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  1. #26
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    I've had the Parabox for over a year now, so will stick with it until full road hydraulic release.

    Probably go with Shomano

  2. #27
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    interesting thread -------- the discussion of disc has changed in the last 7 mo or so with the introduction of shimano and sram's new full system. but rather than go full monte with those, I took the easier plug n play version with the TRP hyrd on my Liscio, spyre on my lemond poprad. both are superior by a long ways over bb7, mechanically anyway and weightwise.

    a note on the HYRD's, they are hydro, stop exceptionally well and are lightweight. if you like your 6700 or campy shifters, keep em!

    I'm toying with selling the both '12Liscio ultegra/dura ace/trp and the lemond poprad(sweet gravel rider) and building up a steel Viaje with the same. the combination of components and new wheelset model at 1500gr made as strong as the XL would make this ride around 19.5 - 20 lbs and give me versatility in one bike.

    any thoughts?

  3. #28
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    How wide of a tire can you fit on these?

  4. #29
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    Viaje allows for easily a 40mm. rode the Viaje two days ago and like it. just wanted to see if anyone else here rides a Viaje, can tell me if its as good as it seems? my Liscio is an amazing fit, rides well, I'm just not crazy over the feel/sound of carbon fiber. and my lemond poprad is not geometrically as comfortable for long road days.

  5. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by trumpetbiker View Post
    Viaje allows for easily a 40mm. rode the Viaje two days ago and like it. just wanted to see if anyone else here rides a Viaje, can tell me if its as good as it seems? my Liscio is an amazing fit, rides well, I'm just not crazy over the feel/sound of carbon fiber. and my lemond poprad is not geometrically as comfortable for long road days.
    How wide of a tire can the Liscio fit?

  6. #31
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    The Liscio is a 17lb Disc road bike - I believe the widest rubber it can fit is 28mm without fenders. it was designed as an endurance bike, for comfort and road performance on all form of roads, mild trails. that's the reason I have the poprad disc, to ride to the trails on the roads, have my fun and ride back. the poprad allows me to do gravel and rough trails, etc. that the Liscio isn' meant for. The Viaje is more of a do everything bike.

  7. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by trumpetbiker View Post
    Viaje allows for easily a 40mm. rode the Viaje two days ago and like it. just wanted to see if anyone else here rides a Viaje, can tell me if its as good as it seems? my Liscio is an amazing fit, rides well, I'm just not crazy over the feel/sound of carbon fiber. and my lemond poprad is not geometrically as comfortable for long road days.
    I have had my Vijae for about 7 months now. I have put big fat tires on it and raced a local Gravel race "The Tainthammer" and I just rode the 124 Mile (15,000ft) Death Ride on it yesterday. I do roughly 50/50 road and dirt with the bike. The Vijae handles really well and descends like it is on rails. The rear end is very compliant over bumps yet feels stiff enough when climbing. I think the front end is harsh over bumps and it is no better than my road bike. I really think the bike is over forked and they should have gone or something slimmer for compliance.

    My biggest complaints are that the paint is quite soft and scratches quite easily, the head tubes are too tall for the top tube length and it is heavy (mine is 21.46lbs with pedals and cages running 28c tires.)

    I had to go for a 55cm to keep the front end low enough to be comfortable but this resulted in the top tube being a little short and a longer stem had a negative effect on the handling in the dirt. The Liscio's I rode were even worse in this respect. I am not a lover of tall headtubes that stick your body up into the wind.

    The Vijae was really nice to ride on the death ride but you could feel the weight the climbs.

  8. #33
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    I built up a frame/fork and bought new wheels, the bike probably is about the same as yours with dura ace/trp hyrd/ultegra/XTR RD/new model VL wheelset, have the same issues you do ----------- paint is soft. not as concerned about that part, but interesting you mentioned it and I noticed it. the weight for a road bike is too high, and I have my Liscio for most of my road stuff. but I did send the Viaje to Iowa for Ragbrai, not as many hills on that and I've done it a couple of times on two diff Lemonds, CF and Ti, so this will be the heaviest bike I've ridden------------not to be a weight weanie, anyway. 450mi of rollers and roughly 12,000 ft won't be bad, I've done climbs in the pacific NW with it, so I'm ok with it geared down to the 32 cass/34 compact. from this point on, however, it'll be my winter and gravel ride. love the ride and fit.

    the reach was short for a 57, measured it to be 1/2" shorter than the Liscio 57. put a 120 stem on it, perfect.

  9. #34
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    the disc controversy is way overblown, 3 yrs from now all the naysayers will be wishing they had bought a disc ride. volagi just happened to be the pioneers to push specialized and trek into going the extra mile and now they all will push volagi out with their big corporate machines and flavors.

    regardless ---------------- volagi is a great brand, they don't market to racers, they market to smart people who want their ride to go wherever they want to go. even ritchey has added his disc bike into the mix, suggesting its great for general roadies-----------not racers-----------but he recognizes where its all going and 1/2 way there.

    more pics of volagis here, anyone? has anyone ridden or bought the ti version?

  10. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by trumpetbiker View Post
    more pics of volagis here, anyone? has anyone ridden or bought the ti version?


    Sorry about the thread dredge. I just stumbled on this thread looking for something else.

    I have owned a 60cm Ti Viaje since last March, and I absolutely love it. I ordered the frameset through my LBS, and had them build it up for me.

    It was originally Mechanical Ultegra 6800 (shown in the pic) but has since been converted to Ui2. I did the Ui2 upgrade myself, and had to swap the bottom bracket (to a Enduro TorqTite PF30 24mm adapter) because the original BB did not have enough clearance for the Di2 wires.

    Drivetrain is Ultegra 50/34, 175mm cranks and an Ultegra 11sp 11-28 cassette.

    Ritchey carbon bars and seatpost, Ritchey WCS stem, and Selle Italia Gel Flow saddle.

    TRP Hy/Rd brakes.

    Wheels are HED Belgium C2+ on Chris King R45D hubs. Ritchey Ti skewers.

    This picture shows Shwalbe Marathon Plus tires, but I normally run 28c Conti GP 4 Seasons for road/commuting. I also have a set of 35c Clement XPLOR USH that I use for occasional gravel/dirt/mud road rides. I also have a set of portland fenders and a lightweight aluminum rear rack with a set of Ortieb Sport Roller (formerly called Front roller) I can throw on.

    It has about 1200 miles on it so far (I missed quite a bit of riding last summer due to a shoulder injury). It's as utilitarian as any bike can be. It climbs well, descends well, and is comfortable on all-day rides. It's really all I can ask for for an every day bike.

    It's primary use so far has been my 30 mile round trip, moderately hilly work commute and a handful of long weekend rides. I plan to use it for some credit card touring this summer, once I've fully recovered from my shoulder injury and the Doc gives the go-ahead.


    I think I made my decision - Volagi-voalgi-viaje-ti-machias.jpg
    Last edited by Migen21; 01-31-2016 at 10:21 AM.

  11. #36
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    [QUOTE=Migen21;4987405]

    Sorry about the thread dredge. I just stumbled on this thread looking for something else.



    very nice - I thought about the ti version for a minute when I got mine, the only tiny issue being MONEY. my steel is about 1.2 lb's heavier, I'm sure. with these rides, the weight is less important than the ride and versatility, the fit, the gearing relative to the rest.

    I'm currently building up a front disc only quiring(michigan) ti frame with a nice whiskey fork and trp spyre, should be an interesting comparison to my other built up rides.

  12. #37
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    I just stumbled on my old thread, which is interesting. Sadly my first and last foray into non metal bikes has come to an end. 2 weeks before an event (Levi's GF) I found there MAY be a crack in the frame and the lover right seat stay. With a relatively quick (and wise in my opinion) decision I switched to a steel Gunnar disc frame. It's heavier but I still recorded by far my best LGF time on the bike while looking almost retro. It rides like buttah.
    That being said I'm still sitting on the Volagi frame/fork with stem, bars, crankset. Calfee says about $400 to fix w/o paint assuming it's cracked. They'd have to sand it down and see if it's more than paint damage. Heck I can do that.
    I can try DIY carbon repair and keep it, but I don't have a need for the Volagi since my "lightweight" steel build is in process and the only other bike I'd want is a cross rig. I'm wondering if it's sellable after the repair - the way I told my wife it would be - and for how much.
    Thoughts?

  13. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by steel rider View Post
    I just stumbled on my old thread, which is interesting. Sadly my first and last foray into non metal bikes has come to an end. 2 weeks before an event (Levi's GF) I found there MAY be a crack in the frame and the lover right seat stay. With a relatively quick (and wise in my opinion) decision I switched to a steel Gunnar disc frame. It's heavier but I still recorded by far my best LGF time on the bike while looking almost retro. It rides like buttah.
    That being said I'm still sitting on the Volagi frame/fork with stem, bars, crankset. Calfee says about $400 to fix w/o paint assuming it's cracked. They'd have to sand it down and see if it's more than paint damage. Heck I can do that.
    I can try DIY carbon repair and keep it, but I don't have a need for the Volagi since my "lightweight" steel build is in process and the only other bike I'd want is a cross rig. I'm wondering if it's sellable after the repair - the way I told my wife it would be - and for how much.
    Thoughts?
    Quote Originally Posted by steel rider View Post
    I just stumbled on my old thread, which is interesting. Sadly my first and last foray into non metal bikes has come to an end. 2 weeks before an event (Levi's GF) I found there MAY be a crack in the frame and the lover right seat stay. With a relatively quick (and wise in my opinion) decision I switched to a steel Gunnar disc frame. It's heavier but I still recorded by far my best LGF time on the bike while looking almost retro. It rides like buttah.
    That being said I'm still sitting on the Volagi frame/fork with stem, bars, crankset. Calfee says about $400 to fix w/o paint assuming it's cracked. They'd have to sand it down and see if it's more than paint damage. Heck I can do that.
    I can try DIY carbon repair and keep it, but I don't have a need for the Volagi since my "lightweight" steel build is in process and the only other bike I'd want is a cross rig. I'm wondering if it's sellable after the repair - the way I told my wife it would be - and for how much.
    Thoughts?

    I sold my Liscio a couple of years ago, kept my steel Volagi Viaji, because I liked steel. since I've sold it, I've heard of others with the CF version with cracks ---------- infrequent as they are.

    since the company has shut its doors, there are no warrantees out there anymore, no replacement frames from Robert Choi.

    the issue you are asking is should you fix and sell. I think purchasing a used CF frame from any manufacturer is risky anyway, and many won't do it. when the frame is advertised as a repaired frame, and in good faith you should ALWAYS disclose that (legally, if you don't and the person breaks the frame and finds out it was repaired without their knowledge, you are liable, big $$ damages) even if by Calfee, most will not pay what you feel its worth and you may not get the money back you put into the repair. if you DIYS with a kit, NO ONE will purchase it that plans on using it, and will only buy for pennies on the dollar. paint, resell, blame the repair on you if it breaks with the next guy.

    that's the expensive and litigation world we live in.

    best thing to do at this point is fix to use only, or hang it on the wall. steel and Ti frames get "retired" sometimes as well, because they are too costly to fix based on eventual resale value. the only time it makes sense to fix a frame like this one is if you plan on riding it a lot longer.

    your Gunnar is actually a pretty damn nice ride, write off the Volagi and hang it up, stay with "metal".


    my opinion, and worth what you paid for that opinion!!

  14. #39
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    You are probably right. I did find a place near Los Gatos that may scan it for $100. If thatís true and it turns out to not be cracked I can sell. If itís cracked I doubt anyone would buy even after a fix. I could DIY and maybe use for a cross or street ride, but realistically it would just hang in the garage for a long long time.
    Thatíd be a shame on many levels. I hate to see such waste.

  15. #40
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    Robert designed a really nice suite of bikes. It's sad what happened to the company after his accident. I was hoping he would be able to bootstrap it and get it going again.

    My Ti Viaje is still going strong. I'll never get rid of it, at least not unless the frame fails for some reason.

    Sadly, there probably isn't much value in a repaired frame made by a company who out of business.

    I personally wouldn't ever sell a repaired frame, or one that was suspect for fear someone may injure themselves on it.

    I think there was a n ebay auction a few months back where someone got possession of a bunch of warranty return carbon Volagi frames and tried to sell them on Ebay in bulk. Robert never responded to the legitimacy of the auction, but Barley Foresman (co-designer of the bikes) came out and said they were supposed to have gone to a landfill, so it wasn't anyone affiliated with the company that was selling them - at least not in an official capacity.

    Edit to add: If it were me, I'd probably invest in repairing the bike and keep it as a backup/all weather bike. For me, the only other option is to trash it.

  16. #41
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    Yes it is sad. I really like the idea of supporting a boutique company but sometimes things like this happen I guess.
    I plan to repair it myself if it is indeed cracked, then slowly accumulate used parts to make it an around town bike - perhaps sans disc. Not ideal but thatís OK. Iíll have a great story, a great Gunnar all road bike, and a great Taylor custom. Not bad.

  17. #42
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    I still ride my Liscio, it's a nice bike. The unfortunate fact is that while Volagi was a leader in the disc/endurance market, they've long been since passed by, even before Roberts accident, there are more and in many cases, better choices out there these days.

    If you feel confident the frame is solid after the repair, you could always hand it off to someone in need of an upgrade.

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