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  1. #1
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Calfee tetra pro vs my steel custom

    I had a custom steel frame built out of sprit/life tubing. I love the ride of this bike.
    The weight is an acceptable 3pounds 3 ounces. Built it is just shy of 15#.
    The specs are as follows.
    Virt. TT=55.5
    ST= 54
    HT=162
    CS= 412
    WB=990
    HT angle= 73
    ST angle = 73
    Fork = ENVE 2.0 43

    Now I have a riding partner that is selling his Calfee tetra pro he had built in 08.
    The specs are as follows.
    TT= 55ctc
    ST=500 ctc
    HT 135
    CS= 42
    WB=990
    HT angle=73
    ST angle=72.5
    fork rake 43

    My question is what will the different angles be like compared to my current ride?
    I love the way his bike rides as it is a bit plusher ride on rough roads but sill has the snap
    out of the saddle and on climbs.
    I just sold a few of my bikes and am down to one now.
    It will be built up with 2008 10 speed record with some zero components 024 cordon tubulars.

    Thanks Brian
    Last edited by skiezo; 06-10-2012 at 08:56 AM. Reason: add text

  2. #2
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    If sounds like you can best answer that since you have ridden it?

    I have a Calfee Tetra tandem and it is the best riding and best made bike I have ever owned.
    It is exceptionally smooth and there is no flex that I can feel.
    Why is your friend selling it?

  3. #3
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    I believe that Calfee geometry was influenced to some extent by the affiliation with Greg Lemond for the Pro line of bikes. Stock models of the Pro are "stage racer" geometry with a slightly slacker seattube angle, in the Lemond/Merckx line of thinking. The main difference I see in specs is the head tube length, so there could be a greater saddle to handlebar drop.

    There are build options on a Calfee so the predicting the ride depends upon what your friend specified. They have a stiffer bottom bracket option, etc.

    I love my Calfee TetraPro from 2000. I had Craig ease the head tube angle from 73.5 back to 73 deg, but my frame is a 60cm. If you have sold off bikes looking for that perfect roadie, you should try a nice Ti frame as well as the carbon fibre.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Calfee tetra pro vs my steel custom-img_3890.jpg  

  4. #4
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    Talking to my fitter he said it would not fit the same as my current ride. Like was mentioned
    the seat to bar drop would be to great and the slacker ST would change some things. Now for the good news.
    We were riding today and talking about our past bikes. I asked what happened to the semi custom Dean El Vado he had built in 04/05.
    I was informed it has been hanging in his basement for the past few years. I took the spec/build sheet home and compared it to my current ride. All but spot on to my bike besides the 4.5 degree slope to the TT. Tiny dent in the TT and a bit dirty and dusty but it is now mine.
    The reason he is selling his tetra is he has an D'fly on order.
    This guy has a bit more disposable income than I do and goes through bikes quite a bit.
    He is 49 and a master racer so he knows what he likes,wants and needs. I like riding with him cause he pushes me to my limit and than some.
    Thanks for all the replies. I think I have been on the WW web site to much lately and thought
    ------ well you get the idea.
    Thanks Brian

  5. #5
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    There are only 3 really, really good carbon bike builders that I know of. Trek, Shrek and Wreck.

    Kidding, none of them. One is Formigli, the second is Parlee, and Calfee is the third (in no particular order). That said, all are custom builders so you will need to move your seat slightly further forwards and get a longer, more upright stem to fit near your current frame. But this may compromise the balance...

    I don't know Deans, though. The question for you is why you want to sell your current bike, or get a second one. If you're looking for a more comfortable distance machine to add to your collection then the Dean may be a good buy (depending on the money). If you are looking to replace your bike then I'd recommend you probably stay with your current bike.

  6. #6
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    I am Not looking to get rid of my current bike. I just sold a few to make room in my basement. I always had more than one bike as I like to switch up between bikes and such.
    I was looking at a carbon bike to see what the light bike craze is all about. Been reading weightweenies and fairwheelbikes forums a bit to much the past couple of weeks. What I have come to realize is that a light bike will not make me better/faster/yada/yada/yada.
    I know that a proper fitting/set up bike will do more for me than losing a pound of so on my ride.
    I am down to my riding weight now of 156 to 160 so a 15# bike is fine with me.
    I will be cleaning up the Dean this week and will start to get it together. Got a set of wheels at the LBS for some new spokes and bearings. Plenty of bars,stems,seatposts and saddles
    on the shelf. I got all the parts except a FD and fork. I will be ordering that stuff this week.
    Thanks for the help guys.
    Brain

  7. #7
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    The head tube on that Calfee is significantly shorter. So you will have more drop between the saddle and your stem, putting you in a more aggressive position. This may or may not be a problem, but is something to consider.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by skiezo View Post
    I had a custom steel frame built out of sprit/life tubing. I love the ride of this bike.
    The weight is an acceptable 3pounds 3 ounces. Built it is just shy of 15#.
    The specs are as follows.
    Virt. TT=55.5
    ST= 54
    HT=162
    CS= 412
    WB=990
    HT angle= 73
    ST angle = 73
    Fork = ENVE 2.0 43

    Thread drift: Who built this frame?

  9. #9
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    This frame was built by a guy in North Eastern Penna. His name is Rich Adams and his company is called around town bikes. Once I get home I will post some pics.
    It really is an amazing riding bike. Light, by my standards, stiff were it needs to be, but able to do 4 to 6 hours rides in comfort. And a great guy to work with to boot.
    I was thinking about a carbon frame but the more I ride this bike the more I love it.
    And besides, a 1 pound lighter frame will not make me a better or faster rider except in my own head.
    I found a few pics. Second one is my Rich Adams.
    I have changed out the stem,bars and seatpost and clamp since this pic was taken. The stem has also been flipped. There is some red "bling" parts added to make it a bit unique.
    The first is my custom Joe Williams from 02/03. The pic is a few years old and some stuff has been changed in the last few years. Namely the saddle,cages,wheels and pedals and the old computer has been replaced with a garmin edge 200.
    Got a dean el vado in the works.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Calfee tetra pro vs my steel custom-p1020482.jpg   Calfee tetra pro vs my steel custom-dsc_0366.jpg  
    Last edited by skiezo; 06-18-2012 at 08:03 AM. Reason: Add pics.

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