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  1. #1
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    Is it OK to ride up and down driveway ramp?

    I don't know if it's ok for the bike. Most driveway ramps, like mine, aren't perfectly flush to the street. They have a small step that cars/bikes have to go over. I don't know if going over that small step on a daily basis can damage anything on a road bike. Thanks.

  2. #2
    Bianchi-Campagnolo
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    It's ok unless you plan to slam into it.

  3. #3
    Not a rocket surgeon.
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    Uh, what?

    Yah, bumps are fine. No curb hopping but bumps are fine.
    Isnotimpressedbystoreboughtplasticbikes

  4. #4
    A wheelist
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    Learn how to unweight the front wheel as it passes over the bump and then lift the back one with the feet as it passes over. Do it right and you won't feel a thing. Do it wrong and you toast a rim. That's why you start small and work up. 4" curbs are no problem. When you get really good you can do this -

    Cyclocross Bunny Hop - YouTube

    CYCLOCROSS BUNNY HOPPING DERBY - YouTube
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    Mike T's home wheelbuilding info - dedicated to providing Newby wheelbuilder information and motivation.

    I'm not cranky; I just have a violent reaction to stupid people.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by SFTifoso View Post
    I don't know if it's ok for the bike. Most driveway ramps, like mine, aren't perfectly flush to the street. They have a small step that cars/bikes have to go over. I don't know if going over that small step on a daily basis can damage anything on a road bike. Thanks.
    Are you kidding? What are the roads like where you ride?
    "It ain't a teacup that the Queen gave you - it's a bike. Ride it!"

  6. #6
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    I do it

  7. #7
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    learn to bunny hop.

  8. #8
    Resident Curmudgeon
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    What Mike T said. That or lift weight off the saddle & use your knees as shock absorbers like when crossing RR tracks.
    Before you criticize someone walk a mile in their shoes. That way when you criticize them you'll be a mile away & you'll have their shoes.

  9. #9
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    If you're not getting a flat from pinching the tire against the rim, you're not doing any damage. The unweighting technique mentioned above is good to learn. Road bikes with properly inflated tires, of a size appropriate to the rider, can handle lots of bumps. Don't worry. Youe bike is not made of glass.

  10. #10
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    It isn't a problem; the lip on my driveway is certainly not the sharpest jar my bike takes every time I ride, unfortunately. My bike has been handling it fine for 3 years, and I'm not a lightweight.

    Unweighting is good, bike handling skills help, but it shouldn't be a problem. The bigger concern I see is hitting it at the wrong angle -- if you go in at to much of an angle (or too little, I suppose) you risk sliding a tire out along the edge. You want to approach it as perpendicular as you can (unless you're hopping up the edge to begin with). Same goes with railroad tracks, pavement joints, etc.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by tihsepa View Post
    Yah, bumps are fine. No curb hopping but bumps are fine.
    Maybe no curb hopping for you. ;)

    Very impressed by the guy bunnyhopping the full-height barriers on a slight upgrade in the first video.

    It's useful to be able to manual a road bike too, IMO. Really, the full range of MTB skills are nice to have.

  12. #12
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    I went off one of those giant high a** sidewalks with my Tarmac by accident once. I sure was scared. The bike was perfectly fine and no creaking sounds were made.

  13. #13
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    Cool thanks for the advice.

  14. #14
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    Stand up, cranks level, and lift evenly on the bars as you come into the driveway to reduce weight on the wheel. You don't need to bring the wheel off the ground, but it is easier on the wheel to drop from 2 inches than to hit a sharp edge.

    I agree that bunny hopping, pivots, bumping, track stands, environmental awareness, and other MTB skills are important on the road. I agree so strongly I wrote a book about it to share and teach some of the techniques.
    Scott Addict, Niner Jet 9, Cutter 801 CX
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  15. #15
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    I have to hit those shoulder rumble strip things they cut into the edge of highways to alert drivers they are near the shoulder. I just hope it doesnt hurt my wheels, I try to avoid it but it is not always possible. I do try to get off the seat when I hit them.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by fuzzy View Post
    I have to hit those shoulder rumble strip things they cut into the edge of highways to alert drivers they are near the shoulder. I just hope it doesnt hurt my wheels, I try to avoid it but it is not always possible. I do try to get off the seat when I hit them.
    Not to get too off-topic, but those strips are the bane of cyclists everywhere! State bike advocacy groups generally lobby to try to get the states to stop specifying the use of those. Unfortunately, once they goove the road we are stuck with it for 20 years.

    Reflective strips on the white line are still annoying, but at least they don't prevent us from riding on the shoulder.
    Scott Addict, Niner Jet 9, Cutter 801 CX
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  17. #17
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    Thanks to the OP for asking this question as I was wondering the same thing.

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