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  1. #1
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    Trek Madone 5.2 or Bianchi FG Lite

    I am wavering back and forth between the Bianchi and the Trek. The reason for the wavering is because I want an Italian frame but I also want to be patriotic and buy an American frame.

    I am going to have to decide this a different way. Which frame do you guys think is better, or which frame is better for what (e.g., climbing, comfort, power).

  2. #2
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    you'll probably get little sympathy with your dilemma of buying a Trek frame in a Bianchi orum...

    however, seeing as thse two frames are sort of both at different ends of the spectrum. one usa carbon the other italian aluminum, my views follow...

    i think fgLite does not warrant price for aluminum frame, therefor I'd go for trek, even though I am at the opposite end of your spectrum towards pattitism and the USA.

    as these 2 bikes seem completely different I would say you are not certain on whatyou want, which is not surprising, as decisions are hard to make. so if you get the trek, you have a huge markt to resell it if it does not meet your expectations. if you go with bianchi, resale market is smaller.

    in breif, trek would be a sweet ride : bianchi fgLite seems overpriced for alu.

  3. #3
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    Thanks Phil.

    Yeah, I am not sure whether I want an aluminum frame or a carbon fiber frame. I have been debating between the 928 and the FG Lite too. Heck, I am hoping that I have enough money next year to build the 928.

    The reason I am leaning toward aluminum and a stiffer frame is because I am used to riding a steel frame. I bought that bike when I was a junior USCF rider and it is now 20 years old. It was a sweet ride when I initially got it (i.e., Columbus SLX tubing, Campy Super Record, and Campy tubular wheels), but now I am really tired of it, especially the non-indexed shifting and the 6 speed freewheel.

    While I do not race anymore, I am thinking about getting back into it, and I am worried that a carbon frame just will not be stiff enough for hill climbing or sprinting. My other issue is that I do not like Shimano, so I would have to get the Trek Madone 5.2 frame which retails for $1,999 and then build the bike with SRAM or Campy. So, that makes the Madone 5.2 a little more expensive than the FG Lite. I also looked at some Colnago frames and they must be made of gold because their price is out of this world. Same goes for Pinarello.

  4. #4
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    i use to salivate over all the frames and it drove me mad, i loved the FGLite and full carbon bikes. it didn't stop there, it was fast becoming a dangerous habit. anyhow, I ended up getting a powertap hub and when I could see the real figures I was putting out it made me stop thinking about frames and just work on my power output.

    I did by a new bianchi frame recently albeit a 2002 sl lite alloy for abot $350USD and it has all the italian styling in its inimitable celeste green(or blue? green?).

    my, advice, if you are a Walter Mitty typelike most cyclists myself included, go for the powertap and a medium range bike. That way you will most DEFINITLEY know when to progress to a full carbon frame.


    the new 2007 centaur range is looking sweet. on par with record 06 probably. you could that built up on a bianchi new for a pretty sweet deal i'm sure.

    p.s. i now spend my time crunching power stat numbers and salivating over rims to build my hub onto, oh, and the odd bike ride too =)

    p.s. I was reading about stifness of frames and they say the numbers are not critical, just get a test ride and make sure it meets up to your standards.
    on the bianchi.com forum there are a couple o stories about extremely flexy FGLites. carbon is stif as you like too.

  5. #5
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    Uh, are Trek Madones made in the US?
    Last edited by 8200rpm; 07-30-2006 at 10:31 AM.

  6. #6
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    Smile Trek Madone or FG?

    Hello fabsroman. I just bought an FG lite, and hoping to start riding it in about a week.
    Here's my input. I think both bikes are great. My reasons are simple for going with the FG lite
    1) My favorite bike store carries Bianchi not Trek. This store is amazing!
    2) I have a giro that fits me well and wanted the same geometry
    3) Although some say "it's just an Aluminnum frame" I beg to differ. It's obvious that Bianchi has been around a long time. They have a lot of knowledge on how to build a steel or aluminum frame. Material is one thing, but the builder is another. The FG has large chain stays which really help with stiffness and energy transfer. (I have never heard about them being flexy, my giro is a little flexy in all sprint, but with SL's it's not that bad. Another words, if I loose the sprint or climb it's not the frame!
    4) I race and just like riding aluminum vs. other materials. I can afford this frame, v.s. other pro level frames I can't even think about purchasing.
    5) I didn't want a bike that "everyone else has" (can't believe that would even bother me...but it does)
    6) Wanted to build a bike with certain components in mind.
    7) Well, the pros ride the frame and I know they have a lot more power than I will ever have.

    Good luck and I am sure whatever you get you will happy. I took a very long time to decide and rode many bikes and in the end it was quite simple, I am happy with my bike store as well as the brand.
    Now, I hope I can win a race..that's a different story.

  7. #7
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    I think all of Trek's high end frames are actually made in Wisconsin where their main headquarters are. I read that in another post from somebody else, so do not take it as complete fact.

    I have been debating which bike to get for a little over a month now, and I think I have settled on the Orbea Opal. It is supposedly a super stiff frame with a smooth carbon ride. I went to test ride one yesterday, but the shop only had a 57 in and I need a 51 or 54. Who knows, maybe I will not like carbon after I give it a twirl, but I have to at least try it out.

    My problem with Bianchi is that absolutely nobody around here carries the stuff. Their website has several bike shops around here as dealers, but I have visited three and they no longer carry Bianchi because of poor customer service. In visiting the third shop, I got to see several Orbeas and several Litespeeds. I ended up liking both bikes, but the Litespeeds are way out of my price range. Heck, the Opal barely falls within my price range.

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