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  1. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by TDFbound View Post
    Lol why do you say that? I may be bigger than a lot of riders but that also means I put out more power than a lot of riders. I can tuck really small when pulling at the front of a pace line and ride a good number of people right off the back. Also helps me scream down the descents, but I'm still no match for a good tandem!
    Dude, he's trolling....

  2. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Keoki View Post
    Dude, he's trolling....
    Oh I have plenty of troll food

  3. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by TDFbound View Post
    Oh I have plenty of troll food
    No, no, no!
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    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

    "Beware of geeks bearing formulas."
    -- Warren Buffett

    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



  4. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by TDFbound View Post
    Well, I decided on a bike. I'll be ordering a Cannondale Synapse Carbon Disc Ultegra SE. My main reason for this is that it comes with not only Cannondale's new carbon cockpit pieces, but a rear derailleur capable of up to a 34-tooth cassette, which it comes equipped with. I'll buy an 11-30 I think to use for my normal riding, but having an 11-34 available for the more wicked rides will be a life saver. Anybody ever tried to ride up Brasstown Bald? I haven't yet, but I've walked up it and watched the pro's ride it, and I damn sure don't want to attempt it with my 12-27.

    Anyways, the Synapse Carbon Ultegra Disc SE ships with some OK aluminum rims with 21mm internal width and 30mm tires on them, which I'm curious to try out. For a wheel upgrade next Spring, I've decided on a set of Boyd carbon rims, most likely their 44mm deep rims, which have a 19mm internal width and should be great with a pair of 25mm Conti GP4000s II tires on them, which should measure closer to 27 or 28mm once inflated.

    This model of Synapse costs $3500, which is $1500 less than the Dura-Ace equipped version (oh how I do love the Dura-Ace group though). My budget for bicycle-related stuff is capped at $5000 until Christmas, so... as much as I do want Dura-Ace parts, the cost savings will allow me to instantly buy and equip a power meter, and still have the budget for a smart trainer like a Wahoo Kickr 2 later this December.

    I feel this will get me the best value for my dollar, especially considering my current level of fitness and that I don't plan on doing any important races in the next couple years. Training my body and fitness is top priority and the sooner I can start training with power on a comfortable bike the better off I will be, I hope. Maybe next Summer when I do my frame crash replacement I'll have decided whether to get a Hi-Mod SuperSix frame or stay with the Synapse and get a Hi-Mod Synapse frame. Only time will tell, I'll worry about that later.

    Given the information here, do you think I am making the right choice?
    I'm also looking at the SE and noticed that it seems like the best value in the range, coming with all the carbon SAVE parts and the hollowgram crank which don't even come with the ultegra di2 model.

    Also looking at the domane sl6 disc which is very similar spec for spec and the same price ,except it comes with a standard alloy stem and and bar - looks like trek sells their integrated carbon model that is similar to the SAVE systembar for an extra $500.

    Interested in hearing any thoughts.

  5. #30
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    In all honesty, get the Hi Mod frame. The standard carbon frame is just for the sake of having a carbon bike. My take is: Go Hi Mod. If you don't want Hi-Mod, go with the CAAD12. It will be a better bike than the standard carbon bike for the money. Several shops I've visited have said this, and I agree. You already have a CAAD so you probably don't want a 12. Get the Hi Mod.

  6. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by terbennett View Post
    In all honesty, get the Hi Mod frame. The standard carbon frame is just for the sake of having a carbon bike. My take is: Go Hi Mod. If you don't want Hi-Mod, go with the CAAD12. It will be a better bike than the standard carbon bike for the money. Several shops I've visited have said this, and I agree. You already have a CAAD so you probably don't want a 12. Get the Hi Mod.
    And what will the Hi-Mod get you over the standard carbon frame besides weighing 2lbs. less and making your wallet lighter? That's about it. The Hi-Mod is no stiffer.
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

    "Beware of geeks bearing formulas."
    -- Warren Buffett

    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



  7. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    And what will the Hi-Mod get you over the standard carbon frame besides weighing 2lbs. less and making your wallet lighter? That's about it. The Hi-Mod is no stiffer.
    Everything I gather has led me to believe that the hi-mod is less than 1lb lighter and has the same stiffness numbers. I'm taking the $1500 difference between the Ultegra Carbon Disc SE and the lowest equipped hi-mod and spending it on a new Quarq power meter. I plan on trading in my current CAAD7 frame as a crash replacement next year and getting a hi-mod frame from that. By then I should know if I want a second Synapse frame or if I want a SuperSix instead

  8. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Keoki View Post
    Wheels: Do yourself a favor and turn away from Edge wheels....err... oh wait they're now Mavic wheels. Instead, try Shimano C35 or C40 wheels - solid wheels at the price point.
    5-year warranty vs an industry standard of 2 make ENVE completely worth it. My friend just had his 6.7s with 25000 miles on them replaced with brand new 3.4s for free because the brake track was obviously wearing down at that point. Who else is going to do that? No one. Sure, in a disc brake world, brake track wear is a thing of the past, but I'm sure you can appreciate such a long warranty period on components that are worked as hard as wheels. Does Shimano do crash replacements for half price? Their service has been amazing to me.

    My only complaint about ENVEs are the internal nipples.

  9. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    And what will the Hi-Mod get you over the standard carbon frame besides weighing 2lbs. less and making your wallet lighter? That's about it. The Hi-Mod is no stiffer.
    Please provide source/link where it states that the Hi-mod is 2lbs lighter and is no stiffer.

  10. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Keoki View Post
    Please provide source/link where it states that the Hi-mod is 2lbs lighter and is no stiffer.
    Don't believe me? Test ride both and see for yourself.
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

    "Beware of geeks bearing formulas."
    -- Warren Buffett

    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



  11. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    Don't believe me? Test ride both and see for yourself.
    I have in 2015 and it was only a 0.6lb difference... Although that could've changed for 2016/7.

  12. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Keoki View Post
    I have in 2015 and it was only a 0.6lb difference... Although that could've changed for 2016/7.
    Are you sure you don't mean kg? If not, I stand corrected on that point. So even less reason to spend the extra $$$ on the Hi-Mod.
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

    "Beware of geeks bearing formulas."
    -- Warren Buffett

    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



  13. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    Are you sure you don't mean kg? If not, I stand corrected on that point. So even less reason to spend the extra $$$ on the Hi-Mod.
    2lbs is almost the difference between the Hi-Mod and my steel Ritchey frame, so you're way, way, way off. IIRC the HM frame weighs around 800g and the normal SSix frame weighs around 1000g. The HM fork also weighs a slight bit less, so a .6lb difference sounds about right.

    The reason to buy a Hi-Mod is simple. Because you can.

  14. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by ceugene View Post
    5-year warranty vs an industry standard of 2 make ENVE completely worth it. My friend just had his 6.7s with 25000 miles on them replaced with brand new 3.4s for free because the brake track was obviously wearing down at that point. Who else is going to do that? No one. Sure, in a disc brake world, brake track wear is a thing of the past, but I'm sure you can appreciate such a long warranty period on components that are worked as hard as wheels. Does Shimano do crash replacements for half price? Their service has been amazing to me.

    My only complaint about ENVEs are the internal nipples.
    I have no idea about crash replacements for Shimano wheels, but I do know that Zipp/SRAM is the best company to deal with for all warranty/returns/replacements in the industry.

    Also, I'd like to add that Enve/Edge/Mavic (same BS wheels) does not perform any better than the "cheap" Shimano wheels.

    The internal spoke design is one of their key selling points. Please don't hurt their feelings.

  15. #40
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    I see there's no way to discuss this objectively with you.

    Their service has been exemplary, same with SRAM/Zipp if not a little easier to get ahold of. SRAM prefers you go through your LBS, but ENVE makes it easy to contact them directly for warranty service.

    As for comparisons to other rims, I would gladly buy a pair of Shimano or Zipps if they made a model I specifically wanted. My SES 5.6 Disc wheels were laced to the hub of my choice at purchase time...neither Shimano nor Zipp offer that. My wheels are also 29,28mm wide, 54,63mm deep while staying right at 1550g, and they're tubeless compatible.

    Zipp is in a weird spot where some of their rims are wide, some are pedestrian. Some are tubeless, some aren't (like any of the NSWs.) Across the board they are a slight bit heavier than similarly deep ENVEs. I'd need a good reason to stay away from ENVEs besides your questionable feelings for them.
    Last edited by ceugene; 4 Weeks Ago at 10:59 AM.

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