Page 7 of 7 FirstFirst ... 567
Results 151 to 163 of 163
  1. #151
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    53
    7 months to delivery. Went to the "barn" and got fitted plus a big bowl of spaghetti for lunch. Great fitting experience, result perfect for me. Seven does the welding for Tom.

  2. #152
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Cni2i's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    1,747
    Well, my No.22 Reactor was delivered and finally built up last Friday. Since then, I've put in 5 rides with approx. 150 total miles and 19,000' of elevation. Just wanted to give my impressions of the bike and the ride.

    Background first: Been riding Sworks Tarmacs for the past 4-5 years. The most current SW Tarmac (2015) is set up very similarly to the Reactor (2016). The main differences (beside the actual frame set of course) are: Tarmac (Ventoux Gipfelsturm), Reactor (Enve 3.4s), Tarmac (SW cranks), Reactor (Cannondale SiSL2), Reactor (Integrated seat post), Tarmac (press fit BB), Reactor (threaded T47 BB). Both have full Enve cockpit and DA 9000 mechanical, ee brakes and LOOK pedals.

    SWTarmac weighs in ~ 14.01 lbs. No. 22 Reactor ~ 15.03 lbs....both with pedals and cages and Enve garmin mounts.

    Okay, onto the ride impressions (remember, just my impressions and opinions):

    First of all, the no. 22 Reactor looks stunning...even more so in person. The attention to details is top notch. Maybe this is common with custom built bikes, don't know b/c this is my first. All I can say is that she is definitely a looker.

    Okay, the ride. This may partly be attributed to the new bike syndrome....but the Reactor is just a blast to ride. Hard to pinpoint why, but it's very engaging. Since I enjoy the climbing aspect of road cycling a lot, that's where I was most concerned about when comparing the Tarmac to the Reactor. Unfortunately, I have to say that the Reactor just wasn't as reactive and explosive as the Tarmac. It was only one pound heavier(?), but it just didn't have that immediate surge on the hills that I was accustomed to with the Tarmac, whether in or out of the saddle. Once you get into a steady groove/pace, then the Reactor felt great. It was no slouch on the climbs, just not as explosive IMO.

    On the descents, I finally understand what people say about a bike feeling "twitchy". When descending straight away or around corners, I felt less confident on the Reacto. The words "twitchy" and/or "jittery" again come to mind. It just didn't seem to corner as well; ie., wider turns rather than hugging the corners. Not sure if I was just being more cautious b/c it was a "new" bike and I just didn't know her as well as my Tarmacs. Again, it wasn't that the Reactor was bad in any way, it's just didn't impart that high level of confidence in me that I normally have with my Tarmacs.

    On the flats, the Reactor was on par with the Tarmac. Once the Reactor got going, she seemed to be able to hold speeds just as well as my Tarmacs. A blast to ride!

    I should have mentioned this earlier, but the Reactor saddle height can probably be tweaked just a bit...~0.5-0.6 cm. It has an ISP, so the shop didn't want to be too aggressive and left the saddle height a bit taller than my current Tarmac set up. It was about 1.2 cm taller initially, then I had them sand the carbon post down another 0.5 cm or so. It definitely felt better after sanding down that 0.5 cm. I never had any rear knee pain or felt too stretched, but I could definitely feel that it was higher than what I a accustomed to. I want to ride her a little more before deciding to save off another 0.5 cm.

    Anyways, just a brief summary of my experience thus far with my first titanium bike. Again, I really LOVE the combination of the old school-like Ti frame with modern carbon parts and wheels. Definitely a keeper!!

    Final note: no. 22 as a company was fantastic to deal with. One of their owners helped me through the entire process. Ran into some "issues" post delivery (not their fault), and they helped be resolve it quickly! Very responsive to questions and respond quickly to emails...and trust me, I had plenty of questions.
    Last edited by Cni2i; 05-05-2016 at 06:29 PM.
    EyeGuy

  3. #153
    pmf
    pmf is offline
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    4,197
    Sure is a glowing review -- fizzles on the climbs, twitchy on the descents and wide turns that don't hug the corners. Sounds like you spent over $10k on this bike -- better be a keeper.

    I guess to me, a titanium bike is a bike made of titanium. Not a bike with a carbon seat tube that doubles as a seat post. Cut that thing too short and you can never get it back. Kind of limits resale, but I guess since this is a keeper, that's not a problem.

    The discussion on the website (https://22bicycles.com/products/reactor) makes it sound like the number one object in manufacturing this frame is light weight. Super light weight often comes with a cost. I remember years ago, Litespeed came out with this super light weight frame the Ghisallo. It was marketed as the world's lightest production frame. It had a rider weight limit of 160 lbs and was reportedly a noodle.

    Maybe that's why it fizzles compared to your Specialized bike. Titanium frames can't be made as light as carbon frames without sacrificing something. A good titanium frame is going to weigh a few pounds more which amounts to the weight of a full water bottle.

    Interesting looking bike. Hope it grows on you.

  4. #154
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    182
    Quote Originally Posted by Cni2i View Post
    I think you hit the nail on the head. That is what I was trying to say. As you and Richard L above said, there is just less chatter and less "noise" overall. It's almost like riding in well-built V6-V8 SUV versus a modified 4 cylinder tubo-charged sports car. The SUV is mostly quiet and smooth but can go fast confidently once it picks up speed; whereas the sports car is more nimble and more responsive but inside cabin noise is louder and you can feel every little bump on the road.
    I owned a Moots Vamoots CR for about 18 mos. I absolutely loved it going down hill. I missed the snap of my Landshark Steel bike that I rode for 12 yrs. Overall, I felt the Ti muted a little too much of my ride. I ended up selling it and buying a very good Carbon bike. That was after test riding the carbon bike for a weekend. I still miss the quick, snappy feel of my steel bike. If I had a "do over" I would have bought another custom steel bike. Regardless, I don't think you can go wrong with a good Ti bike.

  5. #155
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Cni2i's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    1,747
    Quote Originally Posted by pmf View Post
    Sure is a glowing review -- fizzles on the climbs, twitchy on the descents and wide turns that don't hug the corners. Sounds like you spent over $10k on this bike -- better be a keeper.

    I guess to me, a titanium bike is a bike made of titanium. Not a bike with a carbon seat tube that doubles as a seat post. Cut that thing too short and you can never get it back. Kind of limits resale, but I guess since this is a keeper, that's not a problem.

    The discussion on the website (https://22bicycles.com/products/reactor) makes it sound like the number one object in manufacturing this frame is light weight. Super light weight often comes with a cost. I remember years ago, Litespeed came out with this super light weight frame the Ghisallo. It was marketed as the world's lightest production frame. It had a rider weight limit of 160 lbs and was reportedly a noodle.

    Maybe that's why it fizzles compared to your Specialized bike. Titanium frames can't be made as light as carbon frames without sacrificing something. A good titanium frame is going to weigh a few pounds more which amounts to the weight of a full water bottle.

    Interesting looking bike. Hope it grows on you.
    No on the $10K...LOL. All components (including the wheels) except for the cranks were from another bike that I sold. Got the cranks from a local cyclist so close to 60% less than MSRP (brand new too). But sure, it's not an inexpensive frame set.

    Resale....not really a concern of mine for a bike like this. Specialized bikes and other mass produced bikes...sure I think about resale b/c I don't tend to keep them that long.

    Yeah, and thanks for your concern that the bike will grow on me...it didn't have to. I liked the way it looked from the get go. But if you meant grow on me in terms of ride characteristics...not worried there either. Different feel than the Tarmac, but again, that should be expected. Secondly, only 5 relatively short rides and still have to adjust saddle height a bit.
    EyeGuy

  6. #156
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    438
    Your No. 22 sounds awesome. I have a PF30 on my 2010 Lynskey with no issues. Also, I know of one builder who will convert a PF30 to T47 if someone has problems. i use a Chris King bottom bracket.

  7. #157
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Cni2i's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    1,747
    Quote Originally Posted by Lookbiker View Post
    Your No. 22 sounds awesome. I have a PF30 on my 2010 Lynskey with no issues. Also, I know of one builder who will convert a PF30 to T47 if someone has problems. i use a Chris King bottom bracket.
    Thank you. Yeah, I was initially going to have it built as a PF30...but then the T47 option was presented to me. To me, it just seemed like the best of both worlds...oversized BB that is also threaded. I wasn't sure at first if I would like how it would look as I've seen a couple that didn't look very "clean". But I am very happy how mine turned out. Most of my previous and current Tarmacs have had PF30 BBs, and for the most part, they have worked fine. I do get some noise down there on one of my Tarmacs, but the other one is fairly quiet.

    Will post up some pics once I have time to take decent ones.
    EyeGuy

  8. #158
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Cni2i's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    1,747


    Recent photos.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    EyeGuy

  9. #159
    lyleseven
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    484

    Wink Ti bikes and 50+

    Sounds like you are a bit younger than the 50+ group and just can't afford the wonders of titanium!
    Quote Originally Posted by Keoki View Post
    Go Ti if you want to join the 50+ year Olds.

    Oh, fyi, the hipsters are into fixed gear regardless of frame material.

  10. #160
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    3,000
    Quote Originally Posted by Keoki View Post
    Go Ti if you want to join the 50+ year Olds.

    Oh, fyi, the hipsters are into fixed gear regardless of frame material.
    Sorry this is just silly. Titanium can be made into any kind of road bike to suit any type of riding style. Same thing for steel. If a newer rider isn't on one its most likely that the average Titanium frame costs a bit more.

  11. #161
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Cni2i's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    1,747
    Quote Originally Posted by Trek_5200 View Post
    Sorry this is just silly. Titanium can be made into any kind of road bike to suit any type of riding style. Same thing for steel. If a newer rider isn't on one its most likely that the average Titanium frame costs a bit more.
    Agreed. Custom high quality Ti frame set alone often costs more than your run of the mill off -the- self carbon bikes. I think carbon is still the rage, so many "newbie" will go carbon b/c bigger shops sell them and many of their friends ride them. I was one of those too. After riding carbon to awhile, I just wanted to try something different. Ended up with no. 22 Reactor. Let me tell you, it's no "old man's" bike; i.e. If you are fit and like pushing your bike to its limits, you will appreciate it, at ANY age.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    EyeGuy

  12. #162
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    7,413
    Quote Originally Posted by Trek_5200 View Post
    Sorry this is just silly. Titanium can be made into any kind of road bike to suit any type of riding style. Same thing for steel. If a newer rider isn't on one its most likely that the average Titanium frame costs a bit more.
    I know the spirit of his comment was pretty stupid. But the funny thing is I can pretty much guarantee he has no idea how fast some 50+ year olds are and wouldn't have a prayer of hanging with them.
    It's an endurance sport not NFL. If you want to insult someone based on demographics being over 50 is a dumb way to do it.

  13. #163
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    3,000
    deleted

Page 7 of 7 FirstFirst ... 567

Similar Threads

  1. Titanium Road bike question
    By Buster65 in forum Bikes, Frames and Forks
    Replies: 30
    Last Post: 12-31-2015, 09:13 AM
  2. Best titanium road bike for under $4000.
    By Motomadman in forum Motobecane - Mercier
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 12-09-2014, 03:33 PM
  3. Best titanium road bike for under $4000.
    By Motomadman in forum Hot Deals
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 12-04-2014, 08:31 AM
  4. What wheels do you have on your titanium road bike?
    By sdlesko in forum Wheels and Tires
    Replies: 190
    Last Post: 08-31-2014, 12:12 AM
  5. My Very First Road Bike- Steel or Titanium
    By hrdkorsocerplyr in forum Bikes, Frames and Forks
    Replies: 45
    Last Post: 03-19-2013, 11:58 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •