Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: Tiagra vs 105

  1. #1
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    52

    Tiagra vs 105

    As my search for a top-of-the-line entry-level road bike (take that!) continues, I am pondering the advantages of the Shimano 105 component set vs the Shimano Tiagra set. On test rides they both shift well and feel similar (don't know if I am insulting the 105 or complimenting the Tiagra).

    Question is, should I really spring for the 105 and insist upon it? Would I be OK with Tiagra and will I hate myself later if I "settle" for it? Can someone tell me the essential differences and why I really need the 105 or why I really should just save my money until the next bike? I see some bikes have a mix of both here and there. Why? I have read multiple threads over time that speak highly of the 105 set so I had really focused on bikes that had as complete a 105 set as possible. I guess I am wondering if I need to be that picky and put out the extra dough.

  2. #2
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    5
    I'm in a similar situation, and I'll probably end up with Tiagra. It may or may not be the right answer for you though, but here is my reasoning:
    1) Tiagra is cheaper and I know I'm going to need that cash for other things that I didn't think about when originally setting my budget (such as pedals, shoes, shorts, etc.).
    2) I'm not racing anytime soon, and I don't need the shifting to be super smooth. I just need the components to work, and from other's experiences I've read about, Tiagra will probably serve me well for a while.
    3) Unlike Sora, with the button downshift, the action on Tiagra is the same as the higher end components. That is to say, you move the levers the same way to shift, so I will be used to it when/if I upgrade.
    4) While Tiagra only has 9 speeds and the higher end components have 10, I don't think I'll miss the extra cog. However from what I understand, if I upgrade down the line this will force me to replace more components at once (i.e. I can't just upgrade the shifters because they'll have 10 speeds vs the 9 speed cassette). I'm willing to live with this though.

    Hope that helps, and anyone please correct me if I've got something wrong...

  3. #3
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Jeepster82's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    118

    Tiagra

    When it all boils down your paying for a weight savings. If you're buying a Tiagra 2010 /105 2010 it will save you some weight. Most comps will shift simmilar and will work for a long time as long as they are maintained propperly. I have a Tiagra set up on my 2001 Cannondale and other than the fact its nine years old it works fine.

    If its your first bike I would go with a lower grade gruppo and save some money for your upgrades. If you however are buying a higher end De Rosa frame and put some Sora gruppo on it, someone at a local ride will nock you over and steal your bike!!

  4. #4
    What the what???
    Reputation: Opus51569's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    8,445
    Quote Originally Posted by westekBike
    As my search for a top-of-the-line entry-level road bike (take that!) continues, I am pondering the advantages of the Shimano 105 component set vs the Shimano Tiagra set. On test rides they both shift well and feel similar (don't know if I am insulting the 105 or complimenting the Tiagra).

    Question is, should I really spring for the 105 and insist upon it? Would I be OK with Tiagra and will I hate myself later if I "settle" for it? Can someone tell me the essential differences and why I really need the 105 or why I really should just save my money until the next bike? I see some bikes have a mix of both here and there. Why? I have read multiple threads over time that speak highly of the 105 set so I had really focused on bikes that had as complete a 105 set as possible. I guess I am wondering if I need to be that picky and put out the extra dough.
    It depends a bit on what type of riding you plan to do. I would argue that for the vast majority of riders, Tiagra will suit your needs just fine, particularly for a first bike.
    Nothing in all the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity. - MLK

  5. #5
    Cycling induced anoesis
    Reputation: PJ352's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    12,999
    Quote Originally Posted by Inace
    I'm in a similar situation, and I'll probably end up with Tiagra. It may or may not be the right answer for you though, but here is my reasoning:
    1) Tiagra is cheaper and I know I'm going to need that cash for other things that I didn't think about when originally setting my budget (such as pedals, shoes, shorts, etc.).
    2) I'm not racing anytime soon, and I don't need the shifting to be super smooth. I just need the components to work, and from other's experiences I've read about, Tiagra will probably serve me well for a while.
    3) Unlike Sora, with the button downshift, the action on Tiagra is the same as the higher end components. That is to say, you move the levers the same way to shift, so I will be used to it when/if I upgrade.
    4) While Tiagra only has 9 speeds and the higher end components have 10, I don't think I'll miss the extra cog. However from what I understand, if I upgrade down the line this will force me to replace more components at once (i.e. I can't just upgrade the shifters because they'll have 10 speeds vs the 9 speed cassette). I'm willing to live with this though.

    Hope that helps, and anyone please correct me if I've got something wrong...
    Except for the bolded out statements in #2 and #4, IMO you pretty much nailed the differences and your logic is sound.

    RE:#2 - As long as the drivetrain is kept lubed and adjusted (required of any drivetrain), it'll perform on a par with 105. In fact, some cyclists have reverted back to 9 spd because they believe shifts are crisper.

    RE:#4 - Actually, you can upgrade just the shifters, but you'll need to route the cable through the derailleur a little differently (see link below):
    http://sheldonbrown.com/derailer-adj...html#alternate

  6. #6
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    52
    Thanks for the advice, all. As usual it has been spot-on helpful. I think if I find the right bike, like the price, and it happens to have some or all Tiagra, I will factor it into the overall decision. But I won't eliminate the bike as a choice for that reason as I may have before.

  7. #7
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    5
    Quote Originally Posted by PJ352
    Except for the bolded out statements in #2 and #4, IMO you pretty much nailed the differences and your logic is sound.

    RE:#2 - As long as the drivetrain is kept lubed and adjusted (required of any drivetrain), it'll perform on a par with 105. In fact, some cyclists have reverted back to 9 spd because they believe shifts are crisper.

    RE:#4 - Actually, you can upgrade just the shifters, but you'll need to route the cable through the derailleur a little differently (see link below):
    http://sheldonbrown.com/derailer-adj...html#alternate
    Thanks for the corrections. I didn't know about either of those points and it's very good info to know, especially the link.

  8. #8
    Descender
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    1,933
    One of my bikes has Tiagra - this is a commuter / foul weather ride that does get some abuse. It has held up fine and functions well after 900 miles.

    A good way to save money on your first ride - if you really commit to the sport you can decide what improvements to make on the next bike.

  9. #9
    The Cube
    Reputation: kmunny19's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    1,107
    Quote Originally Posted by pdh777
    One of my bikes has Tiagra - this is a commuter / foul weather ride that does get some abuse. It has held up fine and functions well after 900 miles.

    A good way to save money on your first ride - if you really commit to the sport you can decide what improvements to make on the next bike.
    this isn't bad advice overall. I'm in the process of part by part upgrading my fuji roubaix from 1st road bike status, to more competent than I am performance bike. thing is, in the end, I'll still have more weight and less stiffness than if I had bought a higher end bike in the first place, just due to the frame. I don't mind too much, because I'd have to have made a notably bigger price jump to get an improved frame AND components from a new, stock bike, but it still has some effect of limited possibilities, and in the end, it will not likely be my lifelong road bike, no matter how well I can upgrade it.

    knowing me, though, I might just do the same thing with the next bike too, but that's a long way off.

    if you're the type who must tinker, get the higher end, or you'll just tinker away the lower stuff. If you can plan on using this bike as is as a stepping stone, go tiagra and, as said, get a feel for what you want out of the next bike.
    K$

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •