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  1. #1
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    6'4" 240 lbs newbie looking for road bike

    Sorry to ask this because I'm sure it's been asked to death. I'm looking for some direction as to mid range road bike suitable for a beginner. Trek, Lemond, Litespeed? I'm looking to keep it under $2,500.00.
    I'm longer in the torso than the legs.
    Thanks

    DCR

  2. #2
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    use the search function on the board, I'm sure you will find the answer. Other than that, go to several local bike shops and test ride what they have. For $2500, you will be able to get a very nice bike.

  3. #3
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    We're built the same

    Quote Originally Posted by 5th wheel
    Sorry to ask this because I'm sure it's been asked to death. I'm looking for some direction as to mid range road bike suitable for a beginner. Trek, Lemond, Litespeed? I'm looking to keep it under $2,500.00.
    I'm longer in the torso than the legs.
    Thanks

    DCR
    I'm 6'4, 230lbs (16% BF) and have a 34" inseam (all torso). I love my LOOK 461 (59cm). Built up with Ultegra / DA mix, you should be able to come close to that budget $. LOOK has unique enough seat angles and geometry to make it a "love / hate" fit. I rode a Specialized Allez for 3 years and it never fit well. Always had back pain.

    Suggest you get a fitting at an LBS you know and trust. Mine gave me the fitting cost toward the frame or bike, so it essentially cost me nothing in the end.

    Carbon Fiber is NOT out of the question for clydesdales. Au contraire, it's tough stuff! Don't think that steel is your only choice.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by 5th wheel
    Sorry to ask this because I'm sure it's been asked to death. I'm looking for some direction as to mid range road bike suitable for a beginner. Trek, Lemond, Litespeed? I'm looking to keep it under $2,500.00.
    I'm longer in the torso than the legs.
    Thanks

    DCR
    I am 6'2" and was 260pds (now 240 pds). I bought a Trek 5200 and love it. I have put about 1000 miles on it and it rides as nice as the day I bought it. My bike is a 60 cm frame. You will probably need a 62cm Frame.

    I had to put a 17 degree rise stem on the bike so it would fit me. My torso is also longer then my legs.

  5. #5
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    2005 Specialized Roubaix Comp comes in a 61 cm frame size I believe. Sloping top tube for clearance, taller head tube for comfort. I test rode one last week, very nice.

  6. #6
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    04 Roubaix Elite 27

    I checked the Specialized web site and the Elite comes in a 62.

  7. #7
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    The 04 Elite comes in a 62cm frame but is Al alloy while the 05 Elite is made in a 61cm size and is carbon. I rode the carbon bike in a 58. I'd suggest you ride both to see if the size and material difference matters to you. Then compare the better of the two to other bikes in your size. Good luck and have fun.

  8. #8
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    just me . . .

    I'm 6' 3.25", 35.5" cycling inseam, and 180 lbs. I've got a longer torso than legs. I've found a good fit on a 62 cm trek 5500 with a 130 mm stem (TT is 59.2 cm). For me, I think the 59 cm TT is about as short as I could tollerate.

    Don't get too hung up on the seat tube size. Focus on actual top tube (TT) length, then adjust the stem from there. There's nothing wrong with a stem that anywhere from 90 to 130 mm.

    You'll find a nice rig for <= $2.5k. Have fun!

  9. #9
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    I really like the Lemond Zurich

    Quote Originally Posted by Drone 5200
    I'm 6' 3.25", 35.5" cycling inseam, and 180 lbs. I've got a longer torso than legs. I've found a good fit on a 62 cm trek 5500 with a 130 mm stem (TT is 59.2 cm). For me, I think the 59 cm TT is about as short as I could tollerate.

    Don't get too hung up on the seat tube size. Focus on actual top tube (TT) length, then adjust the stem from there. There's nothing wrong with a stem that anywhere from 90 to 130 mm.

    You'll find a nice rig for <= $2.5k. Have fun!
    I'm going to get on a Zurich today. They also sell Klein's, and Trek's. I've looked at the Litespeed Solono on the internet, it's the top of the price curve for me.
    Thanks for the reply's.
    David

  10. #10
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    Cannondale R1000

    Went to test the Zurich and the bike shop put me on Cannondale R1000. I liked it, but reviews say the brakes suck. I've been working in the car business for the past 12 years and I wonder if bike shops are like car dealerships..put'em in what we've got not what they say they want. LBS said the the steel Zurich would flex too much.
    What say you???

  11. #11
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    Depends on the shop

    Quote Originally Posted by 5th wheel
    Went to test the Zurich and the bike shop put me on Cannondale R1000. I liked it, but reviews say the brakes suck. I've been working in the car business for the past 12 years and I wonder if bike shops are like car dealerships..put'em in what we've got not what they say they want. LBS said the the steel Zurich would flex too much.
    What say you???
    You're right. No one buys the 6 cylinder, the 4 is much more economical...Really, the leather seats hold their value much better....It's the exact same as the Lexus, only without the decals...The Zurich flexes too much.

    I've seen both types of shops. Ones which are exactly like the sleazy car dealers who don't listen to the customer. I have a close cycling connection with a shop owner like that. I never buy from him as he runs his business this way. Doesn't mean I don't like him, just that I don't care for his business tactics. My regular shop (whom I also like the owners) has asked me to look elsewhere for a bike. They've told me they can't get the size or features I wnat in a resonable time (can't meet my expectations) and have sent me elsewhere.

    Buy what YOU like, not wnat that shop is pushing. And I'll stand by my previous post (and those who chimed in with trek 5X00). Go CF. You'll love it assuming the geometry is right (Check out LOOK as they're long in the TT WRT frame size). I also agree with the TT length being most important / most often ignored dimension.

    Dave

  12. #12
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    Exclamation

    Bike shops sell bikes. They have their interests. You want to buy a bike. Don't assume that you have the same interest as the bike shop. They might have a half dozen cannondale r1000s. They would rather sell you one. That doesn't make it your interest.

    I agree with almost everyone here who suggests Trek 5200, Specialized Roubaix Comp, and I think that Lemond Zurich ought to be a wonderful ride for you too...

    I have three suggestions..

    1) Get a bike that fits, and get it adjusted so that you ride in comfort. No bike is worth bad knees, twisted ankles, sore back, shoulders, arms, neck, etc... Get a bike that fits.

    2) Get what you want, not what the bike shop tells you to get. You have to spend the money and you have to live with it (or) find a way to sell it to get the bike that you really want. Get what you want to begin with. There might be a bike shop that has your best interests, and sizes you, and gives you extra attention. The extra money they charge will be worth it if you get the bike that you want. Get the bike you want.

    3) If your total budget is $2500 - try to find a bike for $2k or so. You will need the rest (conservatively) for helmet, gloves, bottles, lights, underseat bags, bicycle shorts, shoes, pedals, jerseys, pumps, spare tubes, and maybe a slush fund for stuff that you will find out you need in a month of riding. Maybe some books on bicycling, maybe some entry fees to local rides. Be prepared to get some extra stuff.

    Have fun and good luck.
    -J.

  13. #13
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    I've found in my recent search for a road bike that I can't get a straight answer from anyone. I am 2" taller and 40# heavier and I feel your pain.

    I've had one shop tell me "steel is a bad idea for you" and yet another "stay away from aluminum, you need need steel". One shop says "you'll need to upgrade to Open Pros' or Velocity Deep V's" and a different guy from the same shop tells me "the wheels on that bike will be just fine for you" when speaking of the same bike. Now here, in this thread, "carbon fiber is fine for clydes" and I've heard, from this very forum, "stay away from CF".

    I'm not saying anyone is giving my bad information. What I am saying is, when it comes to tall and/or heavy riders, the information you get will be inconsistent at best. It is frustrating as hell. So frustrating, in fact, that I've all but abandonded the idea of getting a roadie for now.

  14. #14
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    1/2 dozen shops

    I think I've finally found the shop that will get me on the right bike. Actually the process has been fun. I'm surprised that I must have seemed so stupid to most retailers. There are a lot of fine bikes in my price range and that only makes it more difficult to make a decision. The end result is I'll be another guy with my own opinions. So, I'd offer the idea that you continue to shop retailers until you find one that you feel comfortable with.
    I understand how you feel.
    David


    Quote Originally Posted by BigDave1
    I've found in my recent search for a road bike that I can't get a straight answer from anyone. I am 2" taller and 40# heavier and I feel your pain.

    I've had one shop tell me "steel is a bad idea for you" and yet another "stay away from aluminum, you need need steel". One shop says "you'll need to upgrade to Open Pros' or Velocity Deep V's" and a different guy from the same shop tells me "the wheels on that bike will be just fine for you" when speaking of the same bike. Now here, in this thread, "carbon fiber is fine for clydes" and I've heard, from this very forum, "stay away from CF".

    I'm not saying anyone is giving my bad information. What I am saying is, when it comes to tall and/or heavy riders, the information you get will be inconsistent at best. It is frustrating as hell. So frustrating, in fact, that I've all but abandonded the idea of getting a roadie for now.

  15. #15
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    Question

    Quote Originally Posted by 5th wheel
    the right bike.
    Ok David, Enough with the suspense. What did you get?

  16. #16
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    I haven't bought yet

    After a very through coversation the bike shop I'll buy from told me to wait. Because they're between model years they don't have anything in my size. They asked me what type of riding I think is fun, my intended use. Then they suggested a Klein, but they said they'd offer the opportunity to ride a number of bikes that would fit my purpose. They didn't say, the ABC bah,bah, bah is the best bike for you because we have one. They took some time asked a lot of questions and said they didn't have what would best suit my needs. That really appealed to me.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigDave1
    I've found in my recent search for a road bike that I can't get a straight answer from anyone. I am 2" taller and 40# heavier and I feel your pain.

    I've had one shop tell me "steel is a bad idea for you" and yet another "stay away from aluminum, you need need steel". One shop says "you'll need to upgrade to Open Pros' or Velocity Deep V's" and a different guy from the same shop tells me "the wheels on that bike will be just fine for you" when speaking of the same bike. Now here, in this thread, "carbon fiber is fine for clydes" and I've heard, from this very forum, "stay away from CF".

    I'm not saying anyone is giving my bad information. What I am saying is, when it comes to tall and/or heavy riders, the information you get will be inconsistent at best. It is frustrating as hell. So frustrating, in fact, that I've all but abandonded the idea of getting a roadie for now.

    I really feel your pain, being about the same size. I built my own bike out of frustration. That was a fun process. I spent the money where I wanted to. I bought some stuff just because I wanted it. I did get some heavy, heavy duty wheels from a great builder though (just happen to have Volocity deep V rims). Steel, Titanium, Aluminum, or Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer should all be fine for you. This stuff will hold up to much more than some people think. Just go for it, and you won't be sorry. I am getting some exercise, enjoying my ride, and loosing weight. I go farther all of the time. Some of the parts on an off-the-floor bike might not hold up, but it won't break all at once, and you can upgrade as you go, and as you need to.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigDave1
    I've found in my recent search for a road bike that I can't get a straight answer from anyone. I am 2" taller and 40# heavier and I feel your pain.

    I've had one shop tell me "steel is a bad idea for you" and yet another "stay away from aluminum, you need need steel". One shop says "you'll need to upgrade to Open Pros' or Velocity Deep V's" and a different guy from the same shop tells me "the wheels on that bike will be just fine for you" when speaking of the same bike. Now here, in this thread, "carbon fiber is fine for clydes" and I've heard, from this very forum, "stay away from CF".

    I'm not saying anyone is giving my bad information. What I am saying is, when it comes to tall and/or heavy riders, the information you get will be inconsistent at best. It is frustrating as hell. So frustrating, in fact, that I've all but abandonded the idea of getting a roadie for now.
    Big Dave don't get so discouraged. i had similar experiences although i am not as big as you. but big nonetheless 6'3 225. you will find people who contradict each other. especially in regards to frame material. i live in seattlewhich is home to a lot of hardcore old-school steel guys. a good friend who is a bike genius strongly recommended steel as well. in the end i still couldn't decide. i was down to two bikes one steel one alum/carbon. i finally said "f*ck it, i am going to ride this back to back on a climb and rough road and then go with what feels best" i went alum/carb because i am in the camp that frame material doesn't matter as long as it is built well.

    i will say i got virtually no help from the shop i bought from but they had the bike i wanted and i am reasonably well connected to bike people so i am not worried about support. plus my wife just bought her bike from a great shop.

    i will tell you to do what i did. ride everything you can and not worry about it. all frames have pros and cons. pick what feels best. i did and i couldn't happier.

    my .02

  19. #19
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    Crank -

    Thanks for the encouragement. And, I think you are right. It is just tough to feel good about a decision when the information is all over the board.

    Is "feel good" really what it comes down to with a roadie? I'm a competitive shooter, and what feels good isn't typically what works best (at least at first). I'm not trying to compare high quality road bikes and precision firearms, but that is where I am.

  20. #20
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    I spent several weeks going thru the arduous process of bike selection. I too had set my limit on around $2500. I'm 6'5" and 200 lb.

    There are several good web sites which can put you in the "ball park" for frame size.

    http://www.bikefitting.com/English/Frame.aspx

    http://www.parktool.com/repair_help/roadposition.shtml

    My recommended frame size is around 65-66 cm based on my floor to crotch measurement. Unfortunately there was no way I going to get a custom built for under $3000

    Fuji makes the biggest stock road frame I could fine at 64 cm (center-top). I bought a Fuji Professional for $1600 (after double points coupon rebate) at Performance with full DA 7800 drive train. I was hoping that I could get some years and miles out of that bike, see how I like road biking then probably get a custom built (probably Titanium) from someplace like Independent Fabrication or perhaps Leonard Zinn.

    The mystery for a new a roadie is what feels good on a 10 minute test ride may not feel so good after a 2-3 hour ride trying to keep up with your buddies.

    As long as the bike has a decent warranty, you will be safe no matter what material you choose. Good Luck.
    If a man is standing in the woods and he says something, is he still wrong if a woman is not around?

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigDave1
    Crank -

    Thanks for the encouragement. And, I think you are right. It is just tough to feel good about a decision when the information is all over the board.

    Is "feel good" really what it comes down to with a roadie? I'm a competitive shooter, and what feels good isn't typically what works best (at least at first). I'm not trying to compare high quality road bikes and precision firearms, but that is where I am.

    i understand and i had experiences in other hobbies influencing my decision as well. but you are the only one going to be on the bike. so what you like is really what matters. i went against the advice of a trusted friend and some other bike shops. but in the end it is what your ass, arms, back, and legs like that really matters. good luck.

    i am sure you own a gun that other people scoff at as you scoff at others. its the same thing here you just don't have as much knowledge in this hobby.

  22. #22
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    I'm an action pistol shooter B class USPSA

    Big Dave 1,
    I shoot too, but in shooting we generally agree on tools we use. I guess the lesson is the differences in bikes is so subtle that opinions vary and your actual mileage may differ.
    David

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    small world

    5th - I too am B Class (Limited) in USPSA.

    If only SV made road bikes, and Viht made wheels life would be SIMPLE!!!

    Well, I guess I'll just get a close to fit as I can (don't want to go custom at this point) and ride like hell. If I want to be really cumfy, I'll stay on the couch. Eh?

  24. #24
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    I'm a lucky bastard

    I live in NC and shoot once a week with Chris Tilley. Currently I'm having Kodiak Precision build me a limited SV gun. Life is good. I agree withe the SV Vito analogy.
    DVC.
    Best of Health.
    David


    Quote Originally Posted by BigDave1
    5th - I too am B Class (Limited) in USPSA.

    If only SV made road bikes, and Viht made wheels life would be SIMPLE!!!

    Well, I guess I'll just get a close to fit as I can (don't want to go custom at this point) and ride like hell. If I want to be really cumfy, I'll stay on the couch. Eh?

  25. #25
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    So the problem expands all ranges, hu?

    I'm so glad to know you taller people are having much of the same issue I did when I bought my bike (only from a much higher vantage LOL). I'm 4'11, 105 & had an incredibly difficult time finding a bike that fit (much less finding a LBS that had anything in stock I could test ride). I don't feel so alone anymore...
    Lisa
    San Antonio, TX

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