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  1. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fredrico View Post
    Well, I'm just going by the evidence in the picture. What's your average cadence and do you mash big gears? That'll do it on a cheap aluminum chain ring, if we can believe the picture. Those teeth look more worn than after the first couple of thousand miles.

    I knew a guy who completely flattened all his big ring teeth. He did it in one season. He was complaining how the chain was skipping. The teeth on the inner cog looked spanking brand new, not even any chain lube residue.

    After that derailleur gets adjusted, you'll be ok for awhile on that ring, but I'd get my "spin" down a little better. Don't always try the hardest gears. Instead increase leg speeds. The drive train will last a lot longer.
    Definitely appreciate the input. Unfortunately, I don't have a computer or sensors yet, but hopefully making that purchase soon!

    That ring is actually steel, not aluminum. I will certainly work on picking up spin speed rather than putting down power.

  2. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dbcycle4 View Post
    Definitely appreciate the input. Unfortunately, I don't have a computer or sensors yet, but hopefully making that purchase soon!

    That ring is actually steel, not aluminum. I will certainly work on picking up spin speed rather than putting down power.

    No, those rings are anodized 7075 T6 Aluminum.

    https://praxiscycles.com/product/road-clover-rings/


    Being anodized, the coating wears off under friction exposing bare alloy underneath. Surprising it happened in only 100 miles.
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  3. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marc View Post
    No, those rings are anodized 7075 T6 Aluminum.

    https://praxiscycles.com/product/road-clover-rings/


    Being anodized, the coating wears off under friction exposing bare alloy underneath. Surprising it happened in only 100 miles.
    Ah, you are correct! Not sure why I thought they are steel.

  4. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dbcycle4 View Post
    I'm sure I mash fairly hard due to inexperience and that I'm pretty big (not fat). Seems like it would be hard to wear down teeth in a week regardless of mashing...
    Teeth aren't worn, that's done by design. Look at some of the teeth on this pic.
    https://goo.gl/images/dVfPrJ
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  5. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dbcycle4 View Post
    Unfortunately, I don't have a computer or sensors yet, but hopefully making that purchase soon!
    .
    use a wrist watch to count your feet cycles for 10 seconds and then multiply by 6. Same for heart rate. Save the money for event entries if you want to improve faster. Use a magnet on your bike parts, you'll soon learn which are steel.

  6. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by redondoaveb View Post
    Teeth aren't worn, that's done by design. Look at some of the teeth on this pic.
    https://goo.gl/images/dVfPrJ
    Exactly! Some teeth are shorter by design to make upshifting smoother.

    Dbcycle4, that ring has to be aluminum. Steel would not have bent like that. And even so, it would take tremendous force to do what happened. I really doubt you did that pedaling unless you weigh over 250lbs. Have you ever felt anything jam while shifting at all while you have owned the bike? If not, I would say something hit the crank.

    Regardless, if you're not having any trouble shifting into the large ring, I would forget about it. Ride on!
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

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  7. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    Exactly! Some teeth are shorter by design to make upshifting smoother.

    Dbcycle4, that ring has to be aluminum. Steel would not have bent like that. And even so, it would take tremendous force to do what happened. I really doubt you did that pedaling unless you weigh over 250lbs. Have you ever felt anything jam while shifting at all while you have owned the bike? If not, I would say something hit the crank.

    Regardless, if you're not having any trouble shifting into the large ring, I would forget about it. Ride on!
    Can't remember anything jam. I'm around 200, and I really doubt I did it pedaling as well.

    Feels the same as before shifting rings, but based on comments, think I need to get the FD checked for proper height.

  8. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dbcycle4 View Post
    ... think I need to get the FD checked for proper height.
    why not search the web and figure it out? just because a guy works at a bike shop doesn't mean he gives a **** about you or your bike.

    sheldon brown is your friend. also check the park tools site, this forum (and bikeforums.net), and youtube.

    i usually place the fd as close to the top of the big ring as possible (roughly 2mm from hitting the teeth) and ensure the crank arm is equal distance to the fd during its rotation.
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  9. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by redondoaveb View Post
    Teeth aren't worn, that's done by design. Look at some of the teeth on this pic.
    https://goo.gl/images/dVfPrJ
    Very interesting. These rings are "pre-worn" for your cycling comfort! Shimano does this, too.

    The "ramps" on the teeth look exactly like wear marks. Oh well, so much for modern technology.

    I've got about 50,000 miles each on two bike since I last changed the chain rings. They don't look nearly as "worn" as the one OP posted. The teeth engaged on the down strokes are slightly more worn than the other teeth. After 50,000 miles, it pretty much comes down to pedaling style. If I'd mashed those miles, the rings would have been history a long time ago.

    Yes, definitely lower that derailleur cage and line it up with the large ring, 2 mm above the tallest teeth, not those worn "pre-worn" teeth. You could do it, dbcycle with an allen wrench, but then you'd have to take out the slack in the cable and make sure it shifts ok.

  10. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fredrico View Post
    Very interesting. These rings are "pre-worn" for your cycling comfort! Shimano does this, too.

    The "ramps" on the teeth look exactly like wear marks. Oh well, so much for modern technology.

    I've got about 50,000 miles each on two bike since I last changed the chain rings. They don't look nearly as "worn" as the one OP posted. The teeth engaged on the down strokes are slightly more worn than the other teeth. After 50,000 miles, it pretty much comes down to pedaling style. If I'd mashed those miles, the rings would have been history a long time ago.

    Yes, definitely lower that derailleur cage and line it up with the large ring, 2 mm above the tallest teeth, not those worn "pre-worn" teeth. You could do it, dbcycle with an allen wrench, but then you'd have to take out the slack in the cable and make sure it shifts ok.
    Yes--I have watched some YouTube videos on how to lower the FD but feel like it would just be easier for me as newbie to ask the LBS to do it.

  11. #36
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    Take it to a different LBS, those guys had their chance to adj when they filed the tooth down. You'll be better off in the long run.
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  12. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by duriel View Post
    Take it to a different LBS, those guys had their chance to adj when they filed the tooth down. You'll be better off in the long run.
    Yeah, you'd think if the mech took the time to file off the tooth, he would have checked to see if the chain shifted ok.

  13. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fredrico View Post
    I've got about 50,000 miles each on two bike since I last changed the chain rings. They don't look nearly as "worn" as the one OP posted.
    Which generation chainrings were those you are using? 50,000 miles ago, I'm pretty sure they was designed differently. I won't even ask you what year you started using those cranksets. Have you looked at a brand new one lately to see what it looks like?
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

    "Beware of geeks bearing formulas."
    -- Warren Buffett

    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



  14. #39
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    Art's Cyclery is your friend. They have lots of good tutorials:

    How To Adjust Shimano Mechanical Road Front Derailleurs
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

    "Beware of geeks bearing formulas."
    -- Warren Buffett

    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



  15. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dbcycle4 View Post
    In all honesty, I don't know how it happened. I'm not saying it is not my fault, only that I don't know... Just frustrating to have it happen w/n the first 2 weeks and not have a definitive answer as to how.
    I was't trying to imply you were lying. Sorry if you took it that way.
    My point was that it's hard to believe that could happen from ordinary bicycle use. And the only reason I mentioned it was because that is what I'd anticipate anyone fielding a warranty inquiry will think too so you may as well hear it here first.

    Again though, call Praxis.

  16. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    Which generation chainrings were those you are using? 50,000 miles ago, I'm pretty sure they was designed differently. I won't even ask you what year you started using those cranksets. Have you looked at a brand new one lately to see what it looks like?
    The chainrings are old Campy Nuovo and Super Record from the late 70s-early '80s, before click shifting and subsequent "pre-worn" chain rings came about to presumably facilitate smoother shifting. It wasn't an issue with friction shifters.

    The teeth are thicker, too, therefore stand up longer than modern 10 and 11 speed teeth.
    Last edited by Fredrico; 06-13-2017 at 11:23 AM.

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