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Thread: New bike advice

  1. #1
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    New bike advice

    Hello to everyone, I am pleased to join your community.

    It has taken me a while before I decided to post here. I have done so much reading and researching that it made more confused and puzzled. I am not new to riding, have been riding since childhood and feel very confident on any bike. But finally decided to go road biking and looking for a bike. I have come down to three endurance bikes that I am looking at, but still can not decide which way to go. Mainly I will be doing long distances for fitness myself or with friends, night join the club later. Not sure if I will ever ride in wet, unless I happen to be in a wrong place in a wrong time.

    I am considering:
    Giant Defy 2, 2017 - https://www.giant-bicycles.com/en-ca/bi ... 32/100727/
    the guy gives me a deal and sell it for CAD$ 2050
    Color either red/black or black/white/blue, red is matt, b/w/b is gloss
    Two others are 2016 and on sale:
    Felt Z5 ltd, 2016 - http://www.feltbicycles.com/Canada/2016 ... /Z/z5.aspx
    here is the exact color - http://mikesbikes.com/product/felt-bicy ... -15639.htm
    the store has it on sale for CAD$ 1600
    Focus Cayo 7, 2016 - http://www.bikeradar.com/road/gear/cate ... -15-49102/
    store has it on sale for CAD$ 1700

    All bikes have got 105 group sets. Giant has got disc brakes. I have always liked Giants, but I am not sure if I should spend extra $450? I read so much information about disc brakes/rim brakes, I don't even know what to think. One thing though, I might want to put 28 tires. They will fit Giant no problem, even 30 from what I read. Felt and Focus have got 25c and there is not much of a clearance for 28.

    I tried to do some riding, but it is really cold here in Canada. All feel fine as I never ridden proper road bikes, only cross road ones.

    Please let me know what you think. I would highly appreciate your advises.

  2. #2
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    Welcome to the group! I have a Giant Defy so I may be biased, but the Defy is a great bike for what you want to do. However Felt and Focus also make good bikes as well. There is a huge debate right now over disk brakes, but I do similar riding as you, and if I were to buy a new bike today, I'd go disk brakes.

  3. #3
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    Thank you. You are right, there is so much information about disc breaks, all kinds, so it made me really confusing. As long as adjustment and maintenance is not a problem I would go with disc brakes. I really want to buy Giant, but would not want to spend extra $500 if it does not make sense.

  4. #4
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    If you want to fit 28mm tires on your bike, your bike, your only choice is disc brakes.
    Disc brakes eliminate the brake arch over the tire, freeing up room for larger tires.

    If you can live with 25mm tires, rim brakes are fine; they have been, for decades.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter P. View Post
    If you want to fit 28mm tires on your bike, your bike, your only choice is disc brakes.
    Disc brakes eliminate the brake arch over the tire, freeing up room for larger tires.

    If you can live with 25mm tires, rim brakes are fine; they have been, for decades.
    I can easily fit 28mm tires on my rim brake Synapse, also on my rim brake Granfondo.
    use a torque wrench

  6. #6
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    I think you can actually make 28s work with rim brakes in a lot of situations, but plenty of people are still riding just fine on 23s so if your bike comes with 25s you might just want to stick with them and see how it goes.

    Don't limit yourself to just the endurance frames based on web research only... plenty of normal or "race geometry" frames are plenty comfortable.

    It may be tough to do in current weather but the more you test ride the more you'll figure out what you want.

    Disc vs rim? A lot of people against disc brakes (like me) have multiple good older wheelsets and multiple frames that we don't want to change because they are working perfectly well... hence the reluctance to switch. Seriously, I expect to get potentially decades more use out of my 2 road frames so no desire to have disc. And if I do get a new bike I want to be able to use my existing wheels.

    On the other hand, if you're getting your first road bike ever and the industry is trying to force people in the disc direction for good, it's probably not a bad thing.

  7. #7
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    Thank you. The thing is, Giant defy or TCR, don't come with rim brakes anymore. I don't think I really care what kind of brakes as long as they work fine and it does not mean more hassles, maintenance and repairs. Of course, the shop is offering two years of service, but I don't want to deal with problems. On the other hand, I see my friends who ride mountain bikes with disc brakes for years and I don't recall them talking about about any issues. I asked a friend of mine yesterday and he said he does not even pay attention while brakes are working, so far so good. I tried 25 and 28, 28s do feel more comfortable, but I am quite sure I could deal with 25s if I had no choice. In terms of test rides. I wish I could ride defy and tcr for at least 30 mins, but the best I can get is the ride around the block. May I have chosen a wrong time to buy a bike?

  8. #8
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    Any time is the right time if the prices are good

    Almost year round you can find previous year models for much cheaper and often only difference is paint job...

  9. #9
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    This year the difference is discs. I have looked at tons of bikes. 90% of 2017s models come with disc brakes, while 2016 had rims. I wish it was just paint job and group set.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by ruarmani View Post
    Hello to everyone, I am pleased to join your community.

    It has taken me a while before I decided to post here. I have done so much reading and researching that it made more confused and puzzled. I am not new to riding, have been riding since childhood and feel very confident on any bike. But finally decided to go road biking and looking for a bike. I have come down to three endurance bikes that I am looking at, but still can not decide which way to go. Mainly I will be doing long distances for fitness myself or with friends, night join the club later. Not sure if I will ever ride in wet, unless I happen to be in a wrong place in a wrong time.

    I am considering:
    Giant Defy 2, 2017 - https://www.giant-bicycles.com/en-ca/bi ... 32/100727/
    the guy gives me a deal and sell it for CAD$ 2050
    Color either red/black or black/white/blue, red is matt, b/w/b is gloss
    Two others are 2016 and on sale:
    Felt Z5 ltd, 2016 - http://www.feltbicycles.com/Canada/2016 ... /Z/z5.aspx
    here is the exact color - http://mikesbikes.com/product/felt-bicy ... -15639.htm
    the store has it on sale for CAD$ 1600
    Focus Cayo 7, 2016 - http://www.bikeradar.com/road/gear/cate ... -15-49102/
    store has it on sale for CAD$ 1700

    All bikes have got 105 group sets. Giant has got disc brakes. I have always liked Giants, but I am not sure if I should spend extra $450? I read so much information about disc brakes/rim brakes, I don't even know what to think. One thing though, I might want to put 28 tires. They will fit Giant no problem, even 30 from what I read. Felt and Focus have got 25c and there is not much of a clearance for 28.

    I tried to do some riding, but it is really cold here in Canada. All feel fine as I never ridden proper road bikes, only cross road ones.

    Please let me know what you think. I would highly appreciate your advises.
    ruarmani,

    Best advice I and realistically anyone else, can give you is buy the bike that screams "RIDE ME!" in your ear. Everything else is really aesthetics and trim, it doesn't matter if you can't fit wider tires if you don't ride it.

    Good luck and may the wind always be at your back.

    EEC
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  11. #11
    JSR
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    There is no one correct configuration. In fact, the choices are broader than ever.

    You're smart to focus on 105-level equipment. You'll get plenty of bang v buck there.

    Disc brakes are definitely not mandatory. They have, however, come of age on road bikes, IMHO. By that I mean that the designs are fairly mature and sufficiently stable that you probably won't buy something that will be obsolete in the next two years. And the weight penalty, while measurable, is not so great that you can't get a bike that performs well - especially for a recreational cyclist.

    I did a parking lot spin on the Defy and liked it a lot. It has geometry and spec that will provide satisfaction. If you eventually determine it is insufficient you will find you have become a "weight weenie" or "racer wannabe" or "cafe curmudgeon". At that point you'll be laughing at the $500 price delta as you ogle a $3000 pair of wheels.

    I've been riding for 30 years, never with a tire larger than 23c. On Sunday I ordered a Trek Domane that comes with 32c tires and discs. Of course, I'm old and fat and can't ride hard without my back screaming for relief. YMMV.

  12. #12
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    I'd recommend whichever bike allows the larger tires. I prefer rim brakes, but that choice is mine and have bicycle with 42mm tires and fenders with center pull rim brakes that gives me everything that I want in a bicycle. My set up gives me almost 2 centimeters between tire and fender, allowing room enough for all but the largest debris to pass through without hanging up. Tires much larger than my 42's will mandate disk brakes though.

    But, what ever brake system that you go with, get something that allows the use of larger volume tires, you won't regret it, 'specially if you're going with an "endurance" bike. Larger tires are not going to slow you down and will be more comfortable, allowing you to ride more miles before tiring.
    Too old to ride plastic

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    I have finally decided on Focus Cayo 7, 2016. Guys in the shop went quite far to give me a good deal and to upgrade some components. They were patiently waiting for me to make a decision, said nothing bad about Giant. Classy people. Now the bike is all 105, they tried 28mm contis and they fit well, so I take them. Spent a lot of time on fitting. I felt like I had to buy from them. The only thing they did mention, that this Focus is more of a racing geometry and the body position is more aggressive. I tried and yes, but I felt ok. I could not ride it properly though as we have got snow. So I tried it on a stand. Nevertheless, they said IF you start riding in march/april and you don't like it at all and the ride is rough, bring it back and we will get you something else. I thought it was fair enough. I hope I love this bike.

  14. #14
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    Don't get too hung up on the race or endurance geometry. More important is how it feels when you ride it. I won't hesitate to take my race geometry bike for a 6hr ride. It's a bit harsher, more engaging and responsive, but not objectionable. I'm sure you'll enjoy the focus. I think you'll probably spend a bit more time getting all the right fitment for yourself once you start riding. The initial fitment is really a general starting point, you will need to a lot of tweaks on the seats, stems, handlebars etc to get it exactly where you need it. It just takes a bit of trial and error. Also you will likely change your saddle. Most cyclist I know have never kept their original saddle as everyone is different and that contact point is the most important one of all.

    If you go through all the exercise of getting everything dialed in, and you still don't like the bike, bring it back and see what they can do for you. That kind of service is why I would go buy a new bike from an LBS.

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    Thank you guys for all your advises, much appreciated.

    Yes, they spent about an hour on fitting stand. We tried Felt and Focus. I really liked them. If it was not for the shop I would have gotten Giant.

  16. #16
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    Dealing with good people at a good shop goes a long way. You will probably love this bike, hope the snow melts soon but definitely don't take it out on icy roads...

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    Glad you picked a bike. Now we just have to hope for warm weather soon so you can get out and ride it. And yes, a good shop can make the difference when buying a bike.

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    This forum was my last source and you all helped me to make the right decision. I was really confused. The money I saved I spent on shoes, pedals and tires (I just paid for an upgrade, which is nice). Now shopping for lights. I do wait for warm weather, ha-ha. I hope my knees won't be an issue. Funny, but I feel like a child who's got himself a toy he always wanted.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by ruarmani View Post
    Funny, but I feel like a child who's got himself a toy he always wanted.
    You're not alone. That's how most of us feel when we get a new bike.
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  20. #20
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    Ha ha, I believe you.

    Told a friend of mine who rides a lot in Australia, he used to be a pro. Tried talking to him earlier to ask for his advise but could not get a hold if him, finally we spoke today and he said: "I would have bought Giant. Focus - not my thing, a little too harsh for endurance bike. But with 28mm can work better. But Giant would be the way to go. Focus is not bad ... Just cancel the order and go with Giant". He reminded me about my knee and back issues, which do occur sometime. I am 45 by the way.

    But I think no, I don't want to do this, especially guys most likely have done the upgrades on the bike. So I will stick with Focus.
    Last edited by ruarmani; 02-01-2017 at 03:58 PM.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by ruarmani View Post
    I am 45 by the way.

    He reminded me about my knee and back issues....
    I'm a fair amount older than you, ride a Specialized Tarmac and also have knee and back issues. Cycling actually helps both.

    Fit is key to success - and I suggest learning a bit about cadence. Important for everyone, but especially those with knee issues.

    Not to knock your pro rider friend, but not all cyclists are that well versed in fit. Depending on the type of back issue, it's sometimes advantageous to ride in a more aero position, minimizing weight borne on the lower back. Not radical, just 'more aero'.

    Bottom line, don't look back. The Focus gets great reviews. As you acclimate to road riding, just stay in tune with what your body is telling you, then have a fitter tweak your position, if/ when needed.

    Good luck, and ride safe!
    Last edited by PJ352; 02-02-2017 at 06:25 AM. Reason: Additions...

  22. #22
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    Thank you. Totally agree with you. I also thought that aero position would be easier on the back. Even on my cross bike I tend to get into aero position and it feels better.
    Also, I tend to see that pros often are too critical. I have already heard from him about cadence and power meter, which he has is a must if you want to train and get fit rather than simply ride for fun. These power meters cost some money I see...

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by ruarmani View Post
    Thank you. Totally agree with you. I also thought that aero position would be easier on the back. Even on my cross bike I tend to get into aero position and it feels better.
    Also, I tend to see that pros often are too critical. I have already heard from him about cadence and power meter, which he has is a must if you want to train and get fit rather than simply ride for fun. These power meters cost some money I see...
    To start, I'd suggest reading up on the topic (that's free if you use the web) and a computer with cadence, You can get a wired version for under $30. It's a good tool for beginners. After awhile, you'll begin to know what cadence feels right, but it'll take awhile.

    There's a ton of technology out there. Being 'old school' (and cheap), I keep things simple and buy based on needs, versus wants.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by ruarmani View Post
    Funny, but I feel like a child who's got himself a toy he always wanted.
    Enjoy the feeling, unfortunately it doesn't last for long, well not for me anyway.

  25. #25
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    Is this where I can get opinion about 2 bikes I am looking at on Craigslist?

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