Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 26 to 30 of 30
  1. #26
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    265
    Quote Originally Posted by stan01 View Post
    What does Cannondale have anything to do with any of this?? Do you know how many different headset standards there are? People always want lighter, stiffer, faster bikes & the manufacturers complied. You cant't offer the public those things without breaking some eggs.

    Bigger bottom bracket shells = greater stiffness & allows larger tube shapes for aerodynamics. The same thing happened with the headtube area. All this stuff was going to happen regardless. But I do understand your intent if somewhat misguided.
    Greater stiffness. Here we go again with that BS that gets thrown around recklessly.

    Do you or anyone have any hard, non-anecdotal evidence that stiffness has been enhanced by the larger BB standards? Or are you just blindly repeating what you've heard?

    All of these things you've mentioned could easily have been provided while keeping the standard English threaded system and 24mm spindles.

  2. #27
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: bikerjulio's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    7,352
    Since the OP has picked up the toys he threw out of the pram and toddled off into the distance, I'm going to give my $0.02 to this drift.

    I agree at least mostly with waspy:

    I don't have a single "wide BB" bike and they are plenty stiff.

    Cannondale had stiff, fat tube frames that were English BB. The shell width is the same on BB30 and BSA after all.

    BB30 was a flawed standard that never really took off. For about the first 12 years of it's existence, nobody else in the frame and components business was interested.

    The big lie was "lower Q factor" which if repeated enough gets believed.

    If you want a villain it would be SRAM who came up with PF30 and all of a sudden the frames were easier and cheaper to make, and BB30 all of a sudden had a new life.
    We just don’t realize the most significant moments of our lives when they’re happening
    Back then I thought “well there'll be other days”
    I didn’t realize that was the only day
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y9yrupye7B0

    There's sometimes a buggy.
    How many drivers does a buggy have?
    One.
    So let's just say I'm drivin' this buggy...
    and if you fix your attitude you can ride along with me.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GekiIMh4ZkM

  3. #28
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    129
    Quote Originally Posted by Waspinator View Post
    Greater stiffness. Here we go again with that BS that gets thrown around recklessly.

    Do you or anyone have any hard, non-anecdotal evidence that stiffness has been enhanced by the larger BB standards? Or are you just blindly repeating what you've heard?

    All of these things you've mentioned could easily have been provided while keeping the standard English threaded system and 24mm spindles.
    As I stated, I totally understand where you're coming from. I love the BSA standard & every bike I've owned with that standard was not only easy to work on but rode plenty stiff for me. I do think that putting blame on one company though is misguided.

    The gold standard for cranks has always been Dura Ace with the 24 mm spindle. The only thing lacking about it is weight. The BB wars started because bike buyers always want lighter & stiffer everything. A larger diameter alloy spindle in any of the other standards plus the advantages of larger bearings will unfortunately eclipse that of the 24 mm Dura Ace spindle design in terms of weight & stiffness.

    Stiffness is a subjective term. What may be fine for one person is totally unacceptable for another. Sean Kelly won for years on a Vitus which was notorious for its flex. What I can say is that companies spend a lot of money testing their products making sure that each iteration is lighter & stiffer than its predecessor. Can bikes be made with the BSA English standard to be just as stiff & light as any of the other new standards? Maybe up to a point.

    BB386 was created because, "A standard 68mm BB shell width allows a down tube or seat tube diameter of around 63mm maximum. The BB386EVO system allows a much more generous amount of area, up to around 83mm. This solution can really increase frame stiffness, and using the press fit cups allows the frame maker to eliminate any alloy insert into the BB shell, for a big weight reduction." As stated by FSA in their technical document when commissioned by Wilier & BH bikes for the BB386EVo standard. BB90 provides an even greater surface area. Does Trek make good bikes?

    Of course those weren't the only reasons. Lower cost of manufacturing is another benefit obviously. But with Aero frames becoming more prevalent, the larger available surface area of these BB standards can't be ignored. Again whether you want to point fingers at any one company or not, you can't stop progress for better or worse.

  4. #29
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Lombard's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    5,499
    As a 2014 Cannondale Synapse Carbon with a BB30 owner, I can say that the bike definitely feels stiffer than my older Trek Pilot OCLV with a standard threaded BB (Shimano Hollowtech II). However, I do not believe the stiffer feeling is a result of BB30, nor have I ever had a problem with the BB. I upgraded the Cannondale to full Shimano Ultegra 6800 at 3500 miles which required a simple Wheels Manufacturing adapter - no problem. At 7000 miles, still no problems with the BB.

    I just bought a new 2017 Jamis Renegade Exploit with a standard threaded BB (Hollowtech II). It feels no less stiff in the BB area than my BB30 Cannondale.

    Just a few observations.
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

    "Beware of geeks bearing formulas."
    -- Warren Buffett

    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



  5. #30
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Notvintage's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    1,081
    Quote Originally Posted by Wattup View Post
    Building a Chinese carbon frame . . .
    Good luck. LOL

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Similar Threads

  1. Help needed - can't get crank off bottom bracket
    By CRM in forum Components, Wrenching
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 12-14-2004, 10:47 AM
  2. Bottom Bracket situation, Please Help
    By Coppi1952 in forum Components, Wrenching
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 10-06-2004, 09:47 AM
  3. Bottom Bracket Help
    By paramountz in forum Components, Wrenching
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 07-12-2004, 05:01 PM
  4. Help with stuck bottom bracket
    By mfuchs in forum General Cycling Discussion
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 05-19-2004, 04:30 PM
  5. Bottom Bracket Help
    By morkm in forum Components, Wrenching
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 02-29-2004, 04:43 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •