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  1. #1
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    Lynskey feedback

    Iím considering the Lynskey GR 260 and its Pro variant and am looking for some feedback both about them and on Lynskey generally. Since they market directly, I canít test ride the bikes beforehand, but can return it in 30 days if it turns out that made I poor choice. Iíd like to get it right the first time though.


    Both GR260 models use double-butted 3Al-2.5V Ti tubing; the Pro uses harder 6Al-4V tubing in the chainstays and top tube though. The geometry is the same for either. Iím guessing that the benefit of the 6-4 tubing would only be apparent off-pavement and would be slight. Am I off base with that? Frankly, Iíd rather put that extra money into an upgraded wheelset.


    Iím impressed by the nice touches like replaceable rear dropouts and 68mm threaded bottom bracket and have yet to read anything negative about Lynskey. There are not a lot of reviews or owner comments that I can find, so I thought Iíd ask here for feedback from anyone with firsthand experience with Lynskey. I know the GR 260 is new, so would also appreciate hearing from any GR 450 owners.


  2. #2
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    I would suggest taking a look at ebay. Lynskey has been dumping bikes there at some really great prices. I don't know of that applies to a newer model like this. I pickled up a R240 last year from Lynskey on ebay for <$700

  3. #3
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    They even have a Helix up for $699.
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  4. #4
    pmf
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    Weren't those mostly either really small or really large sizes?

    Even so, it's worth a look -- $700 for a Lynskey titanium frame must be close to cost.

    I have a Lynskey Litespeed (1999 Ultimate), my wife has a Lynskey R350. He makes nice bikes. I wouldn't pay a lot extra for 6/4. It's primarily used to save weight. I don't think it rides any different than 3/2.5. It is more brittle than 3/2.5 and a lot harder to work with -- hence the higher cost. Indeed -- wheels are a better investment.

  5. #5
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    Lynskey feedback

    I like my sportive (2010/2011).

    Lighter than steel, more comfortable than AL and less ass-splosive than carbon. This is not to say Iím not happy with my bike. I often wish that Iíd spent Ti money on my CX bike and AL money on my road bike.

    Anyway, Iíd always consider a second (if equal) wheelset a better investment. Maybe thatís because I ham-fist my way through rough rides and donít always get a chance to turn a spoke-wrench between rides.

    In the end, no complaints about the company, although I bought through a shop.


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  6. #6
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    I don't have much to say about 3/2 vs. 6/4 aside from hearing that the latter can be a bit harsh. Even if it's not, I'd get the 3/2 and some nice wheels. Everybody needs nice wheels.

    I have had two Lynskeys since 2011: a Ridgeline (29er MTB) and a Cooper (road). The Cooper had a weird little QC issue that took a while to figure out (bead blasting media didn't get completely cleaned out and was causing headset bearing/steerer interference issues), but they were great to work with. They ended up replacing the fork, and I cleaned out the frame on my end. The salesguys also like to bargain, which is always appreciated. They threw in a ti seat post for either free or like $50 with the Ridgeline and they took a couple hundred bucks off of the Cooper. I have heard that warranty work isn't as easy/free as it is with some of the bigger brands out there, but I've never had to use it.

    Aside from that, I have no complaints. They're well made, have surprisingly pretty welds, are reasonably priced, and ride very well. I have other bikes, and have had other bikes come and go since I've had the Lynskeys, but I've not liked any as much. I've tried to replace the Cooper a couple of times (why? dunno), but nothing out there that I've tried is as good to ride.

    Those eBay prices are impossible to beat, and I've been tempted a time or two. I'd certainly buy another. Things like threaded BBs and not really having to worry about hurting the frame like you do with carbon or light aluminum are big selling points. Also... no paint. My Lynskey frames look pretty much new, and my 1-year-old Trek looks fairly beat.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by CharlieRN View Post
    Iím considering the Lynskey GR 260 and its Pro variant and am looking for some feedback both about them and on Lynskey generally. Since they market directly, I canít test ride the bikes beforehand, but can return it in 30 days if it turns out that made I poor choice. Iíd like to get it right the first time though.


    Both GR260 models use double-butted 3Al-2.5V Ti tubing; the Pro uses harder 6Al-4V tubing in the chainstays and top tube though. The geometry is the same for either. Iím guessing that the benefit of the 6-4 tubing would only be apparent off-pavement and would be slight. Am I off base with that? Frankly, Iíd rather put that extra money into an upgraded wheelset.


    Iím impressed by the nice touches like replaceable rear dropouts and 68mm threaded bottom bracket and have yet to read anything negative about Lynskey. There are not a lot of reviews or owner comments that I can find, so I thought Iíd ask here for feedback from anyone with firsthand experience with Lynskey. I know the GR 260 is new, so would also appreciate hearing from any GR 450 owners.

    There are 5 R350's listed by Lynskey on ebay right now. Starting bid of $599, buy it now is $799. No fork. Worth a look. You still get the warranty

  8. #8
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    Iíve owned two R255ís. One direct and one off eBay. Both were great but the one off eBay had to have the B.B. threads chased. Lynskey only apologized, but for the price I wonít complain.

  9. #9
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    My perspective- they seem like lower-quality and rely on high volume and high-pressure sales. I have seen a lot of 50%-60% off but would not buy one. In the MTB world, they really tried to make inroads starting~10 years ago and did okay for 2-4 years. I heard of several cracking at weld and of alignment issues. Plus...flexy. I called them a couple of time to chat about a frame but was totally put off by the sales pressure and the negative reviews soon after. I am looking for a Ti bike but even at half the price, I would not consider a Lynskey. I'm sure others have positive perspectives.

  10. #10
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    ^ There was a particular salesman that used to work there that gave the process a used car dealer vibe. It was a bit unsettling. He's no longer there. That said, I haven't bought anything from them in years, so I can't really comment.

    I've not found either of mine to be excessively flexy, but I am also not a huge person. Same applies to the cracking frames. I have read about a couple broken frames online (all from several years ago), but hey, every frame can and will crack. It's how the manufacturer deals with it that matters.

    When it comes to quality, no, these don't have welds that are quite as pretty as an Eriksen or Moots. Then again, these frames usually cost 25% or less than one of those. You have to have realistic expectations. Even with the ever-so-slightly less nice stack of dimes or whatever, I'd still buy a Lynskey (again) over one of the more expensive alternatives. There's just not that much tangible, actual difference between any of them. They're all very good.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pisgah2000 View Post
    I don't have much to say about 3/2 vs. 6/4 aside from hearing that the latter can be a bit harsh.
    Hearing? Is that like "hearing" that Al frames are super stiff and steel is laterally stiff and vertically compliant?

    The advantage of 6/4 is saving weight. If a 6/4 bike is stiffer, it is because the tubes are bigger, differently shaped, have thicker walls, has steeper frame angles, etc. It's not because of the material.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kerry Irons View Post
    Hearing? Is that like "hearing" that Al frames are super stiff and steel is laterally stiff and vertically compliant?
    Yes, obviously. When buying my Cooper, Lynskey mentioned that their 6/4 frames are stiffer and less comfortable than their 3/2 frames. I'm sure that is for a variety of reasons. It may not apply to their current offerings.

  13. #13
    PMC
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    I have a 2017 Urbano I built up and totally enjoy riding it. I had zero quality issues on my bike and other than taking a while to get it I have no complaints. If I were in the market for another Ti bike and specifically a Ti gravel bike I'd be all over a GR260. Prices seem very fair and I've never seen any GR series frameset being sold by them on Ebay.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kerry Irons View Post
    Hearing? Is that like "hearing" that Al frames are super stiff and steel is laterally stiff and vertically compliant?

    The advantage of 6/4 is saving weight. If a 6/4 bike is stiffer, it is because the tubes are bigger, differently shaped, have thicker walls, has steeper frame angles, etc. It's not because of the material.
    I'm going to disagree with you, to a point. Drawn titanium tubing rides and feels different than cold worked tubing. Virtually all 6/4 titanium bikes start out as ti sheet that is then cold worked into shape. When either 3/2.5 or 6/4 is extensively worked some of the natural "woodiness" of drawn ti tubing changes to a more steel like feel.

    Having ridden multiple examples of all drawn vs. cold worked titanium road bikes, I agree with this assessment.

    Spectrum Cycles | Materials

    So while I agree it isn't purely a question of alloy, since both alloys will feel similar if worked similarly, it wouldn't be ridiculous to say that ti bikes made of round drawn 3/2.5 is going to feel different than most any 6/4 bike.

    This point also goes to how the tubing is butted. If you want to preserve the drawn qualities, the butting has to be done by removing material rather than swaging.


    The other issue with comparing the alloys is that the point of using 6/4 is that you can use thinner tube walls, and larger diameters to achieve stiffness, and a large thin tube is going to feel different than a smaller thick walled tube.
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    Quote Originally Posted by PMC View Post
    I have a 2017 Urbano I built up and totally enjoy riding it. I had zero quality issues on my bike and other than taking a while to get it I have no complaints. If I were in the market for another Ti bike and specifically a Ti gravel bike I'd be all over a GR260. Prices seem very fair and I've never seen any GR series frameset being sold by them on Ebay.
    Though I really want the GR260, the e-Bay price for an Urbansky frame was irresistible and I put a bid at the minimum listing of $599. It won, so I'll be building up what Lynskey describes as:
    ". . . the ultimate all around bike we hand make. It is perfect for anything from short touring, gravel grinding, or riding around town and daily commutes."

    Thanks to all for the Lynskey feedback.
    Last edited by CharlieRN; 2 Weeks Ago at 12:58 PM.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kontact View Post
    I'm going to disagree with you, to a point. Drawn titanium tubing rides and feels different than cold worked tubing. Virtually all 6/4 titanium bikes start out as ti sheet that is then cold worked into shape. When either 3/2.5 or 6/4 is extensively worked some of the natural "woodiness" of drawn ti tubing changes to a more steel like feel.

    Having ridden multiple examples of all drawn vs. cold worked titanium road bikes, I agree with this assessment.

    Spectrum Cycles | Materials

    So while I agree it isn't purely a question of alloy, since both alloys will feel similar if worked similarly, it wouldn't be ridiculous to say that ti bikes made of round drawn 3/2.5 is going to feel different than most any 6/4 bike.

    This point also goes to how the tubing is butted. If you want to preserve the drawn qualities, the butting has to be done by removing material rather than swaging.


    The other issue with comparing the alloys is that the point of using 6/4 is that you can use thinner tube walls, and larger diameters to achieve stiffness, and a large thin tube is going to feel different than a smaller thick walled tube.
    A properly designed bike takes into account the properties of the materials used to achieve the design goals. The post stated that 6/4 bikes were stiffer than 3/2 bikes. This is only true if they are designed to be stiffer. While it is true that 6/4 tubes are formed by rolled sheet rather than extrusion, this does not somehow automatically make 6/4 bikes stiffer than 3/2 bikes. And your last paragraph is in 100% agreement with what I said.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kerry Irons View Post
    A properly designed bike takes into account the properties of the materials used to achieve the design goals. The post stated that 6/4 bikes were stiffer than 3/2 bikes. This is only true if they are designed to be stiffer. While it is true that 6/4 tubes are formed by rolled sheet rather than extrusion, this does not somehow automatically make 6/4 bikes stiffer than 3/2 bikes. And your last paragraph is in 100% agreement with what I said.
    Which is why my first paragraph says "to a point". 6/4 bikes are generally stiffer than 3/2.5 because that's part of the reason to use the material - to create lighter elements by using oversized thinner walled tubing than what you can do with 3/2.5. Which isn't much different than a comparison of steel and aluminum. Today, aluminum tubing is chosen for its low weight and high stiffness, but aluminum bikes used to have narrow tubes and be flexible. No one does the latter anymore, and aluminum bikes are now considered to be stiff bikes because that's the way you utilize the material.

    I'm just saying that it is reasonable to expect that a knowledgeable builder used 6/4 because they are trying to make a lighter, stiffer frame than they could with 3/2.5. Whether they succeed is up to reviewers.
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    I didn't see your thread before you indicated you had made the purchase. I bought an R240 last year from Lynskey on ebay and added a fork and headset with the purchase. Great service.....they even set the crown race on the fork for me even though I told the sale rep I could do all that myself. It has become my favorite bike to ride as my Fondriest carbon and Strong custom steel bikes are hanging in the garage needing some seat time.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kontact View Post
    I'm just saying that it is reasonable to expect that a knowledgeable builder used 6/4 because they are trying to make a lighter, stiffer frame than they could with 3/2.5. Whether they succeed is up to reviewers.
    Remember the Litespeed Ghisallo? The sole goal was light weight. It was 6/4 and fairly flexy. I don't find your expectation reasonable. Builders can use 6/4 to save weight at equal stiffness, or stiffer at equal weight. At the risk of repeating myself yet again, it's about the design goal, not the material.

    There are way too many "knowns" in the bike business that are in fact simply wrong and I consider it a public service to the readers of this board to point them out when they are stated. That 6/4 frames are stiffer is one of those simply false "knowns."

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    Quote Originally Posted by cdhbrad View Post
    I didn't see your thread before you indicated you had made the purchase. I bought an R240 last year from Lynskey on ebay and added a fork and headset with the purchase. Great service.....they even set the crown race on the fork for me even though I told the sale rep I could do all that myself. It has become my favorite bike to ride as my Fondriest carbon and Strong custom steel bikes are hanging in the garage needing some seat time.
    Thanks for this. Based on your remarks, I did the same thing and added an Endurance fork and CC headset. Lynskey will seat the bearing races and ship me the complete frameset, charging only for the added parts. Looking forward to this one!

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