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  1. #1
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    Giant Anyroad...

    I ran across a few of these at my LBS the other day; I really like these guys! I can't find a ton of information about them. Has anyone got any pros/cons with these? I might be getting one very soon!
    Thanks

  2. #2
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    32mm tires seem a bit skinny for a "gravel bike".
    "L'enfer, c'est les autres"

  3. #3
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    This will see 98% road trips. I'd just like to be able to have the option...

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    Never rode one, so you might want to dismiss this post before you get embroiled.

    I looked at this bike and found it interesting ... a much more relaxed (upright) riding position, tough enough to handle gravel and trails, .... but heavy. Everyone who owned one, even the people who liked them, mentioned the weight.

    I ended up getting a Fuji Sportif which weighs the same, for a third the cash ... and it Is heavy. I think that a nice light wheelset will make it work on the road ... but try finding nice, light disc wheelsets for cheap.

    I think for primarily a road bike its qualities would be wasted. To me the Anyroad is a dirt-trail, packed-earth bike... lower gearing, less aero position, toughness instead of lightness.

    I think a person willing to spend $40 on a stem and some spacers (and maybe $30 more for some of those “riser” drop bars) could get the same riding position on any bike .... get a bike with endurance geometry to start with, and adjust as needed.

    Unless you like taking two-foot drops onto rocks, I’d say most bikes can handle most double-track trails. Unless you plan to ride MTB courses, ay bike should be tough enough for Some off-road miles .... but you don’t want to haul a ton of heavy and unnecessary stiffness around with you on the nine-out-of-ten road rides.

    On the other hand .... the bike has a definite appeal. if it calls out to you, consider it. Try it. it mgiht be exactly what you need.

    Before I bought the Sportif I looked at the Fuji Yari, a ‘dedicated gravel bike” more like the Anyroad. I realized immediately that I would want a second set of wheels from day one .... and that I would be cursing the added pounds on every hill (except off-road.) But usually I ride my MTB off-road .... for that one-in-ten gravel ride, the nine road rides would be less fun.

    But as they say ... your mileage is guaranteed to vary.

    Look at the weight, look at the wheelset, look for more online reviews .... and if the bike sings to you, buy it and forget everything everyone else said.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Birdley123 View Post
    This will see 98% road trips. I'd just like to be able to have the option...
    Having the option is very likely to lead to frequently using the option. Riding dirt roads and trails is great.
    I'd say either do it right and get something that takes bigger than 32 (unless you're sure the gravel and trails are such you wouldn't use them) or don't bother with 2% or spending any money on it.
    Given that CX tires are 33 thus there are a ton of great 33 tires to choose from, limiting a bike at 32 does seem a bit weird.

  6. #6
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    I took a ride yesterday on my town/gravel frankenbike (Panasonic Tange 1000 touring frame, bullhorn bars, etc) down several rail/interurban/canal trails near my house. All were more or less 'singletrack', ranging from improved gravel, to packed dirt, to pavement. I'm riding 38mm Specialized Nimbus tires (nearly smooth pavement tread), and especially on the deeper gravel, I thought the 38 tires were a bit on the skinny side for the conditions. Having a smooth tread made the ride quick and easy on the pavement sections.
    "L'enfer, c'est les autres"

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    I agree with others. You have a lot of options in this price range that provide you with greater versatility and which would still be as good or better on the road. The Fuji Jari, Specialized Diverge, Diamondback Haanjo, Ridley X-Trail, and GT Grade are a few that come to mind. There are also a number of cyclocross bikes that now offer wider tire clearance that are interesting and could be a god fit for you like the updated Trek Boone/Crockett, Specialized Crux, Giant TCX SX, etc.
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  8. #8
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    32mm tires are indeed narrow for a gravel bike. But tires can be easily replaced. What can't be changed is tire clearance. So if you ever think you may want to run wider tires, make sure their is enough fork and stay clearance.

    There are now many options in the ever growing gravel/adventure bike field, so don't limit your options. All those mentioned above are worth a look as well as the Jamis Renegade series. They come with 36mm tires, but have enough clearance for 40mm tires. I now own one and I can tell you it is NOT slow on the road!
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    32mm tires are indeed narrow for a gravel bike. But tires can be easily replaced. What can't be changed is tire clearance. So if you ever think you may want to run wider tires, make sure their is enough fork and stay clearance.

    oh, I took the initial comment from No Time Toulouse to mean 32 is the max the frame will accept. If it's just that it 'comes with' 32 then that's not a problem at all. It's as good a guess as any for a company to offer as the stock option it comes with.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    ....They come with 36mm tires, but have enough clearance for 40mm tires. I now own one and I can tell you it is NOT slow on the road!
    I've found that wider tires are quicker over the worst broken pavement, and I tend to corner even a bit more extreme when I know that my wider tires will likely grip more, as well as not bounce-out from underneath. Skinny tires really only have an advantage on straight, smooth roads.
    "L'enfer, c'est les autres"

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by No Time Toulouse View Post
    I've found that wider tires are quicker over the worst broken pavement, and I tend to corner even a bit more extreme when I know that my wider tires will likely grip more, as well as not bounce-out from underneath. Skinny tires really only have an advantage on straight, smooth roads.
    When my existing tires wear out, I may try 40mm tires. Right now, I'm thrilled with the bike as it is with its 36mm tires. Broken pavement is a fact of life in my area, and it handles that quite well. But 40's could indeed be better.
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

    "Beware of geeks bearing formulas."
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    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



  12. #12
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    The Giant Any Road frame is supposed to take up to 42mm tires so that doesn't seem to be a limiter for gravel riding - Although I do agree the stock 32's aren't going to handle rougher gravel well.
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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Srode View Post
    The Giant Any Road frame is supposed to take up to 42mm tires so that doesn't seem to be a limiter for gravel riding - Although I do agree the stock 32's aren't going to handle rougher gravel well.
    I agree. But for someone who rides on asphalt mostly but wants to be able to pop off on to gravel now and then it's a pretty good compromise.
    That's a good 'jack of all trades master of none', so to speak size, size I think. I weight 145 and 33mm seems about right for mixed surface.

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