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  1. #26
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    Well, I tried that. I asked Jack, one of the sales reps there, if he would give me his recommendation on size based on all my measurement data, and he declined to do so. I was disappointed because I've read all the reviews of Lynskey bikes on another forum (the one linked to the Lynskey web site) and several people commented on how helpful the folks at Lynskey were in putting them on the right size frame. I am really confused why he wouldn't help me out. He did tell me that his wife rides a S and if I can come to Chattanooga he'll let me ride hers. Basically I feel like he told me to figure out on my own what size I need then they'll be glad to sell me one, which is so different from what I expected after reading the other reviews.

  2. #27
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    That's weird. Mike was very helpful on everything, but I guess I pretty well knew what I needed in a size from comparing geometry tables of the Lyskeys to three or four bikes I'd test ridden. He was tracking down measurements that aren't listed on their website just so I could be sure I was getting what I expected.

    What I did was test ride as many bikes as I could and decided that carbon was cool, but not timeless. A bike at that price range should be either a tool for money-making, or something that will last physically and stylistically for more than a few years. The measurements of the test ridden bikes were all lined up next to the cooper and sportive measurements. If I recall correctly, nothing was more than 1/2 centimeter or 1/2 degree from the corresponding size in the Cannondale, Specialized and Giant bikes. That 1/2 centimeter can easily be made up with a longer stem or pushing the seat back a hair.

    Just be willing to spend some time drawing up tables from the bikes you know fit, or would fit you well with a stem adjustment.

    Good luck.

  3. #28
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    Go with Lynskey R230

    I'm a proud owner of a Lynskey level 3 road bike. The frame itself is very similar to the R230. The curve seat stay tube is awesome! You will Not lose any speed vs the Cooper. The R230 is an outstanding frame! Keep your legs Fresh day after days.
    My level 3 is build up with Shimano 7800 dura ace with compact crandset, Mavic K10 wheelset. It just flys up the hills and corners like on rails during decent! On the flat is fast, fast, fast!
    Go with Lynskey (company web) and check out the daily special-build up bikes at deep discounts! Only bike your friend will ever have to buy, the weldings is a work of Art. Litspeed? Way too many complaints...

  4. #29
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    I might try to engage with Don Erwin or someone else. Jack wasn't rude or anything, just not helpful. It seems if he really wanted to sell me a bike, he'd be eager to help me choose the size, and I had all the measurements ready to send to him. He just said he would not be able to recommend a size and referred me to the Competitive Cyclist fit calculator. I also asked some questions about the helix frame and he didn't even answer them at all.

  5. #30
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    Hmm.... Sounds like Jack was watching the phones while someone was at lunch. Maybe he just didn't know and didn't want to give you bad info and didn't want to admit he didn't know either. I would call back and talk to someone else and at the end, politely mention your convo with Jack.

  6. #31
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    I know Jack and I wouldn't fit someone over the phone either. While he could get you on a bike without actually fitting you to the actual bike it could still not be right. I think you would have much less respect for Jack and Lynskey if they put you on the wrong size bike. I've personally purchased 5 bikes from Jack and he was always more then helpful but I know my fit numbers so it was never a question of what size.
    For my next trick I will now set myself on fire!

  7. #32
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    I own a Lynskey Sportive and am very happy with the ride and handling. I am not a racer, more of a longer ride guy, centuries and metrics mostly. I'm six feet and ride a large, and my LBS said it is almost a perfect fit. I have been professionally measured and the shop gave me a hard copy of the dimensions, so I could just match them up with Lynskey's.
    Last edited by GA1911; 01-12-2012 at 06:19 AM.

  8. #33
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    Well, we're not talking about a custom fit job here and I wasn't asking for recommendations on stem length or anything like that, just "if I send you my measurements - height, inseam, thigh, torso, thigh, arm, can you tell me whether a S or M frame is the right frame size for me?" and his answer was "No, I would not be able to do that." Frankly I was surprised by that response. That shouldn't be too hard for the guys who are building the bikes. Obviously they've thought about that since they have a size chart on their website (based only on height). But please understand, I'm not trying to trash Jack. Since I didn't get the kind of information I needed from him, I asked for feedback from people who already own Lynskeys about how they fit. That's what I wanted this conversation to be about, not the quality of their customer service. I'll just have to work with that. One person already said they are 5'10" and ride a size M, even though that size chart says M is for people 5'6'' to 5'8." I'm 5'7''' and my current bike, which I was fitted for when I bought it, seems a little long for me even after switching to a shorter stem so I don't want to end up with another too-long bike again. Ultimately I guess I have to get on one and see which size works for me, maybe make that trip to Chattanooga.

  9. #34
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    GA 1911, That sounds like what I should do. Can you tell me what type of fitting process/method was used for you? One shop not too far away ffrom me has a pretty sophisticated method which takes 2-3 hrs to do. They charge $275 for it but are having a sale now for $140. Another shop which advertises that it will not allow anyone to leave their shop without a perfect fitting bike, charges $100/hr, no matter how long it takes, but I think they use tape measures and rely on years of experience rather than fancy computer programs.

  10. #35
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    The fitting involved a device I stood in that was hooked to a PC. I stood in the machine and the tech moved sensors to differnt points on my body neasuring my torso, arms, legs, overall height, etc. I didn't pay for the fitting, it was part of a bike fitting during the purchase of a new bike, but I think this shop charges $100 for the service. They printed everything out in a chart and gave it to me, so I refer to it when looking at frames.

  11. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by jspurlin View Post
    GA 1911, That sounds like what I should do. Can you tell me what type of fitting process/method was used for you? One shop not too far away ffrom me has a pretty sophisticated method which takes 2-3 hrs to do. They charge $275 for it but are having a sale now for $140. Another shop which advertises that it will not allow anyone to leave their shop without a perfect fitting bike, charges $100/hr, no matter how long it takes, but I think they use tape measures and rely on years of experience rather than fancy computer programs.
    both ways work, whether it's retul or some other computer system, or just tape measures and wisdom--good fitters tend to have very loyal customer bases. but to get the definitive answer on what size bike to get, it would be a good idea to get fitted before dropping money on a frame. research past customers' feedback to get a feel for which fitter you want to use.

  12. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by jspurlin View Post
    GA 1911, That sounds like what I should do. Can you tell me what type of fitting process/method was used for you? One shop not too far away ffrom me has a pretty sophisticated method which takes 2-3 hrs to do. They charge $275 for it but are having a sale now for $140. Another shop which advertises that it will not allow anyone to leave their shop without a perfect fitting bike, charges $100/hr, no matter how long it takes, but I think they use tape measures and rely on years of experience rather than fancy computer programs.

    Getting a fitting done is the best way to go. My Lynskey R320 is a M/L and Im' 6' tall. I have a long inseam but a short torso so even though the Lynskey chart say I should be on a large I still only run a 100mm stem on a M/L. BTW I have been sized using a Fit Kit, Wobble not and a Retul fittings.
    Last edited by Juanmoretime; 01-12-2012 at 04:57 PM.
    For my next trick I will now set myself on fire!

  13. #38
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    If Lynskey do not provide you a good service, you may consider other brands, like moots, seven, KE... From some rumors in taiwan forum, there is an US brand Titanium bike company, import the product from China directly, hand brush or put laser writing on frame in US, and say, made in US.
    As we are paying a premium price for Ti frame, we shall expect high quality tubing, welding... in US, but not China.

  14. #39
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    Please do tell, Chinese Ti frame?

    What is the name of that company where the Titanium frame is made in China???

  15. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by wai11111 View Post
    What is the name of that company where the Titanium frame is made in China???
    Habenero
    For my next trick I will now set myself on fire!

  16. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Juanmoretime View Post
    Habenero
    does Hab claim their frames are made in the US? I didn't think they did but if so, I don't see how they could get away with that, as I've read that the rules in the US are much stricter than the EU.

    When the poster made that claim, I was thinking of a more nefarious scenario where a well known US company was outright lying to the consumer.
    Ordered and Fitted for my Custom DEAN Titanium frame on Sept 17th, 2008. Finally got it in Oct, 2010!!!

  17. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ride-Fly View Post
    does Hab claim their frames are made in the US? I didn't think they did but if so, I don't see how they could get away with that, as I've read that the rules in the US are much stricter than the EU.

    When the poster made that claim, I was thinking of a more nefarious scenario where a well known US company was outright lying to the consumer.
    From habaneros tech page:
    Why Habanero?

    To be honest, there are not many bad titanium frames out there. I can't think of a single titanium frame from a major manufacturer that isn't a nice frame. So why should you buy a Habanero? There are several compelling reasons.
    Build quality. The frames are fabricated by an honest-to-goodness aerospace builder in China, not some cookie-cutter bike frame factory. The welders are aerospace certified and have 10-15 years of experience (compare that with most builders). Their attention to detail and experience shines through in the fantastic single pass welds, and in the construction and alignment of all of the frame's components.* They're also a great group of people that I am honored to work with.* Plus, having lived in and traveled to China over the last 10+ years, I've seen the difference that the free market economy is making in the lives of the Chinese people, and I'm proud Habanero is a (small) part of that.

  18. #43
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    if you want a Litespeed, buy a Lynskey...
    if you want a Merlin, buy a Seven...

    truth of the matter is that as a guy running a business, investors and stakeholders pushed for profit/growth and the only way to satisfy is to expand the product line. Not everyone can afford a titanium bike nor is a titanium frame the most chosen option for racing, If they wanted to sell more bikes, adding options with different materials was the the only decision they could make,

    I don't blame the folks at Litespeed or Merlin for making the business decisions they did. I can say that I'm glad to see the folks both at Lynskey and Seven though for focusing in on their love and holding true to their passion of building the best titanium bikes they can build.

    I'm currently selling off some vintage stereo equipment, old bike projects and parts, etc, and putting a little money away each month as I'm aiming for an R230 myself...a nice Ti frame will be a once in a lifetime purchase for me..I'm 42 and expect to ride this bike until a catastrophic life event occurs.

    I'm choosing the R230 over the others as it has everything you'd want for long distance comfort...the geometry of the Cooper is aggressive and the Sportive lacks the replaceable deraileur hanger...

    hope this helps!
    Joe

  19. #44
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    Than again, most carbon frame are made in China and riders are paying $5K or so for it... Company should just be honest and stamped it on the frame. i know it may lower the cost with the China info, than again, we all know only handful of frame (Treck top end frames) are made in U.S.A.

  20. #45
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    Go for the Lynskey, you won"t regret it.
    R210 4 years.

  21. #46
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    I went with the R340 and couldn't be happier. It was twice the wait time that they said (4 months instead of 2 this was frustrating) but I believe was worth it. I was fitted at the Lynskey dealer 100 miles from my house and they were very helpful. I am 5'6" 135 lbs with a 30" inseam and went with a small which has a 53 cm top tube. I use an 80 mm +/- 6 deg stem and set back post. Fits great and makes me want to ride the bike, I love it!

  22. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by jspurlin View Post
    Thanks!. That's good to know but adds to my confusion because the size charts say the M is for riders 5'6'' to 5'8".
    Yea ignore that sizing chart, go by the actual frame geo. It seems to recommend frames on the larger side of the spectrum. I'm long torso'd and a medium with a 105mm-110mm stem works perfectly for my dimensions.
    It never gets easier. You just go faster. Greg LeMond

  23. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by PlatyPius View Post
    Litespeed sucks. They took an iconic titanium builder and turned it into a purchaser of Chinese carbon generic frames. They drove Merlin into the ground and killed it. Litespeed doesn't deserve to exist.
    Litespeed does not own Merlin the parent company of both does.
    2015 Specialized Tarmac, Ultegra 6800, HED C2 rims
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  24. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by darwinosx View Post
    Litespeed does not own Merlin the parent company of both does.
    That's a silly distinction. American Bicycle Group IS Litespeed. Merlin, Tomac, QR were all added later. Of course, Merlin isn't owned by Litespeed or ABG anymore; neither is Tomac.
    Other countries need to stop hatin' or we'll unfriend them. - Christine

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  25. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by PlatyPius View Post
    That's a silly distinction. American Bicycle Group IS Litespeed. Merlin, Tomac, QR were all added later. Of course, Merlin isn't owned by Litespeed or ABG anymore; neither is Tomac.
    No you are silly. A silly little man. :-)
    ABG was the parent company of both Litespeed and Merlin among other brands.

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