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  1. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by CoffeeBean2 View Post
    Perhaps back in the 90's. I have a 2001 CAAD5 and 2007 CAAD9, and neither came with a CPSC sticker on them.
    https://www.cpsc.gov/content/cpsc-an...ection-program

  2. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by CoffeeBean2 View Post
    Perhaps back in the 90's. I have a 2001 CAAD5 and 2007 CAAD9, and neither came with a CPSC sticker on them.
    I have seen new ones, released in the last decade, with that sticker on them. Perhaps your shop is removing them?

    It looks much like the normal warning sticker seen on bikes, but instead of warning the user to wear a helmet and use a light at night (or not ride at night as posted on many department store bikes) it warns the user to regularly inspect the frame for cracks.
    Life is short... enjoy the ride.

  3. #53
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    It looks *just* like this (it's in the link I posted above).


  4. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by Migen21 View Post
    It looks *just* like this (it's in the link I posted above).

    Neither the link nor the photo work on my slow connection. Forgive my redundancy.
    Life is short... enjoy the ride.

  5. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by CoffeeBean2 View Post
    Perhaps back in the 90's. I have a 2001 CAAD5 and 2007 CAAD9, and neither came with a CPSC sticker on them.
    My 2009 Caad 9 has one. It's not identical to the one pictured but the gist of it is the same.. It's under the clear coat so wouldn't be removed.

  6. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by Migen21 View Post
    It looks *just* like this (it's in the link I posted above).

    No stickers like this on any of my 4 Cannondale bikes. They do have disclaimers similar to this in their instruction manuals including warnings that maneuvers like chucking, wheel drops, etc., are considered abuse and damage due to things like this are not covered. I don't know they can determine if this has been done.

    To be fair, Cannondale is generally not as much a stickler about warranty replacement as Trek who as of late seems to try and find any way out of a warranty claim. Cannondale realizes that a satisfied customer is more valuable than losing a comparatively little on a warranty claim.

    Disclaimer: I am not a shill for Cannondale. I have other bikes besides Cannondale - 1 Trek and 1 Novara. My next bike will also probably not be a Cannondale, not because I don't like Cannondale, but because they don't have the bike I am looking for.
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

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  7. #57
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    I have a Cannondale CAAD10 and a Cannondale Super Six Evo Hi-Mod. Both 2015 models with Dura Ace 9000 and Mavic Cosmic UIltimates. To tell you the truth, the difference is there, but subtle enough that the average person wouldn't notice. Reason? They have the identical geometry. Racing the two, I can't tell. Doing a century ride, I can tell that the Evo Hi-Mod has a little more comfort after about 60-70 miles. I would not even consider the non-Hi Mod carbon. Might as well save weight and get the same ride quality from the CAAD. My LBS agrees. I race crits and I would NEVER take the carbon. Crit racing isn't a matter of "If" but "when" you will crash. I've seen too many accidents where the riders on carbon bikes were out of the race due to broken frames, but the riders with aluminum ones usually were able to get back on and ride. We need both. Excellent riding aluminum bikes were made possible by using a lot of carbon bike technology and incorporating it into alloy frame design and engineering. they are still alloy but ride smoother. Go for a ride on the new Cannondale CAAD12, Trek Emonda AL, Jamis Icon, or the higher end Specialized Allez. Aluminum bikes that will make you a believer. I still love my carbon, but my CAAD10 is the bike I usually turn to for most rides. I love it!

  8. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rashadabd View Post
    Here's a few aluminum models that have impressed some folks:

    Trek Emonda ALR 6 review - Cycling Weekly

    Road Bike Action | First Ride: Specialized Allez DSW Sprint X2

    Cannondale CAAD12 105 review - BikeRadar USA

    Review: Giant Contend SL 1 | road.cc

    FIRST LOOK: Fuji's New Adventure Bike, 2017 Roubaix & Ultra Light SL 2.1 Disc - Bicycling Australia

    I guess the other side of the argument is that carbon bikes have never been more affordable. With some brands like Giant or Fuji, the price difference between a high end aluminum bike and a low to middle of the road carbon bike is so close that you might as well choose carbon. But is that assumption always accurate? Even with big brands, is the carbon bike always the best option today?

    I have to disagree somewhat. Usually you'll get similar ride qualities, but with the aluminum, it tends to have a slightly higher performance than those. Like I mentioned in another thread, take Cannondale for example. You can go with the CAAD12 you mentioned above or the SuperSix EVo Hi Mod or non Hi Mod. I own a Evo Hi- Mod and a CAAD10. Both are 2015 however, but the same applies to the newer models.

    The Evo Hi-Mod does have a slightly more compliant ride. It is subtle, but it's there. The non-Hi Mod Evo is in the same price range as the CAAD and feels identical. My take is: If you had the choice and didn't want to pay the premium for the Hi-Mod, go with the alloy. Why pay the same price for a carbon bike that rides identical, but is heavier? It's just buying carbon for the sake of riding carbon. My point is that the claims made on carbon apply to the high end carbon bikes, where they use more carbon fibers and resins. mid to low level will lack many of the qualities, which is expected. I would take high end aluminum over lower and mid level carbon. High end carbon, however will definitely win between the two materials. Would it be worth it for most riders? No.

  9. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    Cracknfail? Unless you regularly ride over cliffs and drop your bike from tall buildings, I doubt you'll crack your Cannondale aluminum frame.
    Cannondales claim was the frame was super stiff. You can place a CAAD frame on it's side and stand on the seatstay and it wouldn't bend or crack under the weight of a 200 lb guy.

  10. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    That's what I figured. But hey, that's more labor = extra cost. After Cannondale was bought by Dorel and production went to Taiwan, they stopped the nice smooth welds.
    I know my CAAD10 has smooth welds but they look halfazz compared to the CAAD 9. The US CAADs welds were so smooth, they were looked non existent.

  11. #61
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    This is what dictates my choice of a road bike frame:

    Affordable.
    Comfortable
    Fixable from crashes or accidents--and you will crash, tip over, or your bike will be abused by some situation where it falls over or is struck by something.

    It happens. Often when you least expect it.

    I get the above by buying a quality brand, (such as Trek that has a great warranty and is found worldwide), affordable aluminum frame 11 speed compact.

    Comfort for me as an individual comes in choosing the right frame geometry design for me, upgrading wheels and tires. (Good wheels and tires plus right frame are far more important that frame material IMO.

    Riding comfort is made easy by my environment. I ride almost exclusively along the California coast and coastal mountains. So I'm always riding on good roads and in good weather year round. I'm lucky. Help is also always close by.

    Ride with quality bibs that fit properly.

    Last but far from least is a truly good fit done by a genuine hardcore expert professional fitter. Nothing is more comfortable than getting fitted to the bike ESPECIALLY if you ride often, long and or hard.

    Everyone's needs, goals, opinions are individual so your's all may be quite different from mine.

  12. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by terbennett View Post
    I know my CAAD10 has smooth welds but they look halfazz compared to the CAAD 9. The US CAADs welds were so smooth, they were looked non existent.
    Thats because the US frames were sanded down to make the welds look smooth...
    All the gear and no idea

  13. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Strongbow View Post
    Yes.
    I didn't say they did. I just know what I like to ride on the road.
    I would never go Aluminum again for anything but a cheap commuter bike. Count me in the crowd that says the choice is either Carbon or Titanium. I'd say steel but I like the corrosion properties of Titanium which also weights slightly less and offers a similar ride profile.

    Aluminum makes sense for crit bikes where crashes are more likely and the bike may need to be replaced sooner rather than later. Plus the rides tend to be shorter so comfort is less of an issue than say an all day in the saddle century ride.

    You'd be hard pressed to convince me to replace my Firefly or Colnago with an aluminum bike regardless of cost savings.

  14. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by mik_git View Post
    Thats because the US frames were sanded down to make the welds look smooth...
    I understand that, but the welds on the 10 are sanded down too. they just aren't sanded down as much. I bet that has something to do with using less material in building the frame. After all the CAAD10 and 12s do have lighter frames.

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