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  1. #1
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    Italian Bike Restoration Project

    Asking for some wisdom from our restoration pros here...

    Been itching to get my hands dirty with a new bike project and been searching for fun frames to build up and restore (built my first road bike, a Cannondale Six13 over a year ago). I'd love to try my hand at a restoration of an old Italian steel frame, as I'm sure there are a ton out there that need some lovin'.

    Ran across this http://www.ebay.com/itm/330756044444...#ht_794wt_1270
    The faded paintjob shows hints of that classic Bottecchia red white chrome paintjob. It's pretty beatup, but after a new powder coat and some decals it might look pretty legit.

    My question is, is it worth it to get something in such bad shape? There is another Bottecchia in much better condition going for 500, which would probably be what a complete restoration of the frame above (powdercoat, chrome, fork, decals) would total up to. Is the experience worth it? Does the damage described make it seem a bit iffy?

    Thanks
    Kevin

  2. #2
    PRB
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    The line about the paint around the headtube would make me pretty reluctant. It may end up needing more work than you anticipate.
    Four wheels move your body, two wheels move your soul.

  3. #3
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    thanks! i will definitely reconsider

  4. #4
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    Negative. Look for something better as a project. Too many flags on this.
    There's sometimes a buggy.
    How many drivers does a buggy have?

    One.

    So let's just say I'm drivin' this buggy...
    and if you fix your attitude you can ride along with me.

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  5. #5
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    I can't speak to the money you will drop on the whole project - especially if you try to do it accurately with the correct year of campy record, etc. But a repaint will cost you at least $600 or more.

  6. #6
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    Just finished up a restoration on an old Italian made Nishiki (I know, wierd). There is a thread called "My Bike Project" with a few pics. I went with a powder coat, which was about 200. I was really happy with the powdercoat, but talk with the shop and don't go with the cheapest, or you''ll end up with an industrial powdercoat job. My project cost about 700 and I used many of the orignal parts, and got the bike for 50$. All the work done myself including building the wheels. Tools might also be expensive if you don't have any.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by rpetitho View Post
    Just finished up a restoration on an old Italian made Nishiki (I know, wierd). There is a thread called "My Bike Project" with a few pics. I went with a powder coat, which was about 200. I was really happy with the powdercoat, but talk with the shop and don't go with the cheapest, or you''ll end up with an industrial powdercoat job. My project cost about 700 and I used many of the orignal parts, and got the bike for 50$. All the work done myself including building the wheels. Tools might also be expensive if you don't have any.
    I was actually mainly inspired by your thread rpetitho! Came out fantastic. I think this one might be way more work and money than I can feasibly handle. I'm going to keep looking till the right one comes along.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by ksh2115 View Post
    I was actually mainly inspired by your thread rpetitho! Came out fantastic. I think this one might be way more work and money than I can feasibly handle. I'm going to keep looking till the right one comes along.
    Thanks very much! My only recommdation on finding the right bike would be always be on the lookout. I was on a x-country roadtrip when I found mine, Mississippi didn't have much selection but I had good luck in California. The longer you look the more you will be willing to spend! Good luck on your endevors.

  9. #9
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    I would pass on this due to possible crash damage to head tube. Keep looking as there are some great deals if your patient.

    Even if the frame is rusted, as long as the inside of frame is good a repaint can work. Most auto body shops can sand blast prime and paint for about $150. Check out my Bottecchia rescue/restore thread in the retro classic for some idea of what an old rusty bike can be restored to.

    Restoring an old classic Italian frame is one of the most satisfying experiences a cyclist can have.

  10. #10
    warrrrrrrgh!!!
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    damage aside, that frame looks kinda low-end anyway. If I were going to go through the trouble as restoring an italian road frame, I would want to do it with a race bike. Not a gas pipe beater.
    I hate you all

    j/k lol kthxbye!

  11. #11
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    I used to work for Shopgoodwill.com website and we had a project road bike come in one time that had been poorly painted white and it was being converted to a single speed/fixie. g At first glance, you're thinking," That bike is a piece of crap." After looking at the frame, it occured to me that a great sacrilege had been commited. Under the crappy paint were really nice lugs with the Colnago clover engraved in them. That did it for me. While I didn't win the auction, the guy that did is still restoring it. He has put a lot of time into it and having a hard time finding some of the NOS parts, but he's doing it slowly. Supposedly, there was some rust on the frame and he's had all of that repaired. Not sure if I would do such a restoration, but it would be a worthy project. That Bottechia is in better shape than the Nag. If you're heart is in it, do it. A vintage Bottechia is a really nice bike and awesome conversation piece too.

  12. #12
    warrrrrrrgh!!!
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    Quote Originally Posted by terbennett View Post
    I used to work for Shopgoodwill.com website and we had a project road bike come in one time that had been poorly painted white and it was being converted to a single speed/fixie. g At first glance, you're thinking," That bike is a piece of crap." After looking at the frame, it occured to me that a great sacrilege had been commited. Under the crappy paint were really nice lugs with the Colnago clover engraved in them. That did it for me. While I didn't win the auction, the guy that did is still restoring it. He has put a lot of time into it and having a hard time finding some of the NOS parts, but he's doing it slowly. Supposedly, there was some rust on the frame and he's had all of that repaired. Not sure if I would do such a restoration, but it would be a worthy project. That Bottechia is in better shape than the Nag. If you're heart is in it, do it. A vintage Bottechia is a really nice bike and awesome conversation piece too.
    I appreciate your story, but not all Bottechias are built the same. And that one is a bike boom pos. Colnagos are a different breed, and you can see the difference in about 3 seconds.
    I hate you all

    j/k lol kthxbye!

  13. #13
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    Learning so much already. Keep it coming guys. Always appreciate your wisdom.

  14. #14
    jd3
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    I did a restoration of what must be the same frame. No, it's not a frame to put a lot time and money into for a classic geared road bike. I wanted to build a blinged out single speed. Here is what I did. This was a rattle can paint job.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Italian Bike Restoration Project-.jpg   Italian Bike Restoration Project-bott002.jpg   Italian Bike Restoration Project-bott009.jpg   Italian Bike Restoration Project-bott017.jpg   Italian Bike Restoration Project-bott018.jpg  

    “You can't control the wind, but you can adjust your sails.” – Albert Einstein

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by jd3 View Post
    I did a restoration of what must be the same frame. No, it's not a frame to put a lot time and money into for a classic geared road bike. I wanted to build a blinged out single speed. Here is what I did. This was a rattle can paint job.
    That is gorgeous. May I ask what paint you used? It seems like your frame started off in significantly better shape than the one I'm looking at.

  16. #16
    jd3
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    Quote Originally Posted by ksh2115 View Post
    That is gorgeous. May I ask what paint you used? It seems like your frame started off in significantly better shape than the one I'm looking at.
    Thank you. I totally stripped the frame, had it re-chromed, and painted it with automotive spray paint from the auto parts store. The thing that made the rattle can paint job work was the clear coat. Thanks to Dave Hickey For you rattle can painters
    “You can't control the wind, but you can adjust your sails.” – Albert Einstein

  17. #17
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    jd3,

    That is awesome. Would like to hear more about the rechrome process and tell me where you got that head badge or is it a decal?

    My Bottecchia started off as poor condition but the frame was straight and true.


    Sand blast, prime and paint at autobody shop (less than $100)



    Now




    sorry for the derail but figured this was somewhat relevant and love showing of this rescue.

  18. #18
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    Interested in an 86 red Gios compact?

    Actually, I will be selling it, but she is road ready and almost mint with full dura-ace of the time.


    Damn!

    You guys did some nice work! Those rides will catch anybodies eye even if they don't know the history!

  19. #19
    jd3
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    [QUOTE=BacDoc;3985853]jd3,

    That is awesome. Would like to hear more about the rechrome process and tell me where you got that head badge or is it a decal?

    i just took the frame to the local chrome shop. It was $200,00 to re-chrome it. The head badge is a decal. It and the world and Italian stripes came from some decals I got on Ebay. I had the local vinyl sign shop make the chrome Bottecchia decals.
    “You can't control the wind, but you can adjust your sails.” – Albert Einstein

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