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  1. #1
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    Worse than buying a new car

    I have went back and forth every time I have told myself I decided between the two bikes I am looking at. Currently I am looking at two of Scott's bikes, the Metrix 20 or the Speedster S50.
    This will be my first higher end bike, so I want to make the right decision. Let me give you the details.
    I want to use it for a commute (about 5-10 miles), general exercise, an induction get into longer riding. I also have two children that I want to be able to ride with as well, and possible rides on rails to trails. From what I understand a road bike wouldn't handle rails to trails well. Will the 28 series tire on the Metrix 20?
    Am I better off getting the road bike and possibly just a mtn bike for rides with the kids? Help me out.

  2. #2
    Call me a Fred
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    Get a cyclocross bike. They are more rugged than a road bike, but are more comfortable on the road than a mountain bike. That being said, I've done metric centuries on a mountain bike and trails on a road bike.
    Mike

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  3. #3
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    I agree with the Cyclocross bike. Several companies are introducing new cross bikes with disc brakes and fender mounts/rack mounts for when you are commuting. I looked at the Specialized TriCross Elite disc which had the SRAM Apex group and loved how it felt just not crazy about SRAM myself. Felt also has one in all black with white letters that looks sharp but ti did not have the rack/fender mounts. The F65X and it was a mean looking machine. I think we will see a lot more of these in the near future for exactly what you are describing. Good luck!

  4. #4
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    I would second Mike's recommendation on a cyclocross bike but a road bike that fits 28 tires would be ok too.

  5. #5
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    LOL, you have enough posts for your own thread now.

    In the grand scheme of things, it's really not that important. I definitely had a harder time getting a car than I ever have with bikes. They're less expensive, if you buy them used they hold their value pretty well, and I tend to chew sporting goods lately. And, it's a lot easier to find out what the real price is.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by seand@wandrn.com View Post
    I agree with the Cyclocross bike. Several companies are introducing new cross bikes with disc brakes and fender mounts/rack mounts for when you are commuting. I looked at the Specialized TriCross Elite disc which had the SRAM Apex group and loved how it felt just not crazy about SRAM myself. Felt also has one in all black with white letters that looks sharp but ti did not have the rack/fender mounts. The F65X and it was a mean looking machine. I think we will see a lot more of these in the near future for exactly what you are describing. Good luck!
    Not sure what this SRAM stuff you talk about is??? Guess I need to check out these Cyclocross bikes. I haven't even considered them, but think I passed by a few in the shop judging from what you are saying they are. Am I looking at more money or about the same for one of these?

    Thanks everyone for this help. Like I said, just want to be happy with my first purchase. I can see that I will probably be wanting to own multiple bikes soon, but don't have the dough for 3 or 4 right now. Again, thanks for all the feedback.

  7. #7
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    Awesome info. I am going to check out these Cyclocross bikes. Haven't really looked at them. What's the best entry level/value one of these and what price range should I be in? If I was looking at $700-$800 on the others will I be looking at a decent one of these?

  8. #8
    Not a rocket surgeon.
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    Quote Originally Posted by spidr62 View Post
    Awesome info. I am going to check out these Cyclocross bikes. Haven't really looked at them. What's the best entry level/value one of these and what price range should I be in? If I was looking at $700-$800 on the others will I be looking at a decent one of these?
    Generally cross bikes and road bikes will run about the same price for how they are equiped. I have a cross bike with 28's just for the rails to trails. Its a great ride.

  9. #9
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    I agree that the choices are a little overwhelming.

    The internet can be a great resource, if you've got the time to do a lot of reading and to sift through the (often conflicting) advice given, and if you are a "do it yourself" type. This is what I did for my last bike purchase, but then I'd been riding "seriously" (i.e. >= 3000 mi/yr) for several years and I had a pretty good idea of the type of riding I was going to do on the bike.

    Another way to go is to visit a couple of bicycle shops and describe your needs. The bike shop people may have better advice than anonymous people on the web, and a decent shop will be able to help you get a bike that fits you. It is a little like car shopping in that you need to be careful that the shop isn't just selling you what is on the floor, irrespective of your actual needs. It can be a good idea to look up any cycling clubs in your area and get some advice from the members on which shops are good. Also, if you know anyone who does a lot of cycling then they may be able to help you out with a good local bike shop (LBS). If you can give your general location, there may also be people here on this forum (and/or on the regional forums) that can recommend some shops.

    Have fun, and don't worry too much about getting the "wrong" bike. As long as the bike fits you and you ride it, your choice cannot be "wrong". Nearly everyone who gets seriously into this sport ends up lusting after other bikes, even if they keep riding the one(s) they have.




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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by tihsepa View Post
    Generally cross bikes and road bikes will run about the same price for how they are equiped. I have a cross bike with 28's just for the rails to trails. Its a great ride.
    What about riding these cross bikes on the road, will I be wearing down a tire or are they different than a MTN bike tire?

    Quote Originally Posted by D&MsDad View Post
    I agree that the choices are a little overwhelming.

    The internet can be a great resource, if you've got the time to do a lot of reading and to sift through the (often conflicting) advice given, and if you are a "do it yourself" type. This is what I did for my last bike purchase, but then I'd been riding "seriously" (i.e. >= 3000 mi/yr) for several years and I had a pretty good idea of the type of riding I was going to do on the bike.

    Another way to go is to visit a couple of bicycle shops and describe your needs. The bike shop people may have better advice than anonymous people on the web, and a decent shop will be able to help you get a bike that fits you. It is a little like car shopping in that you need to be careful that the shop isn't just selling you what is on the floor, irrespective of your actual needs. It can be a good idea to look up any cycling clubs in your area and get some advice from the members on which shops are good. Also, if you know anyone who does a lot of cycling then they may be able to help you out with a good local bike shop (LBS). If you can give your general location, there may also be people here on this forum (and/or on the regional forums) that can recommend some shops.

    Have fun, and don't worry too much about getting the "wrong" bike. As long as the bike fits you and you ride it, your choice cannot be "wrong". Nearly everyone who gets seriously into this sport ends up lusting after other bikes, even if they keep riding the one(s) they have.
    ---------------------------------------
    Been doing what I can on the web. Been in a Sun & Ski Sport bike shop with some pretty knowledgable people the last 4 days. They don't seem too pushy. I am in the Nashville area. Hoping to have a bike soon. Really enjoying this forum for info.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by spidr62 View Post
    Not sure what this SRAM stuff you talk about is??? Guess I need to check out these Cyclocross bikes. I haven't even considered them, but think I passed by a few in the shop judging from what you are saying they are. Am I looking at more money or about the same for one of these?

    Thanks everyone for this help. Like I said, just want to be happy with my first purchase. I can see that I will probably be wanting to own multiple bikes soon, but don't have the dough for 3 or 4 right now. Again, thanks for all the feedback.
    Sram is one of three major groupset companies, along with Shimano and Campagnelo.

    Basically, they make the shifters, gears and some other components. You will mostly see Shimano and Sram. I prefer Sram, but it is personal preference.

    On your other question, with the cross bike, switch up the tire or better yet buy a second set of wheels for road tires. That way you can switch easier than changing tires. Or a 28 or 32 road tire would probably work.

  12. #12
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    Maybe I'm just justifying myself but I find that if I'm at the point of considering a second set of wheels for a bike to do a different job, I'm actually better just buying a second complete bike. At least, if one job is something a 'B' or 'C' bike can handle. Wheels worth buying aftermarket cost a couple hundred dollars. Or more, but you can get a pretty serviceable wheel for not too much money these days. However, there's a massive inventory of used bikes out there, available, complete with wheels, for less.

    What kind of surface do your rails-to-trails have? Some of mine have beautiful, smooth asphalt and some are really just doubletracks with an entry on a bike map. For the first, there's no reason at all to change tires, and for a mix, you'd be surprised how well you'll do with 25mm or 28mm slick road tires, so no having to swap. For sustained dirt or gravel riding, knobby tires do become better.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch View Post
    Maybe I'm just justifying myself but I find that if I'm at the point of considering a second set of wheels for a bike to do a different job, I'm actually better just buying a second complete bike. At least, if one job is something a 'B' or 'C' bike can handle. Wheels worth buying aftermarket cost a couple hundred dollars. Or more, but you can get a pretty serviceable wheel for not too much money these days. However, there's a massive inventory of used bikes out there, available, complete with wheels, for less.

    What kind of surface do your rails-to-trails have? Some of mine have beautiful, smooth asphalt and some are really just doubletracks with an entry on a bike map. For the first, there's no reason at all to change tires, and for a mix, you'd be surprised how well you'll do with 25mm or 28mm slick road tires, so no having to swap. For sustained dirt or gravel riding, knobby tires do become better.
    Moving back to PA soon. Rails to trails there are mostly packed pea gravel. How does a 28 tire do on those?

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by spidr62 View Post
    Been doing what I can on the web. Been in a Sun & Ski Sport bike shop with some pretty knowledgable people the last 4 days. They don't seem too pushy. I am in the Nashville area. Hoping to have a bike soon. Really enjoying this forum for info.
    Sorry, don't know anything about Nashville, or Pa.

    Sun & Ski Sport may well be what you need, but I would encourage you to go to a variety of shops, including shops that specialize in bicycles. IMHO, the bike shop matters a whole lot more than the particular brand(s) of bike they stock. I would encourage you to shop for a bike shop FIRST, and find one that is trustworthy and competent. Then have them help you select and fit the particular bike that fits your current needs.

    One way that could help you to evaluate the shop would be to ask them about their fitting process. If they just go by standover height, then there is the possibility that you could walk out with an ill-fitting bike. If they will work with you to optimize the frame size, stem length, bar width and drop, saddle height and setback, etc. then that is a higher level of service that increases the likelihood that you will get a bike that fits you properly.

    Another thing you want to pay attention to is the questions that they ask you. If you go in and say "I'm shopping for a bicycle", they should ask you what type of riding you're interested in doing, what you've done in the past and how you liked it, what previous bikes you've owned, what other things you might like to do with the bike (e.g. commuting, riding with kids, touring, errands around town, exploring trails, going on bike paths, road biking/racing, etc.), what kind of mileage you are planning on doing, what your goals are (e.g what kind of riding and/or mileage that you might eventually want to do), and the like. The fewer questions they ask, the less likely it is that they will match you with a bike that meets your needs and desires.

    Getting a bike that makes you happy is the primary consideration. If you're happy with the shop you're going to and happy with the choices and advice they've given you, then by all means go with your judgement.




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  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeBiker View Post
    Get a cyclocross bike. They are more rugged than a road bike, but are more comfortable on the road than a mountain bike. That being said, I've done metric centuries on a mountain bike and trails on a road bike.
    I disagree. Any decent road bike should handle gravel roads/paths just fine. He didn't say he wanted to off-road it. Cyclocross bikes will be heavier and have cantilever brakes and have a higher BB which affects the handling. I'd go for a good road bike instead.

    Annual race here in Boulder. Pretty sure none of the pros use a cyclocross bike and most are running 23 tires. I rode it one year with a road bike with 28s and got smoked. The wide tires were overkill and too heavy.

    2012 Boulder Roubaix Highlights | 303Cycling News
    Last edited by Bocephus Jones II; 04-17-2012 at 08:00 AM.
    "I regard the brain as a computer which will stop working when its components fail. There is no heaven or afterlife for broken down computers; that is a fairy story for people afraid of the dark." -S. Hawking

  16. #16
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    So-so. It's incredibly irritating. On that surface, I like to have the biggest tires I can get my hands on. I can (usually) still get through it on a road slick, but I wouldn't want to do any extended riding that way.

    If you're about to move, this may not be the right time to buy a bike. Depending on how you're moving your stuff, it can be a big pain. I used UPS when I changed coasts, and the bikes alone were pretty expensive items. Not prohibitive, but worth considering. I've been trying to re-integrate running since running shoes fit in a piece of carryon baggage.

  17. #17
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    Appreciate all the info from all of you. After going and check out the Kona Jake, I know the cross bike is for me. I now feel confident about that and less stressed out about buying the wrong bike. Now just need to decide on brand. Really like the Jake but looking at a few others and seeing what kind of deal I can seal. Thanks again to all.

  18. #18
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    I have a Jake. It's a previous-generation model, so probably not very representative, though.

  19. #19
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    Saw the Kona Jake out on the road today with another Kona which looked bad ass but I think it was a single speed. The HonkyTonk may be right up your alley since the MSRP is under 1k Watch out, once the bug hits you it is hard to stop...

  20. #20
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    Looks like it will be the 2012 Trek Ion CX for $1350. Can't pass up that offer. Picking it up tomorrow.

  21. #21
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    2012 Trek Ion CX

    Just picked it up. $1350 out the door. Think someone may loose their job. Lovin' it.
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