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  1. #1
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    Giant Anyroad Advanced 1

    Happy New Year everyone! This is the year I buy a new bike- I have a 2008 Jamis Satellite steel bike but my 56yo body needs something more upright. I ride mostly road, with the occasional foray, but nothing tricky or fancy; I like the adventure concept. I tried (and loved) the Jamis Renegade Elite but the price point may be- is- out of my range.

    The Giant Anyroad Advanced 1 seems to be a similar, more affordable option, but I can't seem to find any reviews on it. I find Anyroad reviews, but the Advanced looks to be full carbon (and new for 2018). I like what I'm hearing about the Canyon bikes, but I live in Canada so that purchase would be at a distance (no dealers here).

    I'd appreciate any suggestions or advice, especially related to the Anyroad! Thanks in advance..

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    Quote Originally Posted by hopstiguy View Post
    Happy New Year everyone! This is the year I buy a new bike- I have a 2008 Jamis Satellite steel bike but my 56yo body needs something more upright. I ride mostly road, with the occasional foray, but nothing tricky or fancy; I like the adventure concept. I tried (and loved) the Jamis Renegade Elite but the price point may be- is- out of my range.

    The Giant Anyroad Advanced 1 seems to be a similar, more affordable option, but I can't seem to find any reviews on it. I find Anyroad reviews, but the Advanced looks to be full carbon (and new for 2018). I like what I'm hearing about the Canyon bikes, but I live in Canada so that purchase would be at a distance (no dealers here).

    I'd appreciate any suggestions or advice, especially related to the Anyroad! Thanks in advance..
    I would go for the Jamis Renegade Exploit. Around $2,200 USD, so not too hard on the wallet. It is 631 Reynolds Cro-Mo and I can tell you, while it may be 23lbs., it is NOT slow! Comfort heaven! Disclaimer: I own one and love it! I am soooo over carbon. Also, after owning a bikes with both 105 5800 and Ultegra 6800, I can tell you that I cannot tell the difference in shifting performance. They both shift flawlessly.

    Giant seems to have a few options - Anyroad, Toughroad, and Revolt. It seems Giant is betting the apple cart on gravel/adventure bikes, which might not be a bad thing.

    If you are looking to get the most upright position posible, the GT Grade is it. The only downside is only has room for 35mm tires, rather than the 40mm tires the Jamis can take. GT Cycles is owned by Canadian conglomerate Dorel Industries, so you shouldn't have any problem finding one of these.

    Best thing to do is test ride as many bikes as possible. Buy the one that fits you best and that you like best.
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

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  3. #3
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    Not a geometry expert but it looks like essentially a hybrid with drop bars. Not saying that's good, bad or indifferent but just make sure the fit works for you.

    That's a seriously compact frame so make sure you can safely set the saddle height where you want. Also, perhaps of minor concern, but the rear water bottle will likely be a real pain to use especially if you get one of the smaller sizes. A side entry water bottle cage helps with that though.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Strongbow View Post
    Not a geometry expert but it looks like essentially a hybrid with drop bars.
    Not really. More like an endurance road bike with room for wider tires. Gravel bikes are considerably lighter than most hybrids.
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

    "Beware of geeks bearing formulas."
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    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    Not really. More like an endurance road bike with room for wider tires. Gravel bikes are considerably lighter than most hybrids.
    It has nothing to do with weight. I'm talking about geometry. It looks just like a hybrid to me.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Strongbow View Post
    It has nothing to do with weight. I'm talking about geometry. It looks just like a hybrid to me.
    How do you figure? Are you saying this about this gravel bike, or about gravel bikes in general?
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

    "Beware of geeks bearing formulas."
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    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    How do you figure? Are you saying this about this gravel bike, or about gravel bikes in general?
    I have no idea what could have led you to think I was talking about gravel bikes in general.

    This bike looks like it would be virtually impossible to have any saddle to bar drop and riding in a somewhat upright, or totally upright, position is the only option. On a bike that takes big or small tires and doesn't have a shock(s) I call that hybrid.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Strongbow View Post
    I have no idea what could have led you to think I was talking about gravel bikes in general.

    This bike looks like it would be virtually impossible to have any saddle to bar drop and riding in a somewhat upright, or totally upright, position is the only option. On a bike that takes big or small tires and doesn't have a shock(s) I call that hybrid.

    Just because a bike does not have any saddle to bar drop does not make it a hybrid. Your definition of a hybrid is incorrect. It does not matter that you call it that.

    Also, in case you didn't know, some hybrids do have a shock.
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

    "Beware of geeks bearing formulas."
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    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    Just because a bike does not have any saddle to bar drop does not make it a hybrid. Your definition of a hybrid is incorrect. It does not matter that you call it that.

    Also, in case you didn't know, some hybrids do have a shock.
    Maybe try googling "hybrid bike geometry", Obviously you don't get my point but it's pretty simple.

    The fact is that bike, by appearance, had the geometry typical of a hybrid. I don't kow why you're all hung up on such a simple statement.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Strongbow View Post
    Maybe try googling "hybrid bike geometry", Obviously you don't get my point but it's pretty simple.

    The fact is that bike, by appearance, had the geometry typical of a hybrid. I don't kow why you're all hung up on such a simple statement.
    Because you are wrong on multiple levels on your definition of a hybrid bike. Let's go back and re-read your "definition" of a hybrid bike:

    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Strongbow View Post
    This bike looks like it would be virtually impossible to have any saddle to bar drop and riding in a somewhat upright, or totally upright, position is the only option. On a bike that takes big or small tires and doesn't have a shock(s) I call that hybrid.
    Newsflash: Gravel/adventure bikes have a more upright relaxed geometry. If they didn't, they would be cyclocross bikes. Also, there are differences in the ratio of stack to reach amoung hybrid bikes. Here is a hybrid which has the saddle and bars virtually level:

    Quick 4 | Cannondale Bicycles

    And here is a hybrid which is considerably more upright:

    Adventure 1 | Cannondale Bicycles

    Also, please note that the hybrid in the second link has a suspension, which plenty of hybrids do. That makes the second part of your "definition" false.
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

    "Beware of geeks bearing formulas."
    -- Warren Buffett

    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    Because you are wrong on multiple levels on your definition of a hybrid bike. Let's go back and re-read your "definition" of a hybrid bike:



    Newsflash: Gravel/adventure bikes have a more upright relaxed geometry. If they didn't, they would be cyclocross bikes. Also, there are differences in the ratio of stack to reach amoung hybrid bikes. Here is a hybrid which has the saddle and bars virtually level:

    Quick 4 | Cannondale Bicycles

    And here is a hybrid which is considerably more upright:

    Adventure 1 | Cannondale Bicycles

    Also, please note that the hybrid in the second link has a suspension, which plenty of hybrids do. That makes the second part of your "definition" false.
    Has he word hybrid touch a nerve? Are you just being pedantic? You're really over reacting to a simple statement that a bike appears to have the same geometry as a hybrid. Who cares. It looks like a hybrid with road bars to me. Deal with it.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Strongbow View Post
    Has he word hybrid touch a nerve? Are you just being pedantic? You're really over reacting to a simple statement that a bike appears to have the same geometry as a hybrid. Who cares. It looks like a hybrid with road bars to me. Deal with it.
    No nerves are touched here. I just find what you are saying silly. I'm not the one overreacting, dude.
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

    "Beware of geeks bearing formulas."
    -- Warren Buffett

    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by hopstiguy View Post
    Happy New Year everyone! This is the year I buy a new bike- I have a 2008 Jamis Satellite steel bike but my 56yo body needs something more upright. I ride mostly road, with the occasional foray, but nothing tricky or fancy; I like the adventure concept. I tried (and loved) the Jamis Renegade Elite but the price point may be- is- out of my range.

    The Giant Anyroad Advanced 1 seems to be a similar, more affordable option, but I can't seem to find any reviews on it. I find Anyroad reviews, but the Advanced looks to be full carbon (and new for 2018). I like what I'm hearing about the Canyon bikes, but I live in Canada so that purchase would be at a distance (no dealers here).

    I'd appreciate any suggestions or advice, especially related to the Anyroad! Thanks in advance..
    To answer your question a bit better. I have the Anyroad Comax (which is a lesser carbon version that this no longer offered). I personally love the bike and rode a little over 2,000 miles on it in 2017. A bit more upright which has allowed me to bike without shoulder pain. I use it for mostly road, longer rides, with some gravel (with 35s on the rims). The carbon sucks up a great deal of vibration relative to my older aluminum bike. The 105's are solid, especially with the 11 gears on back. I suspect the advanced will ride similarly to the Comax, possibly a bit lighter.

    I eventually upgraded the brakes to the HYRD ones and also bought new rims as the stock ones are a bit heavy. Let me know if you have any other questions.
    Last edited by dkeane123; 1 Week Ago at 07:11 AM.

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    hahaha you guys are too much.

    It looks like a drop-bar hybrid to me. Designed to fit an upright seating position and favor a somewhat 'non-dynamic' riding style. That's ok! It's a really good option for someone who just wants to go ride at a leisurely-quick pace for 50 miles. I bet that bike disappears under an enthusiastic casual cyclist.

    I like the trp spyres and 105 kit. Good stuff. I also like the higher offset fork, through axles, 105 cassette, and high volume tubeless tires.

    I'm ambivalent about the carbon frame. Carbon is cool, but it's the icing on the cake and this is bread'n'butter.

    I dislike the press-fit BB (although it's probably fine here), mechanical disk brakes in general, no 1:1 low gear (and no easy way to get it!), and unremarkable wheels. I also think that the upright posture is just a shortcut for a good fit, assuming decent fitness. That's a snob opinion, though.




    I'd endorse the purchase. Cool bike. If it were me i would happily trade away the carbon frame for hydro disks (or rim brakes, unless you're >200lbs and live in the mountains), or cost savings.

    The renegade exploit is MUCH more appealing to me, but i can't promise that you'd like it more. The exploit is a bike nerd's n+1 fantasy.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bubble View Post
    hahaha you guys are too much.

    It looks like a drop-bar hybrid to me. Designed to fit an upright seating position and favor a somewhat 'non-dynamic' riding style. That's ok! It's a really good option for someone who just wants to go ride at a leisurely-quick pace for 50 miles. I bet that bike disappears under an enthusiastic casual cyclist.

    I like the trp spyres and 105 kit. Good stuff. I also like the higher offset fork, through axles, 105 cassette, and high volume tubeless tires.

    I'm ambivalent about the carbon frame. Carbon is cool, but it's the icing on the cake and this is bread'n'butter.

    I dislike the press-fit BB (although it's probably fine here), mechanical disk brakes in general, no 1:1 low gear (and no easy way to get it!), and unremarkable wheels. I also think that the upright posture is just a shortcut for a good fit, assuming decent fitness. That's a snob opinion, though.




    I'd endorse the purchase. Cool bike. If it were me i would happily trade away the carbon frame for hydro disks (or rim brakes, unless you're >200lbs and live in the mountains), or cost savings.

    The renegade exploit is MUCH more appealing to me, but i can't promise that you'd like it more. The exploit is a bike nerd's n+1 fantasy.
    I live in hilly NH (not necessarily the mountains) and am about 200 lbs. The carbon on roads beat up by winter is night and day. I always wish I had one more lower gear...

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    Quote Originally Posted by bubble View Post
    I dislike the press-fit BB (although it's probably fine here), mechanical disk brakes in general,
    Agreed. Nothing wrong with good old Hollowtech II, and much easier to service. If I am going to get disc brakes, I want hydraulic.

    Quote Originally Posted by bubble View Post
    ..... no 1:1 low gear (and no easy way to get it!)
    34/50 with 11-32T is close enough and will get you up just about any hill. If you want a 34T cog, you can get a Wolf Tooth, though you are then testing the limits of your RD.

    Quote Originally Posted by bubble View Post
    .......and unremarkable wheels.
    Most bikes in this price range come with "unremarkable wheels".

    Quote Originally Posted by bubble View Post
    I also think that the upright posture is just a shortcut for a good fit, assuming decent fitness.
    Most gravel/adventure bikes have an upright position. This one a little more so. That curved top tube draws attention to it to make it look even more so.

    Quote Originally Posted by bubble View Post
    That's a snob opinion, though.
    You said it, not I.

    Quote Originally Posted by bubble View Post
    If it were me i would happily trade away the carbon frame for hydro disks.
    Agreed.

    Quote Originally Posted by bubble View Post
    The renegade exploit is MUCH more appealing to me, but i can't promise that you'd like it more. The exploit is a bike nerd's n+1 fantasy.
    This bike nerd's n+1 fantasy is reality. I own one and highly recommend it!
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

    "Beware of geeks bearing formulas."
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    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



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    Quote Originally Posted by dkeane123 View Post
    I live in hilly NH (not necessarily the mountains) and am about 200 lbs. The carbon on roads beat up by winter is night and day. I always wish I had one more lower gear...
    I don't doubt that whatever carbon bike you're referring to is night and day from whatever not carbon bikes you're comparing it to......but it's not because of what they are made of.

    I went from a carbon pure racing frame to more all-round riding design Ti and Steel (two separate frames, not a ti/steel single frame) and that was night and day also with the carbon one being by far the least comfortable. Which is no surprise because it's claim to fame is being super stiff and designed for sprinters.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Strongbow View Post
    I don't doubt that whatever carbon bike you're referring to is night and day from whatever not carbon bikes you're comparing it to......but it's not because of what they are made of.

    I went from a carbon pure racing frame to more all-round riding design Ti and Steel (two separate frames, not a ti/steel single frame) and that was night and day also with the carbon one being by far the least comfortable. Which is no surprise because it's claim to fame is being super stiff and designed for sprinters.
    It was an aluminum frame to the Giant Anyroad Comax. Agreed, geometry and construction method can make more of a difference.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bubble View Post
    hahaha you guys are too much.
    If it were me i would happily trade away the carbon frame for hydro disks
    Could you explain more why you do not like mechanical disc brake? What is the problem or downside exactly? I have a Giant Sedona that uses rim brakes. I also have Toughroad that uses hydro brakes. Both are cheaper than Anyroad. I guess there must be a reason for Giant to choose a mechanical disc brake to fit onto Anyroad.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MonteN View Post
    Could you explain more why you do not like mechanical disc brake? What is the problem or downside exactly? I have a Giant Sedona that uses rim brakes. I also have Toughroad that uses hydro brakes. Both are cheaper than Anyroad. I guess there must be a reason for Giant to choose a mechanical disc brake to fit onto Anyroad.
    Mech brakes are just fine with a few caveats. They occasionally require adjustment of gap between the pads. Usually there is a small dial on the brake that requires adjustment once a month or so (depending on how often you ride). No biggie. Also, hydro brakes have better feel (modulation for bike nerds) and stopping power. I liked the mechanical brakes that came with the Comax version, but eventually decided to upgrade to the TRP HY/RD - mostly because I don't mind riding in the rain and I didn't want to have to adjust the pads mid-ride.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MonteN View Post
    Could you explain more why you do not like mechanical disc brake? What is the problem or downside exactly?
    They're fussy. You get all the hassle of advancing pads and dealing with shift housings, combined with the really tight tolerances inherent in disks. Since you have to adjust them yourself, you regularly have to interact with that tolerance, not just when you drop your gym bag on the rotor and tweak it.

    The feel is crappy. The brakes will respond differently depending on how the caliper is aligned, you're still using compressible housings, and the stiff pads feel vague.

    Overall i'd rather have rim brakes unless i was riding in the rain or a >200lb mountain climber. Mech -> hydro is an impressive improvement; not the marginal gains one gets from quality alu -> carbon frame.




    I think mechanical disk on road bike was a stopgap measure while the S's brought hydro to the road market. You don't find mechanical disks on mtbs (or pretty much anything with brakes) and you won't find them on road in a few years.

    Quote Originally Posted by MonteN View Post
    I guess there must be a reason for Giant to choose a mechanical disc brake to fit onto Anyroad.
    Hydro integrated shifters are expensive. They're new, and they know you don't want anything else. Cha-ching.
    Last edited by bubble; 1 Day Ago at 09:41 AM.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by bubble View Post
    They're fussy. You get all the hassle of advancing pads and dealing with shift housings, combined with the really tight tolerances inherent in disks. Since you have to adjust them yourself, you regularly have to interact with that tolerance, not just when you drop your gym bag on the rotor and tweak it.

    The feel is crappy. The brakes will respond differently depending on how the caliper is aligned, you're still using compressible housings, and the stiff pads feel vague.
    This. My choices would be in the order of:

    Hydraulic disc brakes
    Rim brakes
    Mechanical disc brakes.
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