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  1. #1
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    Tire Recommendations

    I borrowed a friends Giant TCR C2. He is about the same height as me and the bike seems to fit pretty well. He currently has Michelin Pro 3 Race Tires on, new (700 x 23). I currently ride in the city of live in, and the roads are generally well paved, except for one stretch, about a half mile long, where the road is paved asphalt, old, generally uneven with small rocks.
    Can you recommend a tire to purchase that would be good for training. I am trying to build my endurance up so I can do a 50 mile road race.
    Also, is it bad for the bike to ride on this type of road?

  2. #2
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    50 mile race, or a charity ride or something? There's a big difference, and while both are great training goals, you should know that people who race 50 miles go 70 on a training ride, do speed work, etc.

    Your current tires are racing/training clinchers. So, already a great tire for your purpose. People might quibble about whether they're as great as other racing/training clinchers, but really, most are pretty comparable. My personal favorite is the Continental Grand Prix 4000.

    If you don't want to spend so much, look at the second tier that a manufacturer offers. For example, the Michelin Lithion, (have 'em on my commuter, they work great) or the Continental Ultra Race or Gatorskin. Fancy tires are one of my indulgences, I think I can tell the difference and they're more fun and more comfortable. But they can add up if you ride a lot.

    Depending on your weight, you might also consider a wider size. 25mm tires let you use a little less pressure, so if you're having to ride at max. pressure to avoid pinch flats, you'll probably be a lot more comfortable. Interestingly, they also have a little less rolling resistance.

  3. #3
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    +1 for Continental Grand Prix 4000, and +1 for 25 mm. If there are rough sections of road the added dampening from the larger tire will be a noticable benefit.

    I switched to the GP4000 in 25mm this year on our fast club ride through twisting turning neighborhoods and rough roads. Much smoother, but not slower, than the 23mm.

    Durable, less expensive options like the Conti Gatorskin and Specialized Armadillo run about half the price of the high-end tires.
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  4. #4
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    You should save your money instead of looking for different tires for a placebo effect because you read it on the Internet.

    1/2 mile of uneven surface is not going to do anything to those tires unless you are riding it like a BMX bike and aim for every hole you possibly can. I have been on mtb trails through the woods on my Schwalbe Ultremo ZX 700 x 23c and came out without a problem.

    Carry a spare tube and a hand pump in case of a pinch flat. Once you are finished with the 50 mile race, save the pump for your own bike.

  5. #5
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    Thanks for all the advice. Sounds like everyone thinks the Michelin Pro Race 3 tires are good. Rode on them today on the same ride with no issues. Just have to keep an eye out for a sale on them!!

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by 993cpe View Post
    Thanks for all the advice. Sounds like everyone thinks the Michelin Pro Race 3 tires are good. Rode on them today on the same ride with no issues. Just have to keep an eye out for a sale on them!!
    Jenson Usa had them on sale last week. But i think you mistook indifference for high praise.

    I have not tried the Michelins but have heard good and bad.

    Like one other poster said it depends what you want to do. Race or ride? Big difference in tires speed, handling and weight. As well as picture resistance and durability.
    Fastest tires I have ridden are specialized s-works turbos but not very durable or puncture resistant. Recently swapped the rear tire for a Maxxis Refuse. Incredibly tough but heavier and slower.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by 993cpe View Post
    I borrowed a friends Giant TCR C2. He is about the same height as me and the bike seems to fit pretty well. He currently has Michelin Pro 3 Race Tires on, new (700 x 23). I currently ride in the city of live in, and the roads are generally well paved, except for one stretch, about a half mile long, where the road is paved asphalt, old, generally uneven with small rocks.
    Can you recommend a tire to purchase that would be good for training. I am trying to build my endurance up so I can do a 50 mile road race.
    Also, is it bad for the bike to ride on this type of road?
    The 'which tire' question has been pretty well hashed out, but in case you missed it, here's a related thread on traversing less than ideal roads you may encounter on training rides.
    Hitting bumps at speed...?

  8. #8
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    I guess right now I am not racing. I am riding and training in the hopes of doing a 50 miler. But I would be doing it to ride and ride well, not necessarily hoping to get personal bests or things like that. Not there yet. I am a new rider just getting his feet wet.
    My main question was, should I leave on the Michelin Pro 3 Race Tires, or put on a set of more durable puncture resistant tires given the roads I ride are paved, but have areas of unevenness and rough asphalt that rolls at times. Some small potholes that I try to avoid.

  9. #9
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    I wouldn't bother swapping the tires. They're already a good-quality road tire with some puncture protection. You're training on roads. So, all set. If you manage to wear one out, you can think about it then. Tires are good for a few thousand miles, it probably won't take you that many to be able to do a 50-mile ride.

    No reason not to pick a few routes, clock yourself on them, and compare later. Since you're not doing speed work, you're most likely to see changes in things running from around 15 minutes to around an hour. I don't know how many miles that is for you, or if you have something available that's going to be pretty consistent. Traffic, traffic signals, exposure to a body of water that generates a lot of wind can all mess with your times. It's kind of fun to set new records on things, even if I'm only knocking a few seconds or a minute off, and not training especially seriously right now. Those of us who do buy expensive tires are happy enough not to compare times with cheap and expensive equipment.

  10. #10
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    993 cpe, I have riden the Pro 3 Race tires since they replaced the Pro 2's, which I rode as well. I have nothing but good things to say about them. It is all I have riden for at least 5 or 6 years. Not saying they are the best, but assuming the tires are still in good shape I see no reason for you to change out of what I have found to be perfectly good tires.

    Couldn't help but wonder from your name if you are a Porsche driver. I drove a 993 for many, many years and still luv the model. Just curious.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by 993cpe View Post
    I guess right now I am not racing. I am riding and training in the hopes of doing a 50 miler. But I would be doing it to ride and ride well, not necessarily hoping to get personal bests or things like that. Not there yet. I am a new rider just getting his feet wet.
    My main question was, should I leave on the Michelin Pro 3 Race Tires, or put on a set of more durable puncture resistant tires given the roads I ride are paved, but have areas of unevenness and rough asphalt that rolls at times. Some small potholes that I try to avoid.
    Unless you are getting flats I would leave them for now. I left my S-works until the rear wore out. Then swapped just that one.

    Enjoy the good tires, just learn how to fix a flat.

  12. #12
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    Thanks for all the tips. I just changed the front tire tube this morning. The tire was fine, but my friend put on a new front tire for me before he gave me the bike. He had a little trouble putting on the new tire, it was a little stiff, and I think he might have accidentally punctured the tube. Rode the bike 32 miles, and the next day, front tube was flat. Changed the tube, and its fine.
    Waiting to see if the Michelin Pro 3's go on sale to get a spare pair.

  13. #13
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    1996 C2, black on black.

  14. #14
    Road Bike Mike
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    Quote Originally Posted by 993cpe View Post
    1996 C2, black on black.
    love that car...unfamiliar with that tire
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  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by 993cpe View Post
    Thanks for all the tips. I just changed the front tire tube this morning. The tire was fine, but my friend put on a new front tire for me before he gave me the bike. He had a little trouble putting on the new tire, it was a little stiff, and I think he might have accidentally punctured the tube. Rode the bike 32 miles, and the next day, front tube was flat. Changed the tube, and its fine.
    Waiting to see if the Michelin Pro 3's go on sale to get a spare pair.
    If the tube was pinched during install, it would go flat sooner (probably when it pumped up to the 100 psi range). Check inside of the tire of anything sharp poking through.
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  16. #16
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    Don't buy into all the hype over buying expensive tires like the Conti 4000's, their not that great. Your a beginner rider, buy good tires at reasonable cost. I've been riding for over 40 years and raced for 10 years and 5 of those was cat 3 racing. People get too bent out of shape about tires. All I do is buy a good tire on sale or close out that will cost less then 30 bucks each from one of the several big internet discount bike stores. Once you see tires at those prices then read the reviews, if their good reviews and you can buy the tire for 25 bucks or so on sale then get those. I've had Conti 4000's and they don't last as long,nor protect from flats any better, and cut easier then the less expensive tires I get. Keep in mind I get around $60 tires for around $25, Conti never reduces their tire prices by more then 5%.

    IF you decide to enter a race then buy a set of racing tires to be used only for the racing event(s) like the Veloflex Master.

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