Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    37

    Advice Lemond Poprad to Norco Threshold

    Right now I have a 2006 Lemond Poprad with the only changes being a Surly Crosscheck fork and V-Brakes. Here's the Bluebook specs on it: https://www.bicyclebluebook.com/sear....aspx?id=11635

    I really like the frame and ride it for commuting and any road rides where I'll likely get on some gravel or even light trails (I have an actual road bike for group rides).

    I would like to race cross this year and have been thinking about something lighter and obviously, the 2006 is 11 years old, and I haven't kept up enough with developments in componentry to know if the following bike would offer more stiffness/power, etc. So I've been looking at the Norco Threshold A Tiagra: Bikes - Norco Bicycles

    My budget will only allow for a maximum of $1800 CANADIAN. The Threshold comes in at $1600, but I can get it from my shop lightly used for about $1300.

    So would I be better off going with the Threshold or looking at swapping out maybe wheelset and/or parts on my Lemond both to lower the weight and improve performance? Any thoughts would be greatly appreciated

  2. #2
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Posts
    83
    I had an '05 Poprad, and I loved it. It eventually cracked on the driveside chain stay, and Trek gave me a Crockett as a replacement. The Crockett wasn't as nice to ride, nor was the awkward handling Jake the Snake that I also tried to replace it with.

    I say keep the Poprad and upgrade it. It's a neat frame, and I still look on eBay for a good used one. Stiffness is one of those things that nobody can agree upon... does it matter? Can you notice? Do you even want a really stiff frame? Is it actually faster or better? I almost went down that road with replacing my slightly flexy Lynskey Cooper road frame with a stiffer Emonda ALR 6 Pro, but in the end, it wasn't much of a difference and didn't ride as well. I gave the Lynskey a new drivetain and fork instead. No regrets there.

    Discs may be a nice upgrade, and you can always do a mullet (disc fork w/mechanical front disc, rear rim brakes), or possibly find a disc adapter for the rear. Then again, rim brakes can be good enough, depending on use.

    I'd get a nice wheelset (tubeless as well) (~$500), upgrade to Ultegra 6800/8000 (~$600), and maybe get a new fancy carbon fork (~$350) for the Poprad. Things like new bar tape and cables will make it feel like a new bike. The fork alone will likely drop over a pound off of the bike, and those wheels are tanks. Strong, but heavy. I'd imagine you'll be able to do all of that for well under budget and drop a couple of lbs in the process.

    Edit - the build on that Norco isn't great either... you can make the Poprad a lot nicer.
    Last edited by Pisgah2000; 08-30-2017 at 06:52 AM.

  3. #3
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    37
    Quote Originally Posted by Pisgah2000 View Post
    I had an '05 Poprad, and I loved it. It eventually cracked on the driveside chain stay, and Trek gave me a Crockett as a replacement. The Crockett wasn't as nice to ride, nor was the awkward handling Jake the Snake that I also tried to replace it with.

    I say keep the Poprad and upgrade it. It's a neat frame, and I still look on eBay for a good used one. Stiffness is one of those things that nobody can agree upon... does it matter? Can you notice? Do you even want a really stiff frame? Is it actually faster or better? I almost went down that road with replacing my slightly flexy Lynskey Cooper road frame with a stiffer Emonda ALR 6 Pro, but in the end, it wasn't much of a difference and didn't ride as well. I gave the Lynskey a new drivetain and fork instead. No regrets there.

    Discs may be a nice upgrade, and you can always do a mullet (disc fork w/mechanical front disc, rear rim brakes), or possibly find a disc adapter for the rear. Then again, rim brakes can be good enough, depending on use.

    I'd get a nice wheelset (tubeless as well) (~$500), upgrade to Ultegra 6800/8000 (~$600), and maybe get a new fancy carbon fork (~$350) for the Poprad. Things like new bar tape and cables will make it feel like a new bike. The fork alone will likely drop over a pound off of the bike, and those wheels are tanks. Strong, but heavy. I'd imagine you'll be able to do all of that for well under budget and drop a couple of lbs in the process.

    Edit - the build on that Norco isn't great either... you can make the Poprad a lot nicer.
    Thanks, very much. This is really helpful. I have really loved the frame and the bike. I just took it on singletrack this morning and even with the tires at 65, it handled so well. I'm really reluctant to get rid of her and I love steel. I'm thinking that until I'm out of grad school and can afford full carbon with nice wheels and a good drive train, it's not really worth it to go with something newer but of little better quality. Thanks for the suggestions on upgrading; this was the part I wasn't sure about.

  4. #4
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Posts
    83
    No problem. I'd say the Norco is probably a downgrade, even compared to the stock Poprad. Plus, if you really like it, that's what matters.

    Upgrading things is more fun than buying a whole new bike anyway. To keep the budget lower without much sacrifice, I'd probably get 105 5800 11-speed. It's a fair bit less expensive than Ultegra 6800 without much of a performance/weight difference. It's under $400 for the entire groupset on Ribble... even without one of their common coupons, that's a steal.

  5. #5
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    37
    That makes a lot of sense. For the price of the Threshold (on sale) I can get a carbon fork, 105 and a sweet wheelset (it'd be so nice not to have to worry about pinch flats given how often I will road ride and then get off for a rip around some singletrack.

    Really appreciate your help here!

  6. #6
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    2,502
    I live very close to one of the top Norco dealers in the world - I own a Norco Search and absolutely love it for all-road.

    In my humble opinion, generally speaking, Norco as a brand one of the best values in getting all around quality (components, frame build, engineering/design, etc...) for your money. They don't get a lot of publicity, but they make solid, well designed stuff, and you generally get good components at the various price points.

    That said, I'm not a cross guy, and I don't know much about the Threshold, except that a lot of people race them (and love them) around here.

    Edit to add: The new 2018 Threshold was just recently released, and Shimano has recently released new Ultegra components, which means shops should be motivated to sell (see if you can leverage a good deal). My local Norco dealer is having a huge Labor Day sale, and all of the non-2018 bikes will be discounted between 30% and 40%.

  7. #7
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    37
    Thanks, for this, Migen21. I'll definitely keep it in mind. I think if I could afford the higher end Thresholds, I'd go for it (there are three in carbon and three in aluminum). Unfortunately, until I finally finish this grad degree, I'm on the low end of the scale!

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 03-25-2015, 02:10 PM
  2. 2015 Norco Threshold
    By shapelike in forum Cyclocross
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 09-21-2014, 12:56 PM
  3. Need some advice on the Norco crd road bike.
    By kable in forum General Cycling Discussion
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 02-12-2010, 12:22 PM
  4. poprad vs poprad disc
    By kirbach75 in forum Commuting, Touring and Ride Reports
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 10-15-2007, 06:31 PM
  5. Replies: 9
    Last Post: 01-10-2006, 11:05 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •