View Poll Results: Domane or Emonda for me?

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  • Emonda

    2 11.76%
  • Domane

    15 88.24%
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  1. #1
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    Domane or Emonda... what do you choose in my case?

    Me - I am a 6í1Ē, 150lb rider and have been riding for about 3-4 years. I ride about 4500-5000mi/year. Strengths are longer climbs. Weaknesses are long hard rides and pacelining. I have some shoulder and back issues but have worked through them relatively well.

    My rides - generally I ride 1-2 hrs most days with some 2-5 hr rides thrown in ever week or couple of weeks. Rides average 100ft/mi of climbing, most of which is 2-7 minute fairly steep climbs. I chase local komís and prís on these kinds of climbs for fun. Road conditions are generally poor back roads with pot holes, cracks, etc.

    Plans - I plan to ride more fast group rides and continue chasing koms for fun. I have a cx/gravel bike and mtbís but my only roadie now is a 1998 Klein that is 2 sizes too big. I generally favor a slightly agressive position but nothing crazy.

    I have ninja status with trek so I am choosing between a domane and an emonda.... so what do you pick?

  2. #2
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    Two important questions for the survey:


    • How old are you?
    • How smooth are the roads where you live?


    If you're young (20's) and/or live in the south where the roads are relatively smooth because they don't have to endure the freeze/thaw cycles of the north, the Emonda might be the best choice as you don't have a high need for comfort.

    However, if you're a little older (late 30's or older) and/or the roads by you suck (like in the northern USA), the Domane might be the best choice as your body will thank you.

    I bought a Domane a few years back because my 40-something-year-old body started getting tired of the abuse it was taking on rough Wisconsin roads. While the Domane isn't exactly like riding on a pillow, it's considerably less harsh than previous bikes I own. It's stiff where it needs to be (in the bottom-bracket area), still quite light weight, AND *comfortable*, which makes the ideal bike for me.

    Heck, the Domane Disc could act as both your road and CX bike... just get second wheelset with off-road tires for CX riding.

    How do you get "ninja status" with Trek? I have a whole heard of Treks in my basement and they've never bestowed that honor on me

  3. #3
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    Thanks for the input!

    Ninja status comes with working at a trek shop and doing a large number of courses with them.

    I am 35

    Roads are crap (southern pa)

    I already have a cx bike to race cx and gravel. Gearing and weight are not condusive to hard group rides or climbing.

  4. #4
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    For harsh roads Iíd go for the Domane. But if you could stretch it go for a Madone. ISO decoupler and aero. All the bike you could ever need.


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  5. #5
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    I didnít look at the madone because, after working in a shop, I have no desire to service those. They are a bear to work on. I will happily service for customers but not my own bike.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by khardrunner14 View Post
    I didnít look at the madone because, after working in a shop, I have no desire to service those. They are a bear to work on. I will happily service for customers but not my own bike.
    Thatís fair enough but they are great to ride. Iíve had one for 18 months and bar changing the bottom bracket bearings it has needed no other maintenance.

    Iím sure you ridden one if youíre working in a Trek store but if not take one out for a long spin.


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  7. #7
    'brifter' is a lame word.
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    You work in a Trek shop but you're asking for advice here? I work in a Trek owned shop and I know exactly what my next road bike will be.

    The Madone isn't that hard to work on, especially if you're disc brake/Di2 or of course etap.
    I work for some bike racers
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    and a bunch of skateboards

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
    You work in a Trek shop but you're asking for advice here? I work in a Trek owned shop and I know exactly what my next road bike will be.

    The Madone isn't that hard to work on, especially if you're disc brake/Di2 or of course etap.
    Sorry let me clarify...

    I am a part time part timer in a small shop that does not carry a lot of the higher end models, especially not in my size. I do not and will not have a chance to ride prior to purchasing.

    Also, I will not be spending enough for di2 disc models.

    My experience has been cable routing is tough, especially with one piece bar/stem combos and the hidden direct mount brakes. I just prefer simple for my own bikes. I am not racing crits or any real road races. Just hitting some climbs hard and the occasional fast group ride.

    Thanks for encouraging me to look at a madone, they are pretty bikes. However I donít think at this point they are what I am looking for.

  9. #9
    'brifter' is a lame word.
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    Quote Originally Posted by khardrunner14 View Post
    Sorry let me clarify...

    I am a part time part timer in a small shop that does not carry a lot of the higher end models, especially not in my size. I do not and will not have a chance to ride prior to purchasing.

    Also, I will not be spending enough for di2 disc models.

    My experience has been cable routing is tough, especially with one piece bar/stem combos and the hidden direct mount brakes. I just prefer simple for my own bikes. I am not racing crits or any real road races. Just hitting some climbs hard and the occasional fast group ride.

    Thanks for encouraging me to look at a madone, they are pretty bikes. However I donít think at this point they are what I am looking for.
    Ok, not being able to try the bikes makes things a little harder. The Emonda is a little harsher riding than the Domane. According to the numbers the Emonda be a little quicker steering but I don't think the Domane is 'slow'. You can obviously get a little lower bar position w/ the Emonda but you can set a Domane up fairly low w/ -17 stem if you flip it. You can run 28mm tires on either bike. Given the road conditions you described in your area I'd buy the Domane. A guy that worked in our shop had a Madone for a year, then wanted to get an Emonda cuz it was 'lighter'. He rode it for 2 weeks then went back to the Madone. Iso Speed is pretty cool.
    I work for some bike racers
    I've got some bikes, some guns,
    and a bunch of skateboards

  10. #10
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    Thanks for the input. Itís one thing to know what trek and the numbers say, but real world application really helps to clarify the capabilities of the bikes. Thanks for that as well!

  11. #11
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    Hear me out for a second and let me know if this helps your situation.

    Me:
    -Almost 32
    -217lbs
    -6'1
    -Strong legs and can keep up with the little guys
    -I'm a Clydesdale because of my diet and affliction for beer.
    -Live in Central PA in valley (Appalachian on one side, Allegheny front on the other)

    I have two go-to roadies, one a 2017 Tarmac Di2 and the other a 2013 Domane 5.2 cable everything. For me, personally, the Domane is my main ride. Although it doesn't get up and go as quickly as the Tarmac, it certainly can hang in a group of pure performance bicycles. It's comfortable, stiff where it needs to be, compliant, and smooth.

    I've been tempted to take my HED Ardennes off of the Tarmac and put them on the Domane to see if that would help the "snappiness" of the Domane, but since I can still hang with the group during faster rides (avg. 18-19mph) being bone stock I haven't don it yet.

    The Emonda and Domane both have their purposes, but the Domane is a very very capable bicycle. Trek is a very prominent brand among cyclist in my area so I know a bunch of folks that have Emondas and Domanes. I have yet to see an Emonda dust a Domane on a climb. From my experience, take it for what it's worth, not much, your question has an easy answer - Domane.

    NOW, if I lived back in Oklahoma where I went to college, I would probably own an Emonda or Madone because with the wind you want to get as aero as possible for efficiency.

    Either route you choose, both are great bikes!

    *I do really like my Tarmac tho ;-P

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by TREKIN View Post
    Hear me out for a second and let me know if this helps your situation.

    Me:
    -Almost 32
    -217lbs
    -6'1
    -Strong legs and can keep up with the little guys
    -I'm a Clydesdale because of my diet and affliction for beer.
    -Live in Central PA in valley (Appalachian on one side, Allegheny front on the other)

    I have two go-to roadies, one a 2017 Tarmac Di2 and the other a 2013 Domane 5.2 cable everything. For me, personally, the Domane is my main ride. Although it doesn't get up and go as quickly as the Tarmac, it certainly can hang in a group of pure performance bicycles. It's comfortable, stiff where it needs to be, compliant, and smooth.

    I've been tempted to take my HED Ardennes off of the Tarmac and put them on the Domane to see if that would help the "snappiness" of the Domane, but since I can still hang with the group during faster rides (avg. 18-19mph) being bone stock I haven't don it yet.

    The Emonda and Domane both have their purposes, but the Domane is a very very capable bicycle. Trek is a very prominent brand among cyclist in my area so I know a bunch of folks that have Emondas and Domanes. I have yet to see an Emonda dust a Domane on a climb. From my experience, take it for what it's worth, not much, your question has an easy answer - Domane.

    NOW, if I lived back in Oklahoma where I went to college, I would probably own an Emonda or Madone because with the wind you want to get as aero as possible for efficiency.

    Either route you choose, both are great bikes!

    *I do really like my Tarmac tho ;-P
    Yep, helpful!

  13. #13
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    I have been riding for decades. What I have noticed about my Domane is that it softens the ride on tarmac roads to the point that i sometimes stop to check to see if my rear tire is going flat. You just don''t feel the road buzz you normally get on those roads.

  14. #14
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    FWIW, I ride a Domane SL5 and previously rode a Fuji SL before that (basically Fujiís Emonda/Climbing Bike). I would not trade my Domane for any level Emonda as of now, but I am 44, I ride a good bit of gravel and I face some serious climbing here in Colorado. The combination of those factors led me to the Domane but both are really good bikes.
    Every climb has its end, for verily with difficulty there is relief...

  15. #15
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    Every climb has its end, for verily with difficulty there is relief...

  16. #16
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    I certainly did not expect this to be so one sided, especially since climbing is my ďthingĒ. Right now I can grab a domane sl6 or emonda sl6 for $250ish in price difference. Decisions...

  17. #17
    flinty-eyed moderator
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    Domane SLR
    Dr. Cox: Lady, people aren't chocolates. Do you know what they are mostly? Bastards. Bastard-coated bastards with bastard fillings. But I don't find them half as annoying as I find naive bubble-headed optimists who walk around vomiting sunshine.

  18. #18
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    Trek really hit the nail on the head with the Domane. Prior to buying mine in 2013 when they first released, I did a lot of research and I believed advertisements. As a marketing professional, I knew I was risking the chance of drinking the coolaid and getting a bike that was a hoax. The Domane lives up to its name.
    Iím sure the newer models are even more smooth and compliant. I have a friend with a new Domane that has the front decoupler on the headtube and he praises it. I think the headshock on the new Roubaix is a bit much (two friends have those) and can make for too much fleet while out of the saddle.
    I have yet to hear a Domane owner say their bike sucks; I do hear a lot praise. My friends with …mondas have no complaints or praises over than they have a light bike. My Domane is a 58cm, bone stock, and with bottle cages and shimano pedals weighs 17.xxlbs so itís no heavyweight either.
    I saw trek has 2018 Domane full cable bikes on sale for $2,999 right now. At that price youíre getting a lot bike for the money. If Christmas wasnít around the corner I would buy one of them just to have haha.

  19. #19
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    Let's see. You say:

    *Shoulder and back issues
    *2-7 minute steep climbs
    *Poor back roads with pot holes, cracks, etc.

    That would point to the Domane.

    Then you say:

    *Favor a slightly aggressive position

    That would point to the Emonda.

    What is your riding position right now and do you have any shoulder or back pains with it?

    This all being said, I really would not buy either of these without test riding both. How can you not have the chance to test ride? Don't rush it.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

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  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    Let's see. You say:

    *Shoulder and back issues
    *2-7 minute steep climbs
    *Poor back roads with pot holes, cracks, etc.

    That would point to the Domane.

    Then you say:

    *Favor a slightly aggressive position

    That would point to the Emonda.

    What is your riding position right now and do you have any shoulder or back pains with it?

    This all being said, I really would not buy either of these without test riding both. How can you not have the chance to test ride? Don't rush it.
    I wish I had a chance to test ride, but even at the shop he never has a higher end bikes in my size. Just not in the cards here.

    Not sure how to describe my riding position. Even on my cross bike I have a few inches drop from saddle to the bars. Partly because I have really long legs, I find it necessary. I looked at the geo and should be able to make either work without going nuts.

  21. #21
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    For what it's worth, I test rode both bikes and ended up putting a deposit on the Domane. It is still a race bike and you can get fairly aggressive with your position. It doesn't handle quite as quickly as the Emonda, but I prefer the handling of the Domane. It isn't slow, but is predictable. I don't plan on racing criteriums again, so I don't need razor sharp steering. As for the weight of each bike, the Emonda is lighter, but not significantly so and with better wheels, you can knock off weight. You only weigh 150 lbs. anyway, so rider weight is the most significant part of the equation. The Domane, as has been stated, will be very comfortable on rough roads. On long rides, you will love it. Good luck.

  22. #22
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    I'm 45 and rode both of these two months ago. If I had to choose, I'd choose the Emonda. It fit my riding style and the ride differences weren't that different to me. There was some, but not much, but the Emonda felt better in the corners. Fitting on either wasn't an issue so it's just a matter of preference. I live in Southern California, so your experience could be different where you are.

  23. #23
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    Domane is on the way! Hope it gets here this week so I can get a ride this weekend!

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by khardrunner14 View Post
    Domane is on the way! Hope it gets here this week so I can get a ride this weekend!
    Enjoy! I just took delivery of mine today.
    Dr. Cox: Lady, people aren't chocolates. Do you know what they are mostly? Bastards. Bastard-coated bastards with bastard fillings. But I don't find them half as annoying as I find naive bubble-headed optimists who walk around vomiting sunshine.

  25. #25
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    Neither one.

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