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  1. #1
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    DI2 Wiring on Non Specific DI2 Frames

    Right up front I'd like to say when it comes to running cables/wires internally on frames I am an idiot and know very little. I've also never used or tried to install DI2 before, and when I read some other threads about custom DI2 wiring configurations I get lost pretty quickly.

    I'm looking to get either a Cannondale Evo or Tarmac SL3/SL4 frameset and then install DI2. From what I was told, and also read, the SL4s and Evo frames are "DI2 ready" (for SL3 only the Roubaix SL3 is being sold DI2 ready?), but after thinking about it some more I imagine that unless the frame is actually part of an entire DI2 bike system, the frames will not be ready right off the bat to run DI2 internally. Does this sound right? I'm just looking to purchase the frameset by itself, so it is unlikely I'll be purchasing a frame that happens to have been from a entire DI2 system. Without drilling holes, how much can the wires be concealed on these frames?

    I don't want the bike to look like a mess with wires and ugly zip ties visible all along the frame. Ideally if the frame has a lot of black I can hide some of the wiring more easily along the black sections. I found some pictures of some set ups with what seemed to be clear tape all along the tubes to hold the wires in place, but I don't know what type of tape was used or how good of an idea that is in the long run.

  2. #2
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    Most Specialized frames are Di2 ready. The Di2 wire goes in the same hole on the downtube as the rear derailleur cable. There is a hole on the front of the seat tube just above the bottom bracket shell for the front derailleur wire.
    Trek Madone frames are also easy to install Di2 on.
    I was in a shop today and they had Spec Venges and Tarmacs, Trek Madones, and a Cervelo S5 all with Di2.

    If you don't feel confident most shops can do the install. There is an easy how-to on the Park Tools site.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cinelli 82220 View Post
    The Di2 wire goes in the same hole on the downtube as the rear derailleur cable. There is a hole on the front of the seat tube just above the bottom bracket shell for the front derailleur wire.
    I see, so what is the main difference between a DI2 ready and non DI2 ready frame? I was told by a specialized rep most SL3 frames are not DI2 ready.

  4. #4
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    2012 Giant TCR Advanced SLs are are all Di2 ready as well and if i'm not mistaken so are the regular TCR Advanced frames.

  5. #5
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    Wink

    I did my own install of Ui2 on a 2012 Trek that had internal cable routing. Thus it was Ui2 ready. After reading the how to on the Shimano site and buying the Ui2 kit from Trek I felt confident in doing it myself. It works great and I love it. The external kit is even easier but you will have cable covers, zip ties, and leftover cable stops on certain frames. My Specialized Roubaix was Ui2 ready also with internal cable routing and grommets covering wire holes on the frame. Calfee will convert a non ready frame into a Ui2 frame for you.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cableguy View Post
    I see, so what is the main difference between a DI2 ready and non DI2 ready frame? I was told by a specialized rep most SL3 frames are not DI2 ready.
    The SL3 Di2 version was not very common. But most current Spec bikes are Di2 ready, just look for the black rubber plug above the bottom bracket on the seat tube.
    Definitely go for internal wiring over external, it looks better and the wires are protected inside the frame.

  7. #7
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    The difference between ready and not ready is two fold: first, any bike where the derailleur cables go inside the downtube can utilize an internal Di2 cable. From there to you go to frames that the rear derailleur goes inside the rear chain stay. Some of these internal cabling frames offer Di2 kits with small parts and grommets to work with Di2 cables. Trek 6 series Madones have this along with a kit that places the battery underneath the bottom bracket. Bikes that have exposed derailleur cabling require the use of an external cable that can be hidden with the black or white mounting tape but not as clean looking. Specialized SL3 Roubaixs and SL4 Tarmacs have the internal cabling and have kit available for Di2. The installation on Tarmac SL3 is external unless you are knowledgeable enough to drill your frame. As previously stated, the Park Tool Di2 instructions are excellent.

  8. #8
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    I ride an older non Di2 routed Trek Madone. Not one zip tie below the indicator box on the brake cable, and the only wire you can see is from the brake housing to the frame, and the rear dropout to the rear derailleur. Shimano makes some really nifty self adhesive strips to hide the wires with, and with a little planning, any bike should look great with Di2.

  9. #9
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    Isn't there an issue with the battery too? I thought it needs its own specific drilled holes so you can secure it to the frame using screws...

  10. #10
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    Here is an Ultegra Di2 installed internally, Dura-Ace is the same way.




  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by gordy748 View Post
    Isn't there an issue with the battery too? I thought it needs its own specific drilled holes so you can secure it to the frame using screws...
    There is a battery mount for non DI2 frames, basically the mount is screwed into the down tube's regular bottle cage holes, and then the bottle cage can be installed on top of it.

    Quote Originally Posted by 202cycle
    I ride an older non Di2 routed Trek Madone. Not one zip tie below the indicator box on the brake cable, and the only wire you can see is from the brake housing to the frame, and the rear dropout to the rear derailleur. Shimano makes some really nifty self adhesive strips to hide the wires with, and with a little planning, any bike should look great with Di2.
    This is the route I decided to go. I'm building up a Cannondale Evo and quite frankly getting a DI2 Evo frame by itself is extremely hard. I've looked at pictures of external wiring jobs and as you said it can look just as good as an internal setup.

  12. #12
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    DI2 Installation on Non Specific Di2 Frame

    Quote Originally Posted by Cableguy View Post
    There is a battery mount for non DI2 frames, basically the mount is screwed into the down tube's regular bottle cage holes, and then the bottle cage can be installed on top of it.



    This is the route I decided to go. I'm building up a Cannondale Evo and quite frankly getting a DI2 Evo frame by itself is extremely hard. I've looked at pictures of external wiring jobs and as you said it can look just as good as an internal setup.
    Can anyone post pictures and an EVO if possible of the Di2 setup? Is there a way to route wiring internally on a non-specific Di2 EVO frame?

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by droptopcar View Post
    Can anyone post pictures and an EVO if possible of the Di2 setup? Is there a way to route wiring internally on a non-specific Di2 EVO frame?
    I don't have pics of my Evo with external wiring right now that I can post, but it basically looks just like an internal wiring setup. There is very little visible difference.

    The biggest difference is instead of a wire going into the headtube and through the down tube, it traces underneath the downtube and is held in place with shimano wire covers. I'm posting a pic I found online that kind of shows this. I believe the covers come in black and white, so if the underside of your downtube is black or white that is ideal. The zip tie in the pic is mainly to keep the battery mount more stable, you could probably rig a stealthier solution, or if you really wanted skip it.

    Another wire is ran under the chainstay for external, but this one is just about undetectable as it's low and parallel to the ground... you'd have to lift the bike up or get on the ground to be able to see it.

    The only way to run a wire internally on a regular Evo frame, that I'm aware of, is to drill holes. You'll run into warranty and safety issues. Really not worth it, as if you do a good job with external wiring no one will notice the difference unless they're looking specifically for it.

    The main thing that can sort of stand out is if the shimano wire covers are a different color than the underside of the down tube... in which case from the front you can discern the covers on the underbelly when looking closely.


  14. #14
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    Tarmac SL3 is not Di2 ready, SL4 is. I think Roubaix SL3 is also Di2 Ready.
    I have a Tarmac SL3 and had tiny holes drilled in the frame to run the wires internal.
    Also made my own seatpost battery (hated the frame mounted battery).
    Took my frame to somebody who knows how to do the drilling.

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