Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 35
  1. #1
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    30

    Worried about my rims because of my weight.

    So, just got my first road bike. I'm now at a massive 245lbs (I'm 6'1"). The bike I got has Bontrager Select rims. 20 spoke.

    Today was my first ride and I was going down a steep hill and every crease in the road was making me nervous that these skinny little rims were going to fold on me or explode or something.

    Are my fears founded? Should I get heavier/stronger rims for my weight?

  2. #2
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    577
    I can't tell you anything about your specific Bontrager rims. I'm sure you'll have most people recommending heavier duty rims/spoke counts, etc. Maybe not a bad idea.

    What I can tell you is that I've been as heavy as 265# on the bike, and presently at about 240#, and I've not had any problems w/ my stock (presumably cheap) 20/24 spoke rims on my Jamis. I was concerned when I bought the bike, LBS owner said don't worry about it, and if I had problems, he'd help me out with a new set of wheels. I've lost 2 spokes, that's it. Over 4500 miles, plenty of high speed descents, fast corners, potholes and all the stuff that comes with daily commuting.

    Good luck!
    '13 Felt Z4 for the road

    '11 Specialized Enduro Expert for the trails

  3. #3
    Cycling induced anoesis
    Reputation: PJ352's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    12,234
    As (I think) Ty demonstrates, ride weight alone doesn't tell the entire story of wheel durability. Tire size/ construction, riding style and road conditions also play a part.

    Time will tell whether those rims will prove durable, but I share your concern of a failure, especially on high speed descents. If it were me, I'd look to a 32 spoke count wheelset like the Velocity Deep V's/ 105 or Ultegra hubs or Mavic OpenPro's with the same hubs. Odds are good that either will be more durable than the Bonty's.

    EDIT: I'm not very familiar with the Bonty wheelset lineup, but if yours have paired spokes, that would be another good reason to upgrade. Not a stellar record for durability.
    Last edited by PJ352; 03-22-2012 at 04:25 PM. Reason: Addition..

  4. #4
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    2,851
    Quote Originally Posted by Wildewinds View Post
    So, just got my first road bike. I'm now at a massive 245lbs (I'm 6'1"). The bike I got has Bontrager Select rims. 20 spoke.

    Today was my first ride and I was going down a steep hill and every crease in the road was making me nervous that these skinny little rims were going to fold on me or explode or something.

    Are my fears founded? Should I get heavier/stronger rims for my weight?

    -yes
    -and/or more spokes and if your bike came with 23s bigger tires too.

  5. #5
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    2,280
    mavic open pros, 32 spokes and ultegra hubs. you can't go wrong with this combination.

  6. #6
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    2,851
    Quote Originally Posted by tystevens View Post
    I can't tell you anything about your specific Bontrager rims. I'm sure you'll have most people recommending heavier duty rims/spoke counts, etc. Maybe not a bad idea.

    What I can tell you is that I've been as heavy as 265# on the bike, and presently at about 240#, and I've not had any problems w/ my stock (presumably cheap) 20/24 spoke rims on my Jamis. I was concerned when I bought the bike, LBS owner said don't worry about it, and if I had problems, he'd help me out with a new set of wheels. I've lost 2 spokes, that's it. Over 4500 miles, plenty of high speed descents, fast corners, potholes and all the stuff that comes with daily commuting.

    Good luck!

    I wouldn't call losing a spoke every 2250 miles not having any problems. that's pretty horrible actually.

  7. #7
    Winner!
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    296
    I wouldn't worry about it, just don't smack potholes

  8. #8
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    48
    I wouldn't worry about it. I was 282 a month ago, and didn't have any problems. The good news, I am down to 260 through riding and eating right. (and cutting down on the beer!)

  9. #9
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    30
    Well, I guess I think I'll keep my eyes open for a good deal on a wheelset, but stay with what I have unless I notice something bad.

    Thanks for the advice. Especially from the big guys.

  10. #10
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    577
    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Strongbow View Post
    I wouldn't call losing a spoke every 2250 miles not having any problems. that's pretty horrible actually.
    Well, maybe, but the failures haven't been catastrophic, and the repairs have cost me all of $15 (new spokes and truing). And they have both been in the last 500 miles or so. One popped out on the front wheel during a standing climb of a very steep short hill near my house, presumably due to some "massive torque" on my standing climb. Not sure about the other, as I was on the rear wheel as I was "just riding along" as they say. Seems I hear common reports of lighter riders losing spokes, truing wheels and all of that on a regular basis. Also, FWIW, I've never lost a spoke in 12 years of riding mtbs, again on stock wheels.

    All I'm saying is that I'm glad I didn't run out and buy $250+ wheels for my bike right off the bat.
    '13 Felt Z4 for the road

    '11 Specialized Enduro Expert for the trails

  11. #11
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    139
    I have the stock RS 3.0 wheels that came on my CAAD 8 105 with 120 miles so far and no problems yet. I might need to get them trued since it seams there is a little wobble but im 270 lbs so i expect to have that happen.
    2012 CAAD 8 105

  12. #12
    Resident Curmudgeon
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    14,094
    If your bike shop is backing you I'd go ahead and use them. If they don't work out for you my suggestion is to get some Velocity Deep Vee rims. They are high quality, good looking rims that are available in all colors of the rainbow, and they're strong enough that in an emergency they could be used as a spare on a logging truck.
    Velocity - Content Template
    Don't believe everything you think.

  13. #13
    Hold on I'm watching this
    Reputation: Squrkey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    352
    Quote Originally Posted by FatMike View Post
    I wouldn't worry about it. I was 282 a month ago, and didn't have any problems. The good news, I am down to 260 through riding and eating right. (and cutting down on the beer!)
    Congratulations! I hope to lose some weight, 22 lbs in a month is incredible. How often do you ride? You might have to change your user name.

  14. #14
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    48
    Thanks Squrkey! I looked back and it has actually been 6 weeks not a month, but I feel better already and still have 25 pounds to go!

  15. #15
    Carless
    Reputation: Trower's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    288
    Until you get a different wheelset run the biggest tires your frame will allow! They will give you some extra insurance against damage. 28c is nice and really don't slow you down much anyhow!
    Last edited by Trower; 03-24-2012 at 06:57 AM.

  16. #16
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    4,767
    Catastrophic failure's not particularly likely.

    You'll pull the spokes through the rims sooner or later. But it'll take time, and shouldn't cause anything catastrophic either.

    If Trek wants to keep giving you new rims and wheels when it happens, consider it their idiot tax, or maybe a loss leader for their marketing people wanting cool looking wheels.

    If you have to pay for new wheels yourself, get something more conservative. One of my friends does only 36-spoke wheels, including on racing bikes, because they're stronger and as far as he's concerned, four extra spokes (over the default 32) isn't going to make him lose a race, it'll be his fitness. And vice versa. For myself, I'm happy enough with 32-spoke wheels. I'm a lot smaller than both my friend and you, though - about 165 right now, but hopefully 145 if I manage to compete this summer.

  17. #17
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    50
    I broke quite a few spokes on my jamis before i upgraded the wheels to velocity chukkers. 36 hole shimano 105 hubs. 14 gauge dt Swiss spokes Running a size 28 tire. I started out at 310 lbs (now 285). The wheelset is so strong. I feel pretty confident on the bike now. I can his some cracks in the road take dips, all with confidence. To be honest, an uberclyde like me? The last thing to worry about is how much added weight it adds to the bike, because I'm slowly losing weight. Which is the purpose. When I get to my goal. I'm going carbon with 2 spokes ;).

  18. #18
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    66
    CAAK
    --------- __o
    ------- _`\<,_
    ------ (*)/ (*)
    ---------------

  19. #19
    Hanging 10 bra
    Reputation: scottzj's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    1,125
    I understand your concern, when I started cycling I was close to 310 and didnt like the feel of a road bike esp with the small tires. I have since lost around 121lbs in the past couple years but during the weight loss I bought a set of the reynolds 38. I was still around 240 and they seemed to hold up pretty good. However, it did make me feel better to get below the threshold of the spec for the wheels. You could always find you a larger spoke count wheelset to ride until you get below the comfortable weight for those wheels. Good luck and keep on rollin!

  20. #20
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    3
    Bah I'm 6'5 and around 250 with not much weight to lose. My wheels go out of true like crazy so I'm thinking about finding some 36 spoke rims which I hope will solve the problem.

  21. #21
    Resident Curmudgeon
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    14,094
    I don't know what the spoke count of your present wheels are, but I'm positive you could get by with stronger rims & 28 or 32 spokes. Take a look at Velocity Deep Vees or Velocity Arrowheads.
    Don't believe everything you think.

  22. #22
    Cat 6
    Reputation: rose.johnp's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    297
    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch View Post
    Catastrophic failure's not particularly likely.

    You'll pull the spokes through the rims sooner or later. But it'll take time, and shouldn't cause anything catastrophic either.

    If Trek wants to keep giving you new rims and wheels when it happens, consider it their idiot tax, or maybe a loss leader for their marketing people wanting cool looking wheels.

    If you have to pay for new wheels yourself, get something more conservative. One of my friends does only 36-spoke wheels, including on racing bikes, because they're stronger and as far as he's concerned, four extra spokes (over the default 32) isn't going to make him lose a race, it'll be his fitness. And vice versa. For myself, I'm happy enough with 32-spoke wheels. I'm a lot smaller than both my friend and you, though - about 165 right now, but hopefully 145 if I manage to compete this summer.
    I weigh 210lbs and have gone through 2 sets of Bontrager Lites. The both sets I went through 3-4 spokes before eventually the spoke was pulled through the rim. In Hawaii the roads are very bad. Being bigger guys, we really need to focus on keeping our big butts off the saddle when we hit those rough spots.

    A heavier duty rim (particularly the back) and a wider tire will help.

    I would ride em until they're dead- then consider looking for a stronger / better suited rim.

  23. #23
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    4
    I just got my bike a week ago and I would have never thought of my weight (235) being an issue with the rims. Glad I ran across this thread.

  24. #24
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    50
    Quote Originally Posted by shealy06 View Post
    I just got my bike a week ago and I would have never thought of my weight (235) being an issue with the rims. Glad I ran across this thread.
    This forum. Particularly the beginner section helped me pick my bike and my wheel set up. Everyone is so helpful.

  25. #25
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    246
    I, for one, would have no patience for all these broken spokes. I frequently do lengthy rides in the country and I must be able to make it home. A set of wheels strong enough for a big guy (I'm 6'5'' 245 myself) can be had for a few hundred dollars. The peace of mind is well worth it. After all, what good is a beautiful bike if you have to carry it home?

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Sea Otter Classic

Hot Deals

Contest


Latest RoadBike Articles


Latest Videos

RoadbikeReview on Facebook