security disc cylinder. By comparison, Vulcan Supremeís double bracket is convenient for storing the lock when you are pedalling considering the 1.2kg of the lock alone.
    But the fact is that there is no padlock that you can say that even the best bolt cutters for master locks canít bring this down.
    The best way would be to cautiously consider where and how you are locking the bike.
    Lock the bike in an illuminated area, a place where you or someone else can watch it.

    It is also clever to lock it in the midst of other improperly secured two-wheelers so that yours becomes more unlikely to be the first target.
    Never leave it unattended even when running short errands, at least carry a u-lock and cable to wrap the wheels or to a rigid structure. This will make it a less desirable target.
    Interesting that you bring up bolt cutters which can certainly cut through many locks easily. That brings up a story of when I bought this heavy chain lock to lock something in my yard. I had a bolt cutter which I decided to test to see how easily it would be to cut through this chain. I broke the bolt cutter! That being said, the chain I had would not be the kind of weight you would want to carry on a bike!

    As I said earlier in this thread - 4 years ago - it's not about making your bike theft proof, it's about making it a less easy target. Since many bike thefts are ride-offs, not a guy cutting locks and piling them in a pickup truck, any lock will be better than no lock.

    Ironically, a busy urban street is actually a worse place to park than a quiet one. You would think, more people, more visibility. However, in the chaos of crowds so to say, someone taking a bike will hardly be noticed. After all, who would steal a bike in the middle of a crowded street? Do you see the psychology of this? On a deserted street, all eyes will be on the thief.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

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  18. #18
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    hybrids are theft deterrents in themselves.
    Yossarian: don't worry. nothing's going to happen to you that won't happen to the rest of us.

  19. #19
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    After 4 years, let's hope the OP has at least moved up to a decent ROAD bike.
    "L'enfer, c'est les autres"

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by blackfrancois View Post
    hybrids are theft deterrents in themselves.
    Not really. Probably stolen 3 years ago. The guy has since given up cycling and purchased some used roller blades.

  21. #21
    pmf
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    Quote Originally Posted by No Time Toulouse View Post
    After 4 years, let's hope the OP has at least moved up to a decent ROAD bike.
    It's funny how hybrids are so appealing to novice riders. I occasionally get asked what bike I'd recommend for commuting to work (I've been a bike commuter for 25 years). I always tell the person get a road bike because you'll be riding on pavement. Invariably they end up buying a hybrid. The ones who stick with it end up buying a road bike a year or so later.

  22. #22
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    You can always look at Amazon selections about folding lock.

  23. #23
    91Sicc
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    Hi everybody who reads this. I Have little to say at the moment, but I will state that I ride 5 days a week as a recreational rider. I have owned a dozen road bikes in the past 7 years. I popped my cherry saddling up with a 2006 Specialized Tarmac Pro. I still own it, always will. not a bad start right? Now years later and thousands of miles logged in I am on mu 2016 Trek Domane 6.9 Disc. I have the Duo Trap cadence sensor installed and it is paired up with my pioneer SGX-CA500 Cyclometer. And that is connected to the Pioneer PowerMeter Dura-Ace 9000 Dual Arm Crankset. Di2 is the bomb. A rocket of a bicycle, comfortable is an understatement. Flies over chewed up asphalt roads. My current race bike is a 2012 Scott Addict R3. I'm currently riding this as I have a problem with my Dura-Ace non-drive side crank arm. This will be brought to the table in my next post. Thank you again for your time. Ride safe everyone.

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