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  1. #1
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    Fuji vs Trek vs Tomasso

    So I am relatively new to road biking and currently riding a junky Schwinn Phocus 1600 I purchased end of April 2018. For a bare bones entry level road bike priced at $330, i have no complaints. However, i obviously plan to upgrade in the near future but since i am new to this sport i feel somewhat hesitant about making a decision without some insider knowledge.

    A little background on my road biking. I am currently riding between 500 and 600 miles per month. Mostly 20-30 mile rides many times per week though i would like to decrease my overall frequency and increase the distance over fewer rides. I expect to have logged 2000 miles on my current bike by the first week in August.

    I will admit that i am incredibly conscious of my spending habits and finances even though i am comfortable. For this reason i do not plan on purchasing a new road bike until june of next year. I also want to prove to myself that i am committed. At that rate i expect to have approximately 7000 miles on my current bike so i will be more than ready for an upgrade.

    Now to get into the meat and potatoes. The budget i am proposing for this new bike will be between $900 and $1500, post tax and shipping if i decide to purchase online. I have been tirelessly searching bikes in this price range with good reviews. I have a list that i have continued to add to and remove from however, right now i have 8 bikes on the list. I will list them below in no particular order with the post tax price:

    Fuji Transonic 2.7 ($1498) - carbon frame
    Fuji Transonic 2.8 LE ($1498) - carbon frame
    Trek Emonda ALR 4 ($1230)
    Fuji SLR 3.2 ($1391) - carbon frame
    Fuji Roubaix 1.3 ($1284)
    Fuji Roubaix 1.1 ($1391)
    Fuji Roubaix 1.5 ($1070)
    Tomasso Ghisallo ($1177) - carbon frame

    Right off the bat, if anyone thinks one or more of these bikes should be removed, that would be great input. Also, if anyone sees one that they think is a must i would love to hear which one and why.

    The two i am looking at closest are the Trek and the Roubaix 1.1.

    The bikes in the list vary in groupsets from tiagra to 105 to some ultegra mixed in. They all have carbon forks and the ones noted above have carbon frames. I am not a stickler for an aluminum vs carbon frame as long as the material is quality.

    The Trek and Tomasso catch my eye because while they both have tiagra groupsets, compared to the others which vary from 105 to some ultegra, their groupsets are complete and there are no mix ins of other house name parts. The Fuji bike all have a lot of Oval products which i know is their house brand and i have read decent things but they do not seem to stack up against a complete shimano groupset.

    I am also ignoring specs on wheels and tires as i know stock bicycles never come with high quality of either. If i want to upgrade in the future i will.

    In regard to weight. All of the bikes, based on the stats i have found, weigh between 17.75 lbs and 20 lbs. I am 5'8" and weigh 163 lbs so i am not going to get any lighter. I figure from what i have read, these differences are fairly negligible for a new cyclist like myself.

    In terms of feedback i am mostly looking for some advice on what might be the better choice and also any suggestions for bikes i have not listed here.

    Thanks

  2. #2
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    If waiting till next year, why ask now ?

    Models will have changed in 10 mos.

    As well, do you feel comfortable ordering mail order ?. You really, really need to know what fits as well as be comfortable with a moderate level of mechanical work to go the mail order. With this level of trade up, you might do well at a local shop that runs a fall sale.

    That said, if I had a choice between those three, the Tomasso is at the bottoms of the list. I’ve owned 2, they are decent frames, but typically cut corners on some components, wheels being the example,

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve B. View Post
    As well, do you feel comfortable ordering mail order ?. You really, really need to know what fits as well as be comfortable with a moderate level of mechanical work to go the mail order. With this level of trade up, you might do well at a local shop that runs a fall sale.
    ^This.^

    I really would not buy a bike on the internet that you will be logging high miles on. There is nothing more important that getting a proper fit at a good reputable bike shop. A good shop will put you and your new bike on their trainer, watch you pedal and make adjustments to dial in your fit just right.

    To comment on some items in your post, I agree that I would prefer a complete group set. Yes, many brands throw in a cheaper crank set like an Oval or FSA since that is a high cost item. Overall, I think Shimano 105 is the sweet spot for quality and value.

    Don't be focused one or two brands of bikes. There are many good brands out there. Make sure you get your correct frame size and a complete fitting with your purchase. A bike that fits you properly will be more enjoyable to ride and may prevent repetitive use injury down the road. Go to different shops, test ride bikes. Buy the one that feels best to you and the one that fits you best.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  4. #4
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    Awesome answers here, and since you live here in so Cal, I would recommend going to actually Performance Bike shops if you decide on a Fuji. Fuji now owns Performance and there are many locations here. The plus side to Performance is that you can order the bike to the store. There are also lots of Trek shops here too. LA, Orange, and San Diego Counties have everything you need. Try out different brands. there are lots of them out there and it's hard to find a shoddy bike in an respectable bike shop these days...even at the low end. Of course, these aren't low end bikes. 105 is a great group to have and I endorse it all of the time. However, Tiagra is good too and will satisfy most riders. You'll have one less gear (10 speed vs. 105's 11 speed), and will likely move to 11 in a couple of years or so, but the stuff is stout, works really well, and replacement parts are less expensive, if you ever need them. I owned a Tiagra bike once and was really impressed by how well it shifted and how long it lasted, contrary to what many say. If tuned correctly, it shifts superbly. So, 105 would be recommended, but don't hate yourself if you want a bike with Tiagra. It's good stuff too.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by terbennett View Post
    Awesome answers here, and since you live here in so Cal, I would recommend going to actually Performance Bike shops if you decide on a Fuji. Fuji now owns Performance and there are many locations here. The plus side to Performance is that you can order the bike to the store. There are also lots of Trek shops here too. LA, Orange, and San Diego Counties have everything you need. Try out different brands. there are lots of them out there and it's hard to find a shoddy bike in an respectable bike shop these days...even at the low end. Of course, these aren't low end bikes. 105 is a great group to have and I endorse it all of the time. However, Tiagra is good too and will satisfy most riders. You'll have one less gear (10 speed vs. 105's 11 speed), and will likely move to 11 in a couple of years or so, but the stuff is stout, works really well, and replacement parts are less expensive, if you ever need them. I owned a Tiagra bike once and was really impressed by how well it shifted and how long it lasted, contrary to what many say. If tuned correctly, it shifts superbly. So, 105 would be recommended, but don't hate yourself if you want a bike with Tiagra. It's good stuff too.
    Performance often offers triple points for their buyer's club-a $1500 bike would give you $450 in store credit to buy gear you'll need like helmet, pedals, shoes, clothing, etc.

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