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  1. #1
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    LItespeed Titanium,,,, what was the favorite models?

    thanks to anyone who posted in my titanium thread,,, the bike I wanted got sold!!!! but while in that threading reading everything I wondered,,,, is there a favorite frame model and is there a least favorite something to avoid..

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tajue17 View Post
    thanks to anyone who posted in my titanium thread,,, the bike I wanted got sold!!!! but while in that threading reading everything I wondered,,,, is there a favorite frame model and is there a least favorite something to avoid..
    Favorite (road) frame without a doubt is the Vortex. The Blade was a popular TT bike, and the Ultimate a popular crit bike, but the Vortex was undoubtedly the top of the line in every aspect.

  3. #3
    pmf
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    Avoid any Litespeed that was made after David Lynskey sold it to the American Bicycle Group. They made a model that was really light weight (at the time) for climbing. It turned out to be a complete noodle unless you were a small rider (I forget the name of the model right now).

    I always liked the look of the Classic, and the bikes they built for Eddy Merckx. My wife had a Tuscany and I have a 1999 Ultimate which I still ride (it's on it's second generation of components). There's a ton of used frames for sale on ebay. They're damn near indestructible.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by pmf View Post
    Avoid any Litespeed that was made after David Lynskey sold it to the American Bicycle Group. They made a model that was really light weight (at the time) for climbing. It turned out to be a complete noodle unless you were a small rider (I forget the name of the model right now).

    I always liked the look of the Classic, and the bikes they built for Eddy Merckx. My wife had a Tuscany and I have a 1999 Ultimate which I still ride (it's on it's second generation of components). There's a ton of used frames for sale on ebay. They're damn near indestructible.
    Not trying to be a jerk, but I just can't resist pointing out how dumb your first paragraph sounded. Seriously. Read it again:

    "Avoid any Litespeed that was made after David Lynskey sold it to the American Bicycle Group. They made a model that was really light weight (at the time) for climbing. It turned out to be a complete noodle unless you were a small rider (I forget the name of the model right now)."

    First off, in the eighteen years Litespeed existed after being sold, they (according to you) made one overly-flexible frame, and thus you contend that the entire brand should be avoided?

    Second, you can't even remember the name of the model (much less the model-year) that was supposedly a 'noodle', yet you expect us to believe that this is a true story. Hey, guess what? Trek made a bike a few years ago that caught fire when you went over a large bump. I can't remember the name of the model right now....

    Third, it never crossed your mind that maybe some (if not all) or the fabrication techniques that Lynskey used were continued at Litespeed, or dare I even say, improved upon after nearly two decades since Lynskey's departure?

    Your post epitomizes the kind of brainlessness that makes bike customers suckers.
    Last edited by Waspinator; 2 Weeks Ago at 04:30 PM.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Waspinator View Post
    Not trying to be a jerk, but I just can't resist pointing out how dumb your first paragraph sounded. Seriously. Read it again:

    "Avoid any Litespeed that was made after David Lynskey sold it to the American Bicycle Group. They made a model that was really light weight (at the time) for climbing. It turned out to be a complete noodle unless you were a small rider (I forget the name of the model right now)."

    First off, in the eighteen years Litespeed existed after being sold, they (according to you) made one overly-flexible frame, and thus you contend that the entire brand should be avoided?

    Second, you can't even remember the name of the model (much less the model-year) that was supposedly a 'noodle'.

    Third, it never crossed your mind that maybe some (if not all) or the fabrication techniques that Lynskey used were continued at Litespeed, or dare I even say, improved upon after nearly two decades since Lynskey's departure?

    Your post epitomizes the kind of brainlessness that makes bike customers suckers.
    try harder please.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by kiwisimon View Post
    try harder please.
    Remember, he's the guy that insists that thru-axles are a vastly inferior design to quick releases.
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

    "Beware of geeks bearing formulas."
    -- Warren Buffett

    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



  7. #7
    Hammer
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    I spent 6 years using my Blade for TT's and some ultra cycling events and enjoyed it quite a bit.

  8. #8
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    What year was the sale?

    I believe the noodle is the Ghisello. Name is most likely misspelled

    My favorite by far is my Greg LeMond, made by litespeed to LeMonds design. Similar to the classic. Bought in winter of 91/92. Still ride it with it's second set of components. More relaxed than the vortex

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Herbie View Post
    I believe the noodle is the Ghisello. Name is most likely misspelled
    Ghisallo, named after the Madonna del Ghisallo chapel. It was a superlight climbing bike and sold as such. It had a weight limit to emphasize that it was a very light bike.

  10. #10
    pmf
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kerry Irons View Post
    Ghisallo, named after the Madonna del Ghisallo chapel. It was a superlight climbing bike and sold as such. It had a weight limit to emphasize that it was a very light bike.
    Yep, that was it. And it was marketed as a light weight climbers bike. I just mentioned it because it's probably one model to avoid unless you're very light weight.

    Waspinator ... good to know you're still out there consuming oxygen. There's so much I have yet to learn from you.

  11. #11
    pmf
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    Quote Originally Posted by kiwisimon View Post
    try harder please.
    No, he generally seems to perfectly land it on the first try. He just doesn't know when to stop.

  12. #12
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    The Ghisallo was built when Dave still owned Litespeed. A friend of mine at the time, owned a Classic & was looking at one as an upgrade. I don't think flex was an issue unless the weight limit was exceeded. My friend passed on the Ghisallo because the tubes a very thin.

    That was an issue for him because he liked the bright, polished finish. The Ghisallo because the tubes were so thin, could only be repolished so much or risk tube failure. That was straight from Litespeed at the time.

  13. #13
    pmf
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    Quote Originally Posted by stan01 View Post
    The Ghisallo was built when Dave still owned Litespeed. A friend of mine at the time, owned a Classic & was looking at one as an upgrade. I don't think flex was an issue unless the weight limit was exceeded. My friend passed on the Ghisallo because the tubes a very thin.

    That was an issue for him because he liked the bright, polished finish. The Ghisallo because the tubes were so thin, could only be repolished so much or risk tube failure. That was straight from Litespeed at the time.
    Yes, that frame was made by Lynskey. I never meant to imply that the current Litespeed owned by ABG made that frame. They must not have sold many. I never see used ones for sale on ebay -- when I'm bored, I surf used Merck's, Colnago's and Litespeed's on ebay.

  14. #14
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    My favorites are the ones they built for Eddy Merckx--the Majestic and the AX.


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