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  1. #1
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Going to Build My First Road Bike!

    Life is pretty good and I find myself in a good position. I have built up what I desire for biking on the mountain (DH; FS; and a Gravel). I'm really enjoying the road and I see it as a great way to get my cardio in without a DAMN treadmill.

    I want to build a road bike. I scoured all of the internets (ha) and I decided to go with a Kish Ti road frame. Sorry to the purist on the forum; the mtb in me requires disc!

    On the fence about groupset. If I go mechanical I will go Dura Ace. If I go electronic I will go SRAM Red E-Tap. I am leaning electronic. Brakeset will be what comes with the group but rotors will be 160mm (I'm a little nutty).

    Headset probably will be Chris King. Could always be Cane Creek or Hope though.

    Haven't got much thought into seat or seatpost. That can wait.

    I could use some help with drop bars. I have IsoCore on my only road bike (Domane SLR) it's comfortable but I don't like the flex. It flexes when I hit a good climb and I'm grabbing the hoods.

    I will probably go with a Ti stem. Seems to make sense for this build.

    Thanks in advance for the comments and advice.

  2. #2
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    Reputation: No Time Toulouse's Avatar
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    Well, Dura-Ace costs a lot and is really pretty fragile. Unless you plan to race, I'd stick with Ultegra or 105.
    I'm upping my standards;
    Up yours!

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by No Time Toulouse View Post
    Well, Dura-Ace costs a lot and is really pretty fragile. Unless you plan to race, I'd stick with Ultegra or 105.
    I think you missed the part about the OP saying "life is pretty good." That calls for high-end, baby! I disagree with you saying DA is fragile. Well over 100,000 miles for me on DA and only replaced worn items. Never broke a single thing. Some of us like the best, no matter what the price.

  4. #4
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    I can't imagine that anyone who has used Dura Ace components saying that are fragile.

    There are a lot of words I could use to describe Dura Ace. Most of them are good, and none of them are "Fragile".

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  5. #5
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    Dura Ace: I've read probably as much as you can find on Dura Ace from a few # designations ago (which it seems anyone who had one says "cats meow") to the newest iteration. Besides "ugly" the only suspect part claimed has been the cassette. Most recommend burning it out and getting an Ultegra.

    In reading my original post I neglected a pretty important request for help! Fork!! I can sling some paragraphs on a Fox 34 or 36 and Rock Shox Pike and get into tokens and sag BUT the plain old carbon road fork...I am sad to say know ZERO about. About all I know is it must be able to accept 32 tires; be disc; and look kewl!!

    Please take me to school on road forks. I'm thinking comfort here...The only person I race is ME.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Migen21 View Post
    I can't imagine that anyone who has used Dura Ace components saying that are fragile.
    I have no idea where No-Time came up with that one. The only part of a Dura-Ace groupo that could be labeled as "fragile" might be the cassette because the cogs are Ti which is softer and wears faster than typical steel cogs. No to mention "fragile" would be the wrong word.

    Dura-Ace is a great group set aside from the cassette. Expensive, but you can probably get a great deal on 9000 right now since 9100 came out. Besides I think 9000 looks nicer too.

    I think Ultegra 6800 is still your best bang for the buck. But if you're flush, by all means go for the 9000.
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

    "Beware of geeks bearing formulas."
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    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



  7. #7
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    My thoughts have been drifting back to Ti today as well. I found out that Litespeed has released some more affordable Ti frames that start around $1499. We have a great Litespeed dealer here too. Still looking and thinking. I like the new Emonda SL frame, but I like the idea of Ti frame a lot more I think. Outside of aerodynamics, I am having a hard time seeing why I wouldn't go this route for my next upgrade to be honest. Leaning heavily in this direction and looking forward to seeing your build. If I am missing something fellas/ladies, please correct me, but I really can't see much of a downside to Ti for road for the group ride, gran fondo, solo rider. I might look at again for gravel as well even though I really like the new Specialized Diverge.

    Budget Friendly:

    https://shop.litespeed.com/collectio...7-litespeed-t6

    https://shop.litespeed.com/collectio...7-litespeed-t5

    The Sweet Spot IMO:

    https://shop.litespeed.com/collectio...6-litespeed-t3

    https://shop.litespeed.com/collectio...7-litespeed-t2

    https://shop.litespeed.com/collectio...espeed-t5-disc

    https://www.bikerumor.com/2016/08/09...titanium-ride/

    https://www.bikerumor.com/2017/03/21...awesome-rides/

    The Dream:

    https://shop.litespeed.com/collectio...litespeed-t1sl

    https://shop.litespeed.com/collectio...peed-t1sl-disc

    2016 Buyer's Guide: Litespeed T1sl | Bicycling
    Last edited by Rashadabd; 2 Weeks Ago at 10:39 AM.
    Every climb has its end, for verily with difficulty there is relief...

  8. #8
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    Kish is specing Enve forks, would seem a safe solution. This build begs Super Record! For handlebar I actually prefer aluminum FSA compact with the flattened top section, believe it is now called Energy.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    I have no idea where No-Time came up with that one. The only part of a Dura-Ace groupo that could be labeled as "fragile" might be the cassette because the cogs are Ti which is softer and wears faster than typical steel cogs. No to mention "fragile" would be the wrong word.
    ...

    I think Ultegra 6800 is still your best bang for the buck. But if you're flush, by all means go for the 9000.
    Well, about 20 years ago, I spent pretty substantial money for a D/A crankset group (to match a set of D/A derailleurs), and before the first summer was over, I snapped the crank spindle.

    Still, it's nice to see that we both agree that Ultegra is a better deal. It seems that about 1/2 of the time Dura Ace is bought mostly for the "doosh factor" than any other reason. Unless you are actually racing at a fairly high level, all Dura Ace is going to do is relieve you of about an extra $500.......
    I'm upping my standards;
    Up yours!

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by No Time Toulouse View Post
    Well, about 20 years ago, I spent pretty substantial money for a D/A crankset group (to match a set of D/A derailleurs), and before the first summer was over, I snapped the crank spindle.

    Still, it's nice to see that we both agree that Ultegra is a better deal. It seems that about 1/2 of the time Dura Ace is bought mostly for the "doosh factor" than any other reason. Unless you are actually racing at a fairly high level, all Dura Ace is going to do is relieve you of about an extra $500.......
    I can't say I've ever heard of a crank spindle being snapped. I've heard of crank arms snapping, but they are usually FSA crap and cranks used by especially strong or heavy riders.

    The only Dura-Ace parts I would buy are their hubs. They are excellent hubs. For anything else, Ultegra does the job. Heck, 105 does the job, but Ultegra has come down in price so close to 105, it's worth getting Ultegra.
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

    "Beware of geeks bearing formulas."
    -- Warren Buffett

    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



  11. #11
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    sounds like a nice build. You are specing USA branded frameset so why not continue the theme with ENVE wheelset, KIsh Custom stem but if flex is your enemy them get a DEDA 35mm bar. Trentacinque Archivi - Deda Elementi : Deda Elementi has a good choice of stiff cockpits. I'd go with SRAM over SHIMANO just to continue the American theme. Nothing wrong with Dura Ace though.
    Last edited by kiwisimon; 2 Weeks Ago at 12:22 PM.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by No Time Toulouse View Post
    Well, Dura-Ace costs a lot and is really pretty fragile. Unless you plan to race, I'd stick with Ultegra or 105.
    Dura-Ace fragile? Really? Well, that certainly explains why I haven't had a single problem with my Dura-Ace bike in over 40k miles. Other than replacing cables, chains, brake pads, cassettes, stuff that wears out

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by biscut View Post
    Dura Ace: I've read probably as much as you can find on Dura Ace from a few # designations ago (which it seems anyone who had one says "cats meow") to the newest iteration. Besides "ugly" the only suspect part claimed has been the cassette. Most recommend burning it out and getting an Ultegra.

    In reading my original post I neglected a pretty important request for help! Fork!! I can sling some paragraphs on a Fox 34 or 36 and Rock Shox Pike and get into tokens and sag BUT the plain old carbon road fork...I am sad to say know ZERO about. About all I know is it must be able to accept 32 tires; be disc; and look kewl!!

    Please take me to school on road forks. I'm thinking comfort here...The only person I race is ME.
    3t funda or rígida. Solid both. Have the funda on my road Ti bike. 2 years no issues. I would upgrade to the rígida. The funda is no made in 1 1/8- 1 1/2( the new standard for rigidity). The rígida is.
    Enve is like the candy in the store. They are expensive and I don't think worth the money. Litespeed and lynskey bikes use 3t for their builds last time I checked (2 years ago).
    About your Ti stem. If you won't mind flex in the stem it is ok. The problem with Ti is the butting, the Ti used (6/4 vs 3/2.5 the most common for bike manufacturing) and the tube shape. Most Ti builds use carbon forks and stems to get increase rigidity and control/sprint handling. Ti stems depending on who makes it and how is made would be more giving or rigid. It will never be as rigid as a good carbon one. I am partial here to 3t, Easton or Enve. There are others but those are my favorites. Enve carbon products are expensive with looks and strong. My pick if money is not an issue would be Enve all over for carbon parts except the down tube. That one would be Ti for comfort.
    Custom made Enve wheels by prowheel builder. Or some Boras.
    Sram red etap (which I have on my Ti T1) with the old hexagon silver black design. Or maybe the whole black out etap would look good with the dark
    Enve set up.
    Etap is nice but the batteries are fragile. You can not put any pressure on them when removing the rear wheel or they will break at the tabs.
    Consider campy record EPS or súper record if money is no issue. Very well made and durable. My next build would prob be a record.
    I rode the DA 7900 for some 2 seasons and took me to cat3. It ended up with a broken crank. During a training sprint session the chainring side snapped and I ended with the crank arm/chainring clipped in hanging from my foot. I got it replaced with DA9000 and it is sitting in the shed gathering dust in its original box. The shifters also lost precision and tightness. I went Sram.
    Dura ace cassette doesn't last because cogs are Ti and wear out fast. Had many and decided ultegra rear cassette was the best. About 30gm heavier last time I checked but wears out nicely.
    These are my insighst. Good luck with the build!



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