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  1. #51
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    Early detection of car motion

    Learned this from a motorcyclist. If you're keeping an eye on a car that's perpendicular to you and may pull out, watch the front wheel. You can detect the motion of the wheel starting to rotate sooner than you'll notice the forward motion of the car itself. Also, if you're watching a car moving in the same or opposite direction as you, again watch the front wheel. You can see it start to turn in your direction before you'll see the car moving over. It may just be a split second advantage, but sometimes that's all it takes to save your butt...
    Last edited by ric426; 08-15-2005 at 06:11 AM.
    Cleverly disguised as a responsible adult

  2. #52
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    Thumbs up

    Ok - two tips. The first one is an opinion... the second is more of a tip.

    IMHO, The best upgrade to a bicycle is not the frame, wheels, components... the best way to improve your bicycle is to upgrade the engine.

    Here's my tip. If you have your road bike shoes on you are stranded with a disabled bike several miles from anywhere and you can't get anyone with your cell phone; take the shoe liner out of your shoes, put it in your socks and put your socks back on - with the shoe liners in your socks. That will give your feet some protection from blisters, and your calves some protection from straining. You may ruin the socks and you may even ruin the shoe inserts, but your feet will be more likely to be blister free. :-)

  3. #53
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    next time you're in a

    hotel room take the shower caps with you. I use them during rain rides. If it's cold rain it goes under the helmet. If it's warm, most of the caps fit over a helmet. you may look a like a dork, but your head is dry.

  4. #54
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    A Variation

    I use rubber bungees from Home Depot hooked over the rail to my garage door. It bounces a bit but works (for under $5).
    I yam what I yam and dats all dat I yam

  5. #55
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    Exclamation Never Ever

    NEver EVER force your pedals around when they sudenly jerk to a stop for one reason or another or SOMETHING will in your drivetrain will dynamite!!


    Dynamite: : verb
    to break apart explosively.
    dynamited: My rear derailer dynamited because I forced my bicycle pedals to complete a revolution.

    Never EVER pass moving cars on the right; especially where there are places for them to turn right without warning. Cars that are going slowly enough for you to pass them usually are getting ready for a turn in one direction or another.

  6. #56
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    Heres one that i don't think has been mentioned. Tired of carrying levers? When you get a flat use the skewer of the wheel you just took off, mkae sure you save the springs and try it first at home, don' t blame me if you're stuck confused in nowheresvillie wiht no levers. This is a major show off skill whne riding with friends.

  7. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by seahuston
    Heres one that i don't think has been mentioned. Tired of carrying levers? When you get a flat use the skewer of the wheel you just took off, mkae sure you save the springs and try it first at home, don' t blame me if you're stuck confused in nowheresvillie wiht no levers. This is a major show off skill whne riding with friends.
    One question: why? To save the 4 of 5 grams of weight that levers add you want to go through the hassle of having to take the skewers completely off AND increasing the chances of tearing the tube during a remount (especially with deep dish wheels)?
    I yam what I yam and dats all dat I yam

  8. #58
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    Sorry i was not specific enough, this is good for the days you forget the levers or to imprese a freind (this whole topic). You are right it is not worth it to never carry levers but his has gotten me out of afew jams.

  9. #59
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    Duct tape fixes everything imaginable. Tubes, seat, nice for holding cables down, replaces the broken spedometer mount...
    Somewhere down the line the math went wrong...

  10. #60
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    Cheap Stuff For Chilly Rides

    Beyond the obvious things when the weather gets cold--long sleeved jerseys, tights, fingered gloves, wool blend socks--the following are cheap and make a huge difference:

    --neoprene shoe covers
    --mesh backed vest
    --wicking skull cap and base layer (Under Armor or equivalent)

    Arm warmers are cheaper than buying a bunch of long sleeved jerseys, plus they can be taken off if the weather warms.

    The "loose fit" line from Under Armor also makes good, relatively inexpensive jerseys if you can do without zippers and pockets. Plus, they are sized for human Americans instead of pencil-like Italians. (No insult intended--I'd love to be a pencil-like Italian.)
    I yam what I yam and dats all dat I yam

  11. #61
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    Cell Phone / ICE Program

    Most of you have probably already heard of an emergency program called "ICE". It stands for "In Case of Emergency". Please see the link below. A paramedic in England started this movement. Just program the word "ICE" in front of a contact on your cell phone such as "ICE Home" or ICE Judy" ect... If you are in an accident, paramedics and doctors are trained to look for this entry in your cell phone.

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn...071700879.html

  12. #62
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    Carry two Spares

    I had a haunted Mexican Bike--if y'all remember Windsor--and it KNEW if I only had one spare and it would invariably toss two flats at me on long rides. Once I started carrying two spares, it stopped doing that. Subsequent bikes have not been haunted (or if they were, they liked me) but I never stopped carrying two spares. A spoke tool is also a necessity. On some bikes I carried spare spokes taped to one of the frame elements, that helped to ward off broken spokes. It you assume that your bike's out to get ya, you will be prepared for anything.


    Quote Originally Posted by Coolhand
    Simple stuff that's good to know:

    1. New chains come with a wax paste type covering which prevents them from rusting in the box. It is not lube and forms a gritty sandpaper paste on your chain. You need to clean it off (chain degreaser does the trick) and apply proper chain lube.

    2. Proper chain lube and chain cleaning will vastly extend the usable life of your chain, cassette and rings. Old T-shirts are great for general drivetrain cleaning.

    3. If you are road riding, you need to carry: at least one spare tube (protected from punctures in your saddlebag), at least two tire levers, a basic multi tool, a method of inflating your tires (pump or CO2 cartridge and inflator), tire patch kit or glueless patches (for double flats ect.) and at least $5 cash. That is the basics, you can carry more stuff but less then that and you will be walking home someday in uncomfortable shoes.





  13. #63
    ten cents gets you nuts
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    Arm warmers are cheaper than buying a bunch of long sleeved jerseys, plus they can be taken off if the weather warms.
    NO DOUBT. Leg and arm warmers essentially quadruple your winter wardrobe.

    Use your jersey pockets.

    Learn to trackstand, at least for the length of a stoplight.

    Get a singlespeed bike (if you don't want to go fixed) to get back to basic pedaling focus.

    Drink before you are thirsty.

  14. #64
    SEJ
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    Wink Haven't seen these yet. Enjoy!

    • Don't buy $80 winter cycling gloves. Go to a hunting store (or even Big 5) and get some winter hunting gloves. You can get the same neoprine weldes seem fleece lined gloves that the cycling companies sell - for about $25. The ones I have even have reduced thickness on the trigger finger - good for better braking feel.


    • Does your computer ever stop working in the rain? Sometimes water can get in between the computer and the contacts on the mounts. Go to the hardware store and buy some Lightbulb Grease (yes - lightbulb grease) It's a dialectric grease that conducts, but will prevent moisture from getting in. A dab on each contact and you'll never have problems again. Works great on powertaps, which are notorious for losing cadence in the rain.


    • And for the strategy how-to: Ever have a guy who just sits in during a race break? Can be frustrating. Blow your nose in your hand and wipe it on your ass. Nine times out of ten that motivates someone to take pulls (rather than look at your boogs).

  15. #65
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    where i live lots of people let their dogs roam free. if you are being chased by a snarling dog, give them a quick blast of water from a water bottle. it wont harm the dog and he wont harm you.

  16. #66
    S2H
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    Quote Originally Posted by SEJ

    • And for the strategy how-to: Ever have a guy who just sits in during a race break? Can be frustrating. Blow your nose in your hand and wipe it on your ass. Nine times out of ten that motivates someone to take pulls (rather than look at your boogs).

  17. #67
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    Lots of good tips on this thread.

    I always carry my spare tubes in a ziplock bag with a little baby powder sprinkled in. This acts as a dry lube to help fix flats on the road. Zip lock bags are also great for cell phones & anything else that can't get wet.

    I always carry a fairly small rag in my seat bag. I'ts useful for wiping hands if need be. I also lay it out flat and roll up tire levers, change, keys, etc in the rag. This keeps them from jingling / clanking when on the road.

    NEVER, EVER carry keys, or anything else sharp in your jersey or shorts pocket. In the event of a fall, even a very minor one, these can cause grevious wounds. Also don't even think about riding without bar ends. Same thing as the keys.

    I keep a 3.5 x 5 plastic laminated index card in my helmet with all pertinent info, e.g., name, address, phone, current meds, allergies, emergency contact person & any other med info that would be useful in an emergency.

    A very simple preventative maint. tip. Look at your tires before you ride. Just spin them slowly & look for cuts, imbedded objects, etc.

    The best way to check out your bike is to clean it. You get a close up look at everything if you do even a half a**ed job. I do the nasty parts, (chain, drive train), 1st. When using lube, remember that less is more. Too much just attracts dust, dirt, gravel, and defeats the purpose of lubing in the 1st place.

    When cleaning, if my bike isn't caked with mud, I use Pledge furniture cleaner. It shines great, is very easy to use, and makes your bike smell good, too. :-). I spray it on everything, then wipe. It's fast & easy. I remove the wheels, spray all the spokes hubs, rims, and even a little on the tires. No, it does NOT make your rims and or tires slippery, so the brakes work normally & the tires grip like they always did.

    One thing that really drives me nutz is squeaking cleats. I use Looks. I like them very much, but I think probably almost all cleats are a bit prone to creaking where they touch the pedal. A sure-fire fix for this is to spray both the pedal and the cleat surfaces they contact with WD40. Wipe'em off real good. If you only spray the cleats where they actually touch the pedal and wipe them off, you won't have any trouble walking on them.

  18. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scotty2Hotty
    Or you could just lean out a little bit & blow snot rockets.

  19. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bryan
    Sprinkle babypowder inside your tire at your next tube change. This prevents the tube from sticking to the tire.
    its an old wives tale. A tube sticks to the tire when the ruber is deteriorating. Temp swings from hot to cold will attribute as will age. If your tube is sticking this is a good sign its time to replace that tube.

    Some have also said that it helps prevent holes because it cuts down on friction between the tube and tire. Also an old wives tale. The tube and tire act as one because of all the pressure in there.

    until recently i've done the baby powder for years. Not noticing any more flats because of not doing it.

    best advice for a tire... inflate to 20 psi and then roll the tire off and back onto the rim all around it. this makes sure you don't have any tube pinched between the tire bead and the rim.

    inspect your tires very carefully when changing a tube. Only one thing caused your flat but there are probably a few other obstructions waiting to give you your next.

  20. #70
    jains89
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    how do you do the thing with the brakes. I cant seem to get them to stay shut. i must be missing something totally stupid.

    1. When at a stop light, if you need to move over to either side to make room for cars or other bikes, squeeze front brake lever to lock front wheel. Push forward on handlebars effectively executing a slight nose wheelie. The rear end can then easily swing right or left. Let the rear wheel land to which ever side you want to move to (if swinging to right be careful to avoid hitting right calf with chain or chainring). Release front brake and lift front end over to be parallel with rear wheel. You can use this method to lift your bike from street to curb or sidewalk.

    2. Handwritten direction on paper placed in jersey pocket can smear with sweat. Put the paper in a sandwich bag to keep it dry and readable.

    3. If your chain drops off a ring, try backpedaling 1/4 turn to re-engage chain onto ring, then pedal forward.

    4. You can park your bike upright, leaning on curb or low ledge by using a pedal and crankarm as a kickstand. To park bike on right pedal, place cranks so right pedal is between 6:30 and 8 o'clock depending on height of curb or ledge. Rest pedal on top of 4"-10"curb or ledge with wheels below level of curb or ledge with tire sidewalls touching and parallel to curb or ledge just like a parked car. Pedal and crank arm act as a kickstand, unable to rotate forward.

    5. When parking bike unlocked at convenience store or cafe, shift to big ring and little cog, then tighten down brakes all the way, so pads pinch rim. Woodbee thieves who try to ride off with it will not be able to pedal away.

    6. When enterring public place like cafe or convenience store, casually carry large water bottle in front of you, low and just below navel to shield your massive junk from innocent eyes. Or you can duct tape Lil Elvis 'tween the cheeks.

    7. Plain old vasoline acts as total wind and water proofing for legs.

    8. Coat cut off cable ends with Superglue instead of using tip caps.

    9. Applying a bead of ShoeGoo around junction of shoe sole and upper, especially at toe and heel will prevent scuffing and prolong life of shoes.

    10 Make all wheel sensor magnet adjustments off of bike, not while wheel is spinning. This takes some people a bit longer to learn than others.
    From cyclingnews.com
    Contador fractures finger
    Alberto Contador (Liberty Seguros) didn't finish Stage 6 after crashing just 1.5 km into the stage, when he tried to adjust his bike computer sensor and put his hand into his wheel. Contador was taken to hospital where he was diagnosed with an open fracture in the third joint of his right ring finger. He had 15 stitches to the finger, as well as five more in his right thumb.

    June 11 does not seem to be an auspicious day for Contador, as last year on this date he had to be operated on to relieve a brain cavernoma that put his cycling career at risk. But Contador is confident that he will be back in action in time for the Tour de France. "I believe that this time there is no risk for the Tour," he said. "Last year I missed it because of the operation, but I believe that this problem only will force me to stay off the bike a couple of days."

    Contador is the second rider from Saiz' team that has suffered an accident of this sort. In the 2000 Vuelta a Espa񡬪during the Rabassa descent in the Pyrenees, Mikel Zarrabeitia (ONCE), also put his hand into the front wheel and his finger had to be partially amputated.[/QUOTE]

  21. #71
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    Pulling Back on the Bars

    I refuse to admit how long it took me when I started to ride a road bike a lot to figure out that you really had to pull back from the bars with your arms when you wanted to generate power. I started just turning the cranks and pushed against the friction of my butt on the seat. Then one day I leaned back and pulled my arms tight from the bars--BINGO--power!! Simple to understand now but it sure was not when I started. IMO, The arms are much more active in generating power than a beginner thinks.

  22. #72
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    Tip: When changing out components be sure and grease them. (at least in most cases) In steel it reduces the chance of rusting and makes all further ins and out much easier.

    Suggestion is to join a cycling club/org...I learned more from riding a few group rides than I could have learned in a year of solo. Be sure you learn to draft properly. Nothing worse than being slammed from behind because someone did know what "slowing" meant....

    I would love to promote these guys as they have a great organization....

    http://www.cascade.org/Home/


    BTW spend the first 3 or 4 months riding in the small chainring only. This will aid you in building up a base. You'll be amazed how quick you are when you get to the big ring later.
    Last edited by ghostrider64; 03-01-2006 at 09:19 AM.

  23. #73
    Impulse Athletic Coaching
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    Quote Originally Posted by SEJ

    [list]And for the strategy how-to: Ever have a guy who just sits in during a race break? Can be frustrating. Blow your nose in your hand and wipe it on your ass. Nine times out of ten that motivates someone to take pulls (rather than look at your boogs).
    Maybe it's late or I'm too big of a noob, but that went right over me... "sits in during a race break?" "take pulls?" "boogs?" What the hell do those mean?

  24. #74
    ¡Espontaneo!
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    Quote Originally Posted by dbmcclus
    Most of you have probably already heard of an emergency program called "ICE". It stands for "In Case of Emergency". Please see the link below. A paramedic in England started this movement. Just program the word "ICE" in front of a contact on your cell phone such as "ICE Home" or ICE Judy" ect... If you are in an accident, paramedics and doctors are trained to look for this entry in your cell phone.

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn...071700879.html
    But my drug dealer's name is Ice!!

  25. #75
    ¡Espontaneo!
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    Quote Originally Posted by iliveonnitro
    Maybe it's late or I'm too big of a noob, but that went right over me... "sits in during a race break?" "take pulls?" "boogs?" What the hell do those mean?
    Uhm, I'm a noob, too, but taking a guess. "sits in during a race break" = sitting in a draft in between sprints or attacks without taking the lead, which leads to "take pulls" = pulling, or being in front and pulling those drafting behind you. The last one I know for sure, "boogs" = boogers, that crusty crap in your nose.

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