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Thread: New bike advice

  1. #26
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    Looking for first Road Bike. Considering one these

    2009 Trek 1.5 Triple $600.00
    Frame Alpha Black Aluminum
    Fork Bontrager Race, carbon; SpeedTrap compatible
    Wheels Bontrager Race Lite
    Tires Bontrager Select, 700x25c
    Shifters Shimano Sora STI, 9 speed
    Front derailleur Shimano Sora
    Rear derailleur Shimano Tiagra GS
    Crank FSA Vero 50/39/30
    Cassette SRAM PG950 11-26, 9 speed
    Saddle Bontrager Race Basic
    Seatpost Bontrager Race Lite Basic
    Handlebar Bontrager SSR VR Bend OS, 31.8mm
    Stem Bontrager Race Lite OS, 7 degree, 31.8mm
    Headset Aheadset w/semi-cartridge bearings, integrated, sealed, alloy
    Brakeset Alloy dual pivot w/Shimano Sora STI levers
    VS

    Maroon R 2000 Cannondale S1 slice Ultra
    58 cm,mavic rims,carbon fiber handle bar in good condition $475.00 OBO.

  2. #27
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    You may want to start your own thread rather than hijack this one, might get more hits and responses. But I would say if your budget is $600 and you are patient, you can find MUCH better than those two.

  3. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter P. View Post
    If you want to fit 28mm tires on your bike, your bike, your only choice is disc brakes.
    Disc brakes eliminate the brake arch over the tire, freeing up room for larger tires.
    If you can live with 25mm tires, rim brakes are fine; they have been, for decades.
    Huh? I've been putting 28's on rim brake bikes for 30 years. Most newer rim brake bikes allow 28's easily as well.
    2015 Specialized Tarmac, Ultegra 6800, HED C2 rims
    2014 Specialized Roubaix Expert, Ultegra 6800, HED C 2 rims.
    2012 Giant Defy Advanced 2, Ultegra, Pacenti SL 23 rims.
    Moots VaMoots, Dura-Ace, Pacenti SL 23 rims

  4. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by MarcMoon View Post
    2009 Trek 1.5 Triple $600.00
    Frame Alpha Black Aluminum
    Fork Bontrager Race, carbon; SpeedTrap compatible
    Wheels Bontrager Race Lite
    Tires Bontrager Select, 700x25c
    Shifters Shimano Sora STI, 9 speed
    Front derailleur Shimano Sora
    Rear derailleur Shimano Tiagra GS
    Crank FSA Vero 50/39/30
    Cassette SRAM PG950 11-26, 9 speed
    Saddle Bontrager Race Basic
    Seatpost Bontrager Race Lite Basic
    Handlebar Bontrager SSR VR Bend OS, 31.8mm
    Stem Bontrager Race Lite OS, 7 degree, 31.8mm
    Headset Aheadset w/semi-cartridge bearings, integrated, sealed, alloy
    Brakeset Alloy dual pivot w/Shimano Sora STI levers
    VS

    Maroon R 2000 Cannondale S1 slice Ultra
    58 cm,mavic rims,carbon fiber handle bar in good condition $475.00 OBO.
    I would tend to favor the Cannondale.

    If you choose the Trek, keep in mind that there have been many instances of premature failure on those Bontrager wheels - spoke hole cracking. So budget yourself another $200 for an entry level road wheelset.
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

    "Beware of geeks bearing formulas."
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    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



  5. #30
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    Trek Madone 5.2

    I think it has been long enough where I can hijack this thread and make it my own so I don't have to create a new one for a simple questions.

    Can someone with a little more experience take a look at this and see if it's a good deal or I'm way out of line? I'm about to pull the trigger on it. To me, everything seem to be high quality, but I could be wrong. Looking at the wheels alone, those are $800 wheels. It's also in fantastic condition. I've been looking online for a cheap bike to figure out what I like and don't like, but I've wasted a lot of time doing so and I've gotten nowhere with it. I've decided to ditch that idea and just get the bike that I plan on using for years to come. I have committed to doing a 106 mile race in November with no riding experience and need to start trailing. This bike is listed for 2k, I offered $1,100 and he laughed in my face. He said he'll do $1,900 for it. Here are the specs:


    2014 Trek Madone 5.2 (All black)
    Frame size 58cm.
    Groupo: SRAM Force. 11 SPD.
    Crank size: 50/34 175mm
    Cassette: Sram Power dome 11/28.
    Shifters: Sram Double Tap.
    Bars: Bontrager Carbon RXL 42CM
    STEM: Bontrager XXX Carbon 90mm.
    Saddle: Bontrager Carbon RXL 138.
    Wheels: Mercury M5


    Any advice is helpful, I just don't want to overpay, which is easy to do when you're new to something. Thank you all!

  6. #31
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    You are more than welcome. It is yours now.

    By the way, I had a chance to ride my Focus and I love it. And, I had to basically stop myself buying cycling stuff, I got so much into it and carried on ..... clothes, little things, tubes, pump, bottle cages, quad lock, lights, etc... stopped for now.

  7. #32
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    Best advice I and realistically anyone else

  8. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Piconner View Post
    I think it has been long enough where I can hijack this thread and make it my own so I don't have to create a new one for a simple questions.

    Can someone with a little more experience take a look at this and see if it's a good deal or I'm way out of line? I'm about to pull the trigger on it. To me, everything seem to be high quality, but I could be wrong. Looking at the wheels alone, those are $800 wheels. It's also in fantastic condition. I've been looking online for a cheap bike to figure out what I like and don't like, but I've wasted a lot of time doing so and I've gotten nowhere with it. I've decided to ditch that idea and just get the bike that I plan on using for years to come. I have committed to doing a 106 mile race in November with no riding experience and need to start trailing. This bike is listed for 2k, I offered $1,100 and he laughed in my face. He said he'll do $1,900 for it. Here are the specs:


    2014 Trek Madone 5.2 (All black)
    Frame size 58cm.
    Groupo: SRAM Force. 11 SPD.
    Crank size: 50/34 175mm
    Cassette: Sram Power dome 11/28.
    Shifters: Sram Double Tap.
    Bars: Bontrager Carbon RXL 42CM
    STEM: Bontrager XXX Carbon 90mm.
    Saddle: Bontrager Carbon RXL 138.
    Wheels: Mercury M5


    Any advice is helpful, I just don't want to overpay, which is easy to do when you're new to something. Thank you all!
    This is what Bicycle Blue Book comes up with:

    https://www.bicyclebluebook.com/Sear...50&model=62139

    That being said, since this is a used carbon bike, I would have a trusted bike shop examine the frame carefully for damage.

    Also, while those wheels seem like they would obviously increase the value, I have to ask you how much do you weigh? If you are anywhere north of 200lbs., carbon hoops are probably not a great idea.

    BTW, if I were asking $2K for a bike and you offered me $1,100, I would laugh in your face too.
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

    "Beware of geeks bearing formulas."
    -- Warren Buffett

    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



  9. #34
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    I absolutely expected to get laughed at for that offer, haha. The blue book is the first thing I looked at, and with the upgrades, I thought $1,900 was a good deal. He's upgraded more than just the wheels and if I bought this bike without upgrades from someone else for $1500 and did upgrades, it would end up being a lot more than the $400 that I could just pay now. I could ride with a small child on my back and not be 200+. I'm 6 foot 150!

  10. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Piconner View Post
    I absolutely expected to get laughed at for that offer, haha. The blue book is the first thing I looked at, and with the upgrades, I thought $1,900 was a good deal. He's upgraded more than just the wheels and if I bought this bike without upgrades from someone else for $1500 and did upgrades, it would end up being a lot more than the $400 that I could just pay now. I could ride with a small child on my back and not be 200+. I'm 6 foot 150!

    OK the, it sounds like a good deal......if it hasn't been crashed. If the seller won't accompany you to a bike shop of your choice to have the frame examined, ask him why? At the very least, bring a magnifying glass and in good lighting, examine the downtube carefully for cracks.
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

    "Beware of geeks bearing formulas."
    -- Warren Buffett

    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



  11. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Piconner View Post
    I think it has been long enough where I can hijack this thread and make it my own so I don't have to create a new one for a simple questions.

    Can someone with a little more experience take a look at this and see if it's a good deal or I'm way out of line? I'm about to pull the trigger on it. To me, everything seem to be high quality, but I could be wrong. Looking at the wheels alone, those are $800 wheels. It's also in fantastic condition. I've been looking online for a cheap bike to figure out what I like and don't like, but I've wasted a lot of time doing so and I've gotten nowhere with it. I've decided to ditch that idea and just get the bike that I plan on using for years to come. I have committed to doing a 106 mile race in November with no riding experience and need to start trailing. This bike is listed for 2k, I offered $1,100 and he laughed in my face. He said he'll do $1,900 for it. Here are the specs:


    2014 Trek Madone 5.2 (All black)
    Frame size 58cm.
    Groupo: SRAM Force. 11 SPD.
    Crank size: 50/34 175mm
    Cassette: Sram Power dome 11/28.
    Shifters: Sram Double Tap.
    Bars: Bontrager Carbon RXL 42CM
    STEM: Bontrager XXX Carbon 90mm.
    Saddle: Bontrager Carbon RXL 138.
    Wheels: Mercury M5


    Any advice is helpful, I just don't want to overpay, which is easy to do when you're new to something. Thank you all!
    2K for that spec? I don't think that's a great deal. And I'm a SRAM biased guy, I love double tap. Look, upgrades don't translate to higher price cleanly. Like a car, mod it and you know you aren't getting money back, or much money, on the mods. That's money spent and gone... That's life. Those wheels don't impress me. Pushing 1,700g for 50s in carbon... Is the brake track OK on that with the under frame set-up? Rear brake is mounted to bottom bracket on that bike right? The design revolution that never really left the launch pad. Used carbon is used carbon dude. Crack in wheel set could be dangerous, but not a big money factor, crack in frame is both. Seller is going to eat that risk.

    Is it your size?
    To date, philosophers have merely interpreted the world in various ways. The point however is to change it.

  12. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by PBL450 View Post
    2K for that spec? I don't think that's a great deal. And I'm a SRAM biased guy, I love double tap. Look, upgrades don't translate to higher price cleanly. Like a car, mod it and you know you aren't getting money back, or much money, on the mods. That's money spent and gone... That's life. Those wheels don't impress me. Pushing 1,700g for 50s in carbon... Is the brake track OK on that with the under frame set-up? Rear brake is mounted to bottom bracket on that bike right? The design revolution that never really left the launch pad. Used carbon is used carbon dude. Crack in wheel set could be dangerous, but not a big money factor, crack in frame is both. Seller is going to eat that risk.

    Is it your size?
    My thought process is I can get the bike with no mods for like 14-1500. Those mods are worth the 400 extra, I believe. If I don't get something used I'm spending the same amount for a new bike, but it's a basic level bike. The bike is only a couple years old, picking it up from the guys house and I have all of his information. If there was a crack and he was trying to slide on by me, he wouldn't be this open about things. That's no so much a worry for me. Maybe I'm nieve, but does carbon really crack that easily? 58 is the size for me. I can make a 56 and a 60 work, but the 58 feels a little better.


    Here's the actual post for the bike
    https://chicago.craigslist.org/nwi/bik/6017014601.html

  13. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by PBL450 View Post
    2K for that spec? I don't think that's a great deal. And I'm a SRAM biased guy, I love double tap. Look, upgrades don't translate to higher price cleanly. Like a car, mod it and you know you aren't getting money back, or much money, on the mods. That's money spent and gone... That's life. Those wheels don't impress me. Pushing 1,700g for 50s in carbon... Is the brake track OK on that with the under frame set-up? Rear brake is mounted to bottom bracket on that bike right? The design revolution that never really left the launch pad. Used carbon is used carbon dude. Crack in wheel set could be dangerous, but not a big money factor, crack in frame is both. Seller is going to eat that risk.

    Is it your size?
    I agree with much of this. Buying used CF frame/ fork is a risk. Used frame/ fork/ wheelset, more of a risk.

    Cost of upgrades isn't generally retrievable, so the seller can laugh at the price offered, but I doubt there's a line waiting to pay it.

    Re: the wheelset, below is a link to reviews... generally positive, but not all. If you do opt to buy the bike, be careful to use the upgraded OEM pads mentioned in the reviews.

    https://www.competitivecyclist.com/m...view-atg635320

    Lastly, getting your sizing requirements met is a biggie in the bike world. Get this wrong and the bike will never fit well and won't be a great deal, no matter the price paid.

    My best advice is to (roughly) half your budget and buy new from a reputable LBS. Lots of very nice bikes offered in the $1,200 price range. And with it you get sizing/ fit assistance and a warranty. Maybe less bling, but a better bet, IMHO.

  14. #39
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    $1400-$1900 can get you a lot of new bike, way past entry level, if you keep your eyes open for sales. Honestly you should be able to find a 105/Ultegra mix in that price range, in some cases full on Ultegra although probably on an alloy frame.

    But if that alloy frame is say a CAAD12 or Allez, you are not really missing out on the whole carbon thing...

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    I think PBL450's views are common here. Buying used carbon is a risk that many here won't take. Does carbon crack easily? If it was a simple yes or no answer, then either no one would be buying used carbon or everyone would. So the answer is, it depends. Take a stem and crank down on the bolts too much and a CF steerer will crack using a simple hex wrench. CF wheels are designed to take the stresses of tensioned spokes; if there is a crack, either it was a manufacturing defect, the wheel builder messed up somewhere, or they were ridden hard--really hard.

    And in that lies the problem. Was the bike abused? Was it crashed? Regardless of how the bike is presented, the greatest risk is the unknown. Yes, you have to be going into the deal hoping for the best, but you would be foolish not to expect the worst. If the bike fits and you get years of reliable enjoyment out of it then great! If something fails and you feel like you're been shystered, well, take it as a lesson in life.

    Counter with $1800. Caveat emptor.
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    Quote Originally Posted by jetdog9 View Post
    $1400-$1900 can get you a lot of new bike, way past entry level, if you keep your eyes open for sales. Honestly you should be able to find a 105/Ultegra mix in that price range, in some cases full on Ultegra although probably on an alloy frame.

    But if that alloy frame is say a CAAD12 or Allez, you are not really missing out on the whole carbon thing...
    I've seen Cannondale CAAD12 for $1500. I believe it was a 2016 model. Is that a better deal? The biggest problem here is I haven't had a bike since I was 14 and it was a Kmart huffy for $120. When it comes to the ins-and-outs of this stuff, I'm completely lost. I've been looking daily for 2 months and I still hardly know what's going on. I thought the one I posted was a good deal, and to an extent still do. It seems like everyone is saying to avoid it because it's CF and COULD BE cracked. If it's not, it seems like it's a good deal. I can go pay $1500 for a 2016 model that retailed at $2000 at a LBS. Or buy a bike that retailed for $3500 in 2014 with $1500 in upgrades for $1900. From a value standpoint, that looked good to me, but like I said, I'm a novice.

    The bike shops in Detroit aren't the best either. They're all custom made shops and repair shops. Couple Trek stores, but they were all selling new models that we're discounted.

  17. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Piconner View Post
    I've seen Cannondale CAAD12 for $1500. I believe it was a 2016 model. Is that a better deal? The biggest problem here is I haven't had a bike since I was 14 and it was a Kmart huffy for $120. When it comes to the ins-and-outs of this stuff, I'm completely lost. I've been looking daily for 2 months and I still hardly know what's going on. I thought the one I posted was a good deal, and to an extent still do. It seems like everyone is saying to avoid it because it's CF and COULD BE cracked. If it's not, it seems like it's a good deal. I can go pay $1500 for a 2016 model that retailed at $2000 at a LBS. Or buy a bike that retailed for $3500 in 2014 with $1500 in upgrades for $1900. From a value standpoint, that looked good to me, but like I said, I'm a novice.

    The bike shops in Detroit aren't the best either. They're all custom made shops and repair shops. Couple Trek stores, but they were all selling new models that we're discounted.
    This, to me, describes someone who should be buying new from a LBS. You admit you're lost on the topic of bikes/ components - so I'm assuming fitting yourself is out.

    Why not visit some shops, ride a few bikes in your price range, and pick the best bike (hopefully) at the best shop - one that offers a decent fitting for the price of the bike purchase. If that means broadening the search beyond Detroit, IMO it would be an investment versus settling for new/ used within a certain proximity.

    As to "value", there's different ways of looking at that. If you get a used bike that is your size, but not fitted to you, will you ever be *really* comfortable riding it? Then, how important will those upgraded components/ wheelsets be.

    And when buying used CF, there's the risk factor. No warranty and expensive to repair. So if you're set on buying used, my suggestion is to stay with alu/ steel frames.

  18. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by PJ352 View Post
    This, to me, describes someone who should be buying new from a LBS. You admit you're lost on the topic of bikes/ components - so I'm assuming fitting yourself is out.

    Why not visit some shops, ride a few bikes in your price range, and pick the best bike (hopefully) at the best shop - one that offers a decent fitting for the price of the bike purchase. If that means broadening the search beyond Detroit, IMO it would be an investment versus settling for new/ used within a certain proximity.

    As to "value", there's different ways of looking at that. If you get a used bike that is your size, but not fitted to you, will you ever be *really* comfortable riding it? Then, how important will those upgraded components/ wheelsets be.

    And when buying used CF, there's the risk factor. No warranty and expensive to repair. So if you're set on buying used, my suggestion is to stay with alu/ steel frames.

    That's good advice, I appreciate that. Here's probably a dumb question, but would do a ton for me. WHen I went to a local bike shop the only "fitting" they did was have me stand over the bike and see the clearance when lifted. That's how I figured out the size I need. What more custom fitting is there? I imagine just adjusting the seat/handlebars/etc. but can't you do that on both a new and used bike? Is there something I'm missing here? Or are you more suggesting that I ride a few bikes, see which fits best, and that's what I should buy?

    I think in any circumstance, it's going to take getting used to the angle of riding a road bike. I have terrible posture with no back muscle in sight, so no matter what it's going to take some getting used to.

    BTW- thanks for all the help from everyone, this feedback is helping out a ton.

  19. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Piconner View Post
    That's good advice, I appreciate that. Here's probably a dumb question, but would do a ton for me. WHen I went to a local bike shop the only "fitting" they did was have me stand over the bike and see the clearance when lifted. That's how I figured out the size I need. What more custom fitting is there? I imagine just adjusting the seat/handlebars/etc. but can't you do that on both a new and used bike? Is there something I'm missing here? Or are you more suggesting that I ride a few bikes, see which fits best, and that's what I should buy?

    I think in any circumstance, it's going to take getting used to the angle of riding a road bike. I have terrible posture with no back muscle in sight, so no matter what it's going to take some getting used to.

    BTW- thanks for all the help from everyone, this feedback is helping out a ton.
    Not dumb questions at all. Quite the opposite, in fact.

    First off, that shop that had you stand over the top tube to size you doesn't have a clue, so don't go back there. Or if you do, ask for someone else to assist you.

    Unfortunately, there are less than reputable shops, so part of the buying process is to find a shop that promotes the importance of fit and test rides.

    Sizing comes before fitting, but as to fittings, there are different levels. Barring some anatomical issues/ injuries, most cyclists do fine with standard fittings included with a bike purchase. They'll generally consist of initial saddle adjustments (level/ height/ fore, aft) and adjustment to reach/ drop. Then a test ride and maybe tweaks to fit from there. Any reputable shop will include post-purchase tweaks as well - common during the acclimation process.

    Can this be done when buying used? Yes, but sizing has to be right for a fitting to go well, so that will be on you. And there's an added cost, because the bike wasn't purchased from the LBS. So, some things to consider.

    Custom fittings that you mentioned are more involved, sometime employing software/ lasers to track knee alignment, etc. and can run upwards of $100, but not something you'll have to consider right now.

  20. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Piconner View Post
    The biggest problem here is I haven't had a bike since I was 14 and it was a Kmart huffy for $120. When it comes to the ins-and-outs of this stuff, I'm completely lost.

    If this is indeed the case, I agree with PJ352 that you would be best off with a reputable bike shop. It's too bad you have found the shops in your area as not being that good. Are there any bike clubs in your area? If so, you may want to contact them and see if they can tell you which shops are better and which you should avoid. Online ratings can give you some clues too, but you need to be able to read between the lines when it comes to the negative reviews. Some are legitimate complaints and some are simply whiny customers who are never satisfied. Still others may have just caught the shop on a bad day. Of course, if there are many negative ratings, well, there's your red flag.

    Quote Originally Posted by PJ352 View Post

    Unfortunately, there are less than reputable shops, so part of the buying process is to find a shop that promotes the importance of fit and test rides.

    Sizing comes before fitting, but as to fittings, there are different levels. Barring some anatomical issues/ injuries, most cyclists do fine with standard fittings included with a bike purchase. They'll generally consist of initial saddle adjustments (level/ height/ fore, aft) and adjustment to reach/ drop. Then a test ride and maybe tweaks to fit from there. Any reputable shop will include post-purchase tweaks as well - common during the acclimation process.

    Can this be done when buying used? Yes, but sizing has to be right for a fitting to go well, so that will be on you. And there's an added cost, because the bike wasn't purchased from the LBS. So, some things to consider.

    Custom fittings that you mentioned are more involved, sometime employing software/ lasers to track knee alignment, etc. and can run upwards of $100, but not something you'll have to consider right now.
    Good info here - especially on the difference between sizing and fitting.

    Sizing is just where the salesperson positions you on a few different bikes to get an idea what size frame you take. Now keep in mind that different brands can be sized slightly different. Just like with clothing, a size 56 Cannondale may not be the same as a size 56 Trek. Some brands run large, others run small.

    Fitting isn't done until after you have decided on the bike you want. A good shop will put you and your new bike on their trainer, watch you pedal and make adjustments here and there to dial in your fit just right. This will usually involve a few body measurements including a tool they use to measure your knee angle on the longest part of the pedal stroke. Most shops will include this free with a bike purchase, but will charge you $100-200 to have this done on a bike you didn't buy there.

    The ones that use software, lasers or other high tech stuff usually cost well over $100. The well known Guru Fit costs $500, but it is questionable whether most riders really need this. I am not convinced this level of fit is necessary.
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

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  21. #46
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    Look at Fuji and Giant. They both have nice carbon bikes spec'd like the used one you are looking at for cheaper.

    Here are two to consider.

    https://www.performancebike.com/bike...400306__400306

    https://www.giant-bicycles.com/us/tcr-advanced-2

    I have tested both and they ride exceptionally. Great values IMO.
    Last edited by Rashadabd; 03-14-2017 at 09:59 AM.
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    I'm going to step back and point out that for the same price you were looking at that used Carbon Fiber bike, you can get a well equipped, new, aluminum frame model.

    I bought aluminum back in 2010 because I realized I wasn't going to be racing the bike, just riding for fitness and fun. Buying it at a $1000 discount over the equivalent carbon frame bike let me get a lot of nice gear, and an upgraded set of wheels and I was still under the price of the carbon bike. I knew I was also going to chain it up against bike racks rather frequently (gas was expensive so short 'get out' trips happened on the bike), and that appeared to be a bad idea with a carbon fiber frame. I've ridden that frame near daily since, laid it down once badly enough that I would have likely been facing replacement with a carbon frame.

    The price makes aluminum very attractive when just getting into the sport, and if a year, six months, two years later you decide you want to upgrade to carbon, you can get a carbon frameset and transfer over the parts from the aluminum bike if money is tight, for about the same price you'd initially buy the carbon bike to begin with.

    I've got to +1 on finding a good bike shop that does a good fitting. I purposely spent more (even the cheapskate I am) to buy from a shop that bent over backwards setting me up on several bikes. I had told them up front I was just testing them out, doing research, but the salesperson at the one shop *insisted* on getting me fit correctly on each bike before letting me take it out for a test ride. The other shop I went to was the "stand over the frame" type of place. Good service is good service, and is worth almost any price.
    Last edited by taralon; 03-14-2017 at 02:24 PM.

  23. #48
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Would like to thank you all for your responses and advice.
    After mos. of looking I felt a lil overwhelmed. I decided to take your advice and build a relationship with a LBS. great move. I learned so much in a cpl hours. Lots of hands on education. I now own a 2016 Jamis Ventura, tiagra group set with disc brakes. I worry if I got the best deal but the one on one service was well worth it in my opinion.
    Thank you all again

  24. #49
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Hey Guys
    Took my new Jamis out for a spin.......diagnosis..Broken Elbow. 😂😂
    Gotta Love it.

  25. #50
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Ohh no what got you? Was it trying to unclip?

    Sent from my SM-G920P using Tapatalk

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