Page 2 of 7 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast
Results 26 to 50 of 163
  1. #26
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    51
    I'm pretty pleased with my Lynskey. Less expensive than the Moots or the Seven. Those boys in Chattanooga have been building Ti for as long as anybody.

  2. #27
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    1,238
    Quote Originally Posted by DHerz View Post
    I'm pretty pleased with my Lynskey. Less expensive than the Moots or the Seven. Those boys in Chattanooga have been building Ti for as long as anybody.
    Too bad they suck now...

  3. #28
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    51
    Quote Originally Posted by Keoki View Post
    Too bad they suck now...
    Well, that's just, like, your opinion, man. Not mine.

  4. #29
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    34
    I'm convinced that Lynskey needs a cool cast, milled or laser cut head tube badge. Then they could charge as much as Moots or Seven. I don't think you could tell the difference between the three in a blind test. If you go custom, then Seven would be my choice.

  5. #30
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Cni2i's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    1,792
    Quote Originally Posted by aclinjury View Post
    Not sure what's your size is, but here's a nice 55cm Lemond Tete de Course frame with 550 miles on it. Price is about $1000. (btw the cheapest Chinese ti frame you'll find on the net is about that much). Shame it's not my size or else..
    A little too big for me. My Tarmacs are all 54s. I can go smaller like a 52 or 53 but prefer not to go bigger. Thanks 4 looking out.
    EyeGuy

  6. #31
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Cni2i's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    1,792
    Quote Originally Posted by DHerz View Post
    I'm pretty pleased with my Lynskey. Less expensive than the Moots or the Seven. Those boys in Chattanooga have been building Ti for as long as anybody.
    The bike I tried was a Lynskey Helix. It felt great. I prefer traditional downtubes however.
    EyeGuy

  7. #32
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    439
    Quote Originally Posted by Cni2i View Post
    The bike I tried was a Lynskey Helix. It felt great. I prefer traditional downtubes however.
    I've been riding a Lynskey Helix OS for six years and have been very pleased. Very stiff frame and Lynskey has good customer support. Moots, Seven, IF, etc. Lots of good frames out there

  8. #33
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    7,860
    Quote Originally Posted by tvad View Post
    Why is Seven a safer choice than Moots?
    Not to speak for him but they weren't recently sold to a telecommunications guy like Moots could be one of his reasons for thinking Seven is a safer choice.

  9. #34
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    3,947
    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Strongbow View Post
    Not to speak for him but they weren't recently sold to a telecommunications guy like Moots could be one of his reasons for thinking Seven is a safer choice.
    New owner is "a passionate mountain biker and road cyclist", according to the Velo News article, and has good business credentials as well as serving on the board of trustees of The Nature Conservancy of Arkansas.

    I don't see anything to suggest Moots would not continue strongly going forward.

  10. #35
    pmf
    pmf is offline
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    4,385
    If you want the original Moots, the guy is still in business Welcome to Kent Eriksen Cycles - Custom titanium bikes and frames

  11. #36
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    187
    Here are some pics of Kent Eriksen operation in Steamboat Springs:

    Considering Titanium Road Bike Build-img_9282.jpgConsidering Titanium Road Bike Build-img_9283.jpgConsidering Titanium Road Bike Build-img_9284.jpgConsidering Titanium Road Bike Build-img_9285.jpg

  12. #37
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    187
    Here are some pics of Moots operation in Steamboat Springs:]

    Considering Titanium Road Bike Build-img_9349.jpgConsidering Titanium Road Bike Build-img_9347.jpgConsidering Titanium Road Bike Build-img_9341.jpgConsidering Titanium Road Bike Build-img_9335.jpgConsidering Titanium Road Bike Build-img_9353.jpgConsidering Titanium Road Bike Build-img_9350.jpg

  13. #38
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    3,148
    Quote Originally Posted by Cni2i View Post
    A little too big for me. My Tarmacs are all 54s. I can go smaller like a 52 or 53 but prefer not to go bigger. Thanks 4 looking out.
    Don't rule out Habanero without ruling them out with some perusing and research...

    Titanium Road Frames from $995

    Classic Road Frame only $995 plus $40 shipping ($70 to most of Europe)

    Options with reasonable waits as well. Standard frames ship pretty fast as I understand it. The crash policy is pretty liberal too!

    Also look for the silver series Lynsky offerings if you are a lighter cyclist and don't ride huge long tubes frames. ;)

    I have spoke with Habanaro and nibbled but went steel instead personally.
    Seems like he would be a good guy to do business with is what I was left with... YMMV.. No affiliation.
    Quote Originally Posted by Robt57/Me!
    Everything you read that I post is just '1' guy's opinion, try to sort it all out best you can. ;) I will try to add value in my posts, if I miss the mark please let me know using a little decorum.

  14. #39
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Posts
    1
    I'm glad I found this thread. I feel like everywhere I read Ti is dead and carbon is the only material to build bikes from now. Anyhow, I've been thinking about building up a new all-around-bike (using up some older parts) and I found a Litespeed Copenhagen at The Racery for only $799. It looks like a sweet deal and with free shipping it's even sweeter .
    I was on an aluminum C'dale for awhile and then switched over to a carbon Specialized, and both were good bikes. But I'm thinking for some longer days in the saddle a Ti bike might be the best option. I noticed the Racery had a few Ti mountain bikes too, but I don't have enough cash for that right now. Someday.

  15. #40
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Cni2i's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    1,792
    Man, I'm learning a lot about Ti bikes...thanks for all the responses thus far.

    One recurring sentiment about Ti versus Carbon is that Ti bikes are "better" for longer endurance type of rides (centuries, gran fondos, and X racing) or as a commuter bike; whereas carbon bikes are more geared towards racing (crits or fast and spirited testosterone-filled group rides). As I have mentioned earlier, I am so used to riding with my SWTarmacs and I love the lively feel of the bikes. I don't do a lot of long endurance rides (maybe two centuries yearly), but do a lot of hill climbs (about 800,000' annually recorded on my Garmin 510 not iPhone or corrected Garmin elevation...lol, but that's for another thread) and spirited group rides. So I am a little bit concerned that the Ti bike may not feel as lively or responsive as my Tarmac??? Since I am still leaning towards the no.22 Reactor frame set, I don't want to spend that can of $ and find out I don't like the "feel" of the bike. I would be swapping out my components from one of my Tarmacs, so that would all stay the same...just the frame and fork would change. Both will have PF bottom bracket. The only other difference would be that the Reactor would have an ISP. Aaarggghh....such a hard decision. Nevertheless, love seeing all this interest and information about Ti bikes!
    EyeGuy

  16. #41
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    7,860
    Quote Originally Posted by Cni2i View Post
    Man, I'm learning a lot about Ti bikes...thanks for all the responses thus far.

    One recurring sentiment about Ti versus Carbon is that Ti bikes are "better" for longer endurance type of rides (centuries, gran fondos, and X racing) or as a commuter bike; whereas carbon bikes are more geared towards racing (crits or fast and spirited testosterone-filled group rides). As I have mentioned earlier, I am so used to riding with my SWTarmacs and I love the lively feel of the bikes. I don't do a lot of long endurance rides (maybe two centuries yearly), but do a lot of hill climbs (about 800,000' annually recorded on my Garmin 510 not iPhone or corrected Garmin elevation...lol, but that's for another thread) and spirited group rides. So I am a little bit concerned that the Ti bike may not feel as lively or responsive as my Tarmac??? Since I am still leaning towards the no.22 Reactor frame set, I don't want to spend that can of $ and find out I don't like the "feel" of the bike. I would be swapping out my components from one of my Tarmacs, so that would all stay the same...just the frame and fork would change. Both will have PF bottom bracket. The only other difference would be that the Reactor would have an ISP. Aaarggghh....such a hard decision. Nevertheless, love seeing all this interest and information about Ti bikes!
    To quote myself: "But concentrate on getting the right fit and design because bikes aren't a certain way just because of what they are made of."

    Ti bikes aren't good for long rides because they are made of Ti and Carbon bikes aren't snappy and responsive just because they are carbon. It just so happens that a lot of ti bikes are comfortable and a lot of carbon bikes are responsive but you really need to get it out of your head that a certain material rides a certain way and don't expect that just because a bike is a certain material it'll ride a certain way. Bikes ride the way they do not because of what they are made of but because of how they are designed.

  17. #42
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Cni2i's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    1,792
    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Strongbow View Post
    To quote myself: "But concentrate on getting the right fit and design because bikes aren't a certain way just because of what they are made of."

    Ti bikes aren't good for long rides because they are made of Ti and Carbon bikes aren't snappy and responsive just because they are carbon. It just so happens that a lot of ti bikes are comfortable and a lot of carbon bikes are responsive but you really need to get it out of your head that a certain material rides a certain way and don't expect that just because a bike is a certain material it'll ride a certain way. Bikes ride the way they do not because of what they are made of but because of how they are designed.
    Point taken Jay. So in theory, if a Ti frame and a Carbon frame had the exact same geometry and components (and all fitting measurements were the same), they should pretty ride the same way...and the only real/noticeable differences would be the weight difference and the aesthetics?
    EyeGuy

  18. #43
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    187
    Quote Originally Posted by BikerTex View Post
    I'm glad I found this thread. I feel like everywhere I read Ti is dead and carbon is the only material to build bikes from now. Anyhow, I've been thinking about building up a new all-around-bike (using up some older parts) and I found a Litespeed Copenhagen at The Racery for only $799. It looks like a sweet deal and with free shipping it's even sweeter .
    I was on an aluminum C'dale for awhile and then switched over to a carbon Specialized, and both were good bikes. But I'm thinking for some longer days in the saddle a Ti bike might be the best option. I noticed the Racery had a few Ti mountain bikes too, but I don't have enough cash for that right now. Someday.
    Looks like that frame is priced only for a small size if I read their site correctly.

  19. #44
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    3,947
    Quote Originally Posted by Cni2i View Post
    Point taken Jay. So in theory, if a Ti frame and a Carbon frame had the exact same geometry and components (and all fitting measurements were the same), they should pretty ride the same way...
    I disagree with that assessment. Tube selection has a great deal to do with how a bike rides; shape, thickness, and carbon lay-up all make a difference. Are the tubes selected for stiffness, flexibility, damping (of road buzz)?

    Tube selection and its relation to ride quality applies equally to Ti, carbon and steel.

  20. #45
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: bikerjulio's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    7,363
    The only other difference would be that the Reactor would have an ISP
    Sorry, but I have to say that ISP, like multi material frames, is not only passe, but a really stupid idea, that really has no advantages whatsoever, but plenty of drawbacks.
    Last edited by bikerjulio; 01-20-2016 at 04:13 PM.
    We just don’t realize the most significant moments of our lives when they’re happening
    Back then I thought “well there'll be other days”
    I didn’t realize that was the only day
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y9yrupye7B0

    There's sometimes a buggy.
    How many drivers does a buggy have?
    One.
    So let's just say I'm drivin' this buggy...
    and if you fix your attitude you can ride along with me.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GekiIMh4ZkM

  21. #46
    mrwirey
    Reputation: mrwirey's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    195
    Quote Originally Posted by bikerjulio View Post
    Sorry, but I have to say that ISP, like multi material frames, is not only passe, but a really stupid idea, that really has not advantages whatsoever, but plenty of drawbacks.
    bikerjulio,
    I guess I should've asked everyone's opinion 2 years ago before commissioning this build ... At least I got the groupset correct.


    Considering Titanium Road Bike Build-cysco-ti.jpg

    Considering Titanium Road Bike Build-cysco-ti-bare-frame.jpg

    Very respectfully, Tim

    P.S. Should I 'chop' the seatmast off my 2015 Trek Madone 7s and mash a seatpost in the hole to remove all the associated seatmast/ISP disadvantages?
    Last edited by mrwirey; 01-20-2016 at 03:18 PM.
    "Anything can be a torch if you set it on fire"

  22. #47
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: bikerjulio's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    7,363
    Yes you got the group right. I realize it's your baby, but nothing I see changes my opinion of ISPs. And opinions are what one gets on the interwebz.

    The orange theme looks suspiciously like an homage to my orange Ti bike that was posted a few years ago
    We just don’t realize the most significant moments of our lives when they’re happening
    Back then I thought “well there'll be other days”
    I didn’t realize that was the only day
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y9yrupye7B0

    There's sometimes a buggy.
    How many drivers does a buggy have?
    One.
    So let's just say I'm drivin' this buggy...
    and if you fix your attitude you can ride along with me.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GekiIMh4ZkM

  23. #48
    mrwirey
    Reputation: mrwirey's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    195
    Quote Originally Posted by bikerjulio View Post
    Yes you got the group right. I realize it's your baby, but nothing I see changes my opinion of ISPs. And opinions are what one gets on the interwebz.
    bikerjulio,
    It's all good. This is just one of many bikes in my garage ... I don't associate my identity with any of them so I don't take anything personal. And yes, I realize one has to have a thick skin to play on "the Interwebz."

    I just have dozens of bikes with seatposts so I figured since Trek was using ISPs on all their newly fangled carbon bikes; I should give it a go. once I got my seat set to the correct height (took all of about 30 seconds) I've never touched it. I really don't notice it unless someone asks about it.

    No real downside to an ISP for me as most of my rides leave from my driveway and I have two Ritchey travel bikes in case I need to fold something into a suitcase for a trip.

    I think the important thing to remember is, "Campagnolo Rules!" After that, everything else falls into place.

    Very respectfully, Tim
    "Anything can be a torch if you set it on fire"

  24. #49
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: bikerjulio's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    7,363
    You either need more orange, or less.

    I ended up taking all the orange off mine, but here it is in all it's orangeness

    Considering Titanium Road Bike Build-4861315267_8095e1c2a0_b.jpg

    Very funny BTW
    I figured since Trek was using ISPs
    We just don’t realize the most significant moments of our lives when they’re happening
    Back then I thought “well there'll be other days”
    I didn’t realize that was the only day
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y9yrupye7B0

    There's sometimes a buggy.
    How many drivers does a buggy have?
    One.
    So let's just say I'm drivin' this buggy...
    and if you fix your attitude you can ride along with me.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GekiIMh4ZkM

  25. #50
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    3,148
    Quote Originally Posted by bikerjulio View Post
    You either need more orange, or less.

    I ended up taking all the orange off mine, but here it is in all it's orangeness

    Very funny BTW
    Orange is the old... something, right? ;)

    What is your beef with ISP? I tried a search for you username and ISP and got nada.

    I have one ISP, carbon. I do not see any reason it is a bad thing, I did not nor will I yearn for it on a future bike. OH, one bad thing might be how selling it used folks see to avoid making it less sell-able probably. ;)

    I have to say a Ti ISP would concern me if not stiff enough, not a problem on my Addict LTD carbon ISP. But in the scheme of expensive carbon flexy make ride nice posts doesn't it make some sense?
    Quote Originally Posted by Robt57/Me!
    Everything you read that I post is just '1' guy's opinion, try to sort it all out best you can. ;) I will try to add value in my posts, if I miss the mark please let me know using a little decorum.

Page 2 of 7 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Titanium Road bike question
    By Buster65 in forum Bikes, Frames and Forks
    Replies: 30
    Last Post: 12-31-2015, 09:13 AM
  2. Best titanium road bike for under $4000.
    By Motomadman in forum Motobecane - Mercier
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 12-09-2014, 03:33 PM
  3. Best titanium road bike for under $4000.
    By Motomadman in forum Hot Deals
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 12-04-2014, 08:31 AM
  4. What wheels do you have on your titanium road bike?
    By sdlesko in forum Wheels and Tires
    Replies: 190
    Last Post: 08-31-2014, 12:12 AM
  5. My Very First Road Bike- Steel or Titanium
    By hrdkorsocerplyr in forum Bikes, Frames and Forks
    Replies: 45
    Last Post: 03-19-2013, 11:58 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •