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  1. #1
    RangerSkip
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    Trek Pilot 2.1 vs. Specialized Sequoia Elite

    I am getting ready to purchase my first "modern" road bike at the age of 60 (got a Schwinn when I turned 40 but it is long gone). I am a former runner and mt. biker who is going to hit the open highway for rides of between 25-50 miles with the goal of doing a century ride within a year. I want a more upright position than a classic road bike frame but I don't want to sacrifice speed entirely. Any suggestions on bikes other than the two I am presently considering buying? I am willing to spend up to $1500-$1600 for a bike and I will be riding primarily on the flat roads of N.W. Florida.

  2. #2
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    I just bought a 07 Sequoia elite for $899 I gotta say "this bike rocks" It is so comfy.

  3. #3
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    My girlfriend has the Trek Pilot 2.1 and loved it until they told her they needed it at the LBS for three weeks to do a tune-up. Then she bought a Pilot 5.2 on sale which she loves too and sent me to bike repair classes.

    By the way, she is 56 and rodee 4,000 miles her first year on the road and did two centuries, including her first in 90 degrees plus. You'll be surprised how fast you will get in shape.
    IceMan
    The Bike Whisperer
    "It's hard to be me, I just make it look easy."

  4. #4
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Sprocket - Matt's Avatar
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    For what it's worth, I think you can do better than the Pilot or the Sequoia if you have $1500.
    If you still want the comfy ride, have that kind of budget, and still want something closer to race level... Try the Specialized Roubaix. I have the 04 Roubaix Elite Triple... Love it.

    I've not ridden Trek so I can't comment as to which model would compare to the Roubaix.
    You can ride a BIG WHEEL as long as it puts a smile on your face.

  5. #5
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    Whatever you end up with, DON'T let them cut off the steerer tube UNTIL you figure EXACTLY how high you want your bars to be. Wish I'd known enough to do that with my Roubaix. Other than that issue, it's plenty comfortable, but still scoots. If I were in flat ol' Florida still, think I'd just ride a fixie, or at least a SS, and be done with it.

  6. #6
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    Something with a compact crank instead of a triple crank may be worh considering. If you are riding mainly the flat roads of Fla, then a triple won't do you much good. A compact shoould give you plenty of gears, especially if it is a 10 sp rear set up, and it will shift better, as well as save weight. The Specialized roubaix is available with a compact, in both aluminumframed and carbon framed models. Also, check out Cannondale's Synapse line of bikes. They are "comfort" type race bikes similar to the roubaix with higher than normal postioning. I've owned both the Specialized Roubaix carbon and Cannondale Synapse carbon and have found that the Synapse offers a much smoother ride than the Roubaix, although the Roubaix does offer a taller headtube for a more upright position. I can't comment on the Trek line of comfort bikes, though they undoubtably offer some fine choices also. Check them all out and see what you like best!

  7. #7
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Sprocket - Matt's Avatar
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    I'm in INDY and I have the triple...
    Indiana & at least the part of Orlando that I was in for 7 years.... you won't need a triple, cyclust is right a compact would be more than enough gearing for Florida.

    I have it cause this is my primary road bike, and I take it to Colorado to see a buddy of mine, Western North Carolina on Vacation, and also up to see family in the white mts. of New Hampshire....
    You can ride a BIG WHEEL as long as it puts a smile on your face.

  8. #8
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    I am 52 and bought the Trek Pilot 2.1 last May. I am not far from you in Cairo, Ga which is in SW GA. I ride regularly with a group of guys each week. Usually 100 miles a week. I have 2700 miles on the Pilot. I am just as fast as any bike in our group. I don't use the lowest gear on the triple too often but when I need it I like having it up the hills. If you live near Quincy, Florida there are plenty of hills in that area. Granted it's not the mountains.

    I have added a new saddle, look pedals, and a pair of Neuvation wheels so far. The wheels made a big difference. I roll down hill faster than any in our group and I only weigh 153 lbs. The Look Keo's are much better than the stock ones. My only complaint is this creaking sound when really putting pressure on the pedals. Have tried to figure it out but to no avail. Other than that it's been fine.

  9. #9
    Cycling induced anoesis
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    Quote Originally Posted by Syrupmaker
    I am 52 and bought the Trek Pilot 2.1 last May. I am not far from you in Cairo, Ga which is in SW GA. I ride regularly with a group of guys each week. Usually 100 miles a week. I have 2700 miles on the Pilot. I am just as fast as any bike in our group. I don't use the lowest gear on the triple too often but when I need it I like having it up the hills. If you live near Quincy, Florida there are plenty of hills in that area. Granted it's not the mountains.

    I have added a new saddle, look pedals, and a pair of Neuvation wheels so far. The wheels made a big difference. I roll down hill faster than any in our group and I only weigh 153 lbs. The Look Keo's are much better than the stock ones. My only complaint is this creaking sound when really putting pressure on the pedals. Have tried to figure it out but to no avail. Other than that it's been fine.
    Check out classic forums>components, wrenching>squeaks of unknown origin. I think you'll find the advice there helpful.

    Off the cuff (and I could be way off on this), I'd say there's a good chance the creak is from your bottom bracket (bearings), but sounds travel on bikes so as i said, I could be way off. Also, if you could swap the pedals for another pair to test your theory, that would be a start.

  10. #10
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    Thanks for the advise. I suspect the bottom bracket as well. When I coast there is no creaking. Have not thought about the pedals. I could put the stock ones back on and see. I haven't taken it back to the shop because I hate to be without the bike too long. I know a lame excuse.

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