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Thread: New Bike Help

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    New Bike Help

    Wanting to get an older used bike to ride around town, to work, and to classes. Basically just daily commutes with a backpack on. Would mostly be left unattended locked outside of classrooms, restaurants, etc. The area is fairly hilly I would say. Would a road bike or hybrid be more suitable? Or is it just personal preference

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    Quote Originally Posted by bbowdoin View Post
    Wanting to get an older used bike to ride around town, to work, and to classes. Basically just daily commutes with a backpack on. Would mostly be left unattended locked outside of classrooms, restaurants, etc. The area is fairly hilly I would say. Would a road bike or hybrid be more suitable? Or is it just personal preference
    Given the scope you offer here, to a large degree I think it comes down to personal preference. But if you broaden your uses a little (or look longer term), if longer/ charity rides and/ or touring is in your future, I think the scales would tip towards a drop bar bike.

    IMO, the link below offers some good descriptions of several types of bikes. You might find it useful in making a final decision.

    Hybrid bicycle - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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    That's what I am thinking too - because looking long term I can definitely see myself liking getting out on my bike more and wanting to ride further distances, which a road bike would be great for. But you think that would suit my purposes too for just around town travel? Only dilemma is that I am new to road bikes so they feel a lot different to me - would that be something easily overcome with just riding time on the bike?

    Awesome, thanks for the help

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    Quote Originally Posted by bbowdoin View Post
    That's what I am thinking too - because looking long term I can definitely see myself liking getting out on my bike more and wanting to ride further distances, which a road bike would be great for. But you think that would suit my purposes too for just around town travel? Only dilemma is that I am new to road bikes so they feel a lot different to me - would that be something easily overcome with just riding time on the bike?

    Awesome, thanks for the help
    I can't predict, but generally speaking I think most people can acclimate to road riding in fairly short order. Obviously, many factors (previous experiences, fitness, flexibility, sense of balance/ age, saddle time...) would influence just how long.

    Re: you question about a road bike suiting your current purposes, I think it could, but since you used the phrase 'older used bike', be careful just how old it is. The older, the better the chances of options to alter it being limited by lack of parts/ compatibility. Stay with 8 speed drivetrains and newer, and you should have no problems.

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    Okay I see, thanks. Oh definitely, I am not looking for anything extremely old, just a good decently priced used bike - money plays a factor in that but also because it will often be left unattended and locked oustide of classrooms and work and places like that. What are your thoughts on down tube shifters..which is common to run across with older road bikes..

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    Quote Originally Posted by bbowdoin View Post
    Okay I see, thanks. Oh definitely, I am not looking for anything extremely old, just a good decently priced used bike - money plays a factor in that but also because it will often be left unattended and locked oustide of classrooms and work and places like that. What are your thoughts on down tube shifters..which is common to run across with older road bikes..
    You're asking someone who from the mid '80's up till 2008 had road bikes so equipped, so suffice to say I have no problem with them.

    That said, I think the learning curve (acclimating to a road bike while using down tube shifters) is on a par with learning how to drive a car using a manual transmission. I did it so I know it can be done, but an auto transmission would've been easier.

    I understand the money constraints and how it might impact the age of bikes within you reach, thus the earlier suggestion to consider hybrids. They'll suite your short term uses and are generally cheaper. If you decide to go that route now, at some point in the future you can consider getting a tourer (or similar) for longer rides.

    Bicycling (like life) is all about compromises.

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    Ah okay fair enough. I just like to get as many opinions as possible because some people would instantly reply that I should stay away from them. However I love the retro look and feel of old road bikes. Not super old though since I am still looking for good function out of it - late 80s up into the 90's should be great. And personally I feel like if I get out in my neighborhood and get out riding I would be able to learn it without many problems.

    Ugh I know, I am slowly starting to figure that out, too many options!

    I am either going to start with a hybrid for now and if I feel comfortable on the roads then make the switch to a road bike in the future OR just find a nice fitting road bike now and jump right into getting acclimated to it. We'll see, hopefully I'll make a decision soon!

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    Difficult to tell from pics alone, but the Takara looks to be in a little better condition than the Nishiki. The latter is over priced, but the Takara probably is as well. Depending on how the seller got the 33 inch standover, both could be ~58cm frames.

    These are bikes you would want to basically buy and ride 'as is'. Meaning, they aren't worth putting money into beyond rim strips, tubes, tires and may be brake pads, cables, lubing/ greasing to get braking/ shifting smoothed out. I think that's especially true of the Nishiki, but that (again) is my impression based on a couple of pics.

    If you think they'll fit, go check them out, test ride them checking out the brakes, shifting, bearing assemblies (steering, crankset, hubs) and update your thread with your impressions. You could also ask the seller(s) if they'll be willing to have your LBS assess their overall condition.

    Personally, I wouldn't stray much over $50-$75 on the Nishiki - maybe a little higher on the Takara, but you really need to see them in person and ride them to accurately gauge their worth - and they have to fit!.

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    Yeah it is a little tough to tell, all I could find on craigslist so far though. Right, I knew they would definitely be "as is" bikes.

    Also - my LBS has a steel Schwinn Le Tour for sale in what I think to be good condition. No rust, rides smooth, tuned up and ready to go - asking $275

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    Quote Originally Posted by bbowdoin View Post
    Yeah it is a little tough to tell, all I could find on craigslist so far though. Right, I knew they would definitely be "as is" bikes.

    Also - my LBS has a steel Schwinn Le Tour for sale in what I think to be good condition. No rust, rides smooth, tuned up and ready to go - asking $275
    Given those choices and assuming the Schwinn fits your needs (and anatomy), I think going with your LBS is the better choice. You can probably work a deal where they give you some level of fit assistance and maybe a 30 day warranty.

    Just make sure the bike fits, so test ride it again if you're unsure.

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    I think so too, I am going to check it out again soon..Hm thats a good idea to try to work in a little deal with them. Sounds good thanks for the help

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    Good tips, thanks!

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