Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 69
  1. #1
    What the what???
    Reputation: Opus51569's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    7,620

    The Lynskey Peloton

    Right now, it's just a UPS tracking number. Soon it should be a Lynskey Peloton I recently ordered from Adrenaline Bikes.

    My intent is to make this a chronicle of sorts starting with the buying experience... then the bike and set-up... and finally some ride reports.

    I'll also be posting requisite bike pr0n photos along the way.

    In the meantime... you never realize how many UPS trucks there are on the road until you're waiting for a package to arrive...

    In our next exciting episode... "The Buying Experience: or, Whadya Mean You Can Customize Anything???"
    Nothing in all the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity. - MLK

  2. #2
    What the what???
    Reputation: Opus51569's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    7,620

    The Lynskey Peloton

    The process really began with a previous thread here. I had done some preliminary searching based on a few basic requirements:

    A titanium frame
    A maximum budget of 3K (complete bike, new)
    Relaxed geometry

    The budget, in particular, quickly narrowed my choices to one of three options: Bikes Direct, Litespeed or Lynskey.

    With the previous thread, I solicited feedback which led me to take a closer look at Lynskey.

    On their website they had a "Silver" series that included the Roleur and the Peloton. They have since eliminated the "Silver Series" and moved the Peloton to their "Sport" series and the Roleur to their "Pro" series. Of the two, the more relaxed geometry of the Peloton seemed to fit my needs.

    I ended up not buying directly from Lynskey primarily because I couldn't customize the fit of the bike. They sell by size (S-XL) and with that comes standard bar width, crank length, stem length, etc. I know my own fit well enough to know that a 172.5 crank works, but 42cm bars are too narrow for me. According to the person I spoke with at Lynskey, customizing sizes wasn't an option for the Peloton. Ultimately, I couldn't justify spending 3K on a bike knowing that I would have to spend additional money swapping out parts to get the fit that I needed.

    So... I took a look at Adrenaline Bikes.

    On their website, they advertise that you can, essentially, customize anything. For most builds they include multiple build kits and say that if you want something that isn't on their list, to contact them. I found the idea of choosing so many of my own options pretty appealing. Before I contacted them, I set about putting together a Peloton using the options they listed on their site. I found I could get something that fit my needs for under 3K. So, I sent them an e-mail and started the process.

    I worked with Jesse, who suggested we begin via e-mail. I sent him the list I had put together and he gave me some suggestions as well. He was initially very quick to respond and always helpful. I never got a sense of being "up-sold" on anything. Because they're a LBS in California, they could, indeed, mix and match brands and sizes based on what I needed.

    The only issue I ran into was the wheel set. The stock wheels for their build are Fulcrum 5s. I've never ridden them, but I know myself enough to know that low spoke count wheels and my Clyde body are not compatible. Jesse was able to source a set of 32 spoke wheels, but I wasn't confident about them. So, I decided to stick with the Fulcrums and hope they hold up for a while.

    Once we had finalized most of the details via e-mail. I called to process the order. During that discussion, I realized just how customizable the bike was. With the saddle, for example, one of the options listed on the Adrenaline site is a Brooks Team Pro. During our phone conversation, I mentioned I was a fan of the B-17. Jesse said he could do that, no problem. I wanted 28c tires and was hoping for some Ruffy Tuffy's. While Jesse couldn't source those, he could source some Jack Brown's. So, I went with those. The point is, they really can customize practically anything and if you decide to buy from them, don't be afraid to ask about options even if they aren't "on the menu". In each case for me, the new options were swapped in for the same price as the standard upgrade.

    Oddly enough, the simplicity of the ordering process ended up being one of the things that gave me a moment of pause. I talked through all of the choices over the phone. I gave my payment information... and that was it. The bike was ordered. Since I bought the bike over the phone, there wasn't a receipt or a printed invoice involved as there would be with an LBS or even an online order. Some people may find that disconcerting (my wife certainly did) . It might have been more reassuring to receive at least an e-mail confirmation of the order after the fact.

    The only other issue was the fact that once the order was placed, the lag between responses to e-mails grew pretty quickly. I had a question, for example, about when the bike would ship and if there would be a tracking number. Comparatively, it took quite a while to get a response. I assume (and it's just an assumption on my part) that once the order was placed, I wasn't as much of a priority any more. I get that. It's a business. My advice to others would be to call instead of e-mail if there are questions after the sale.

    All in all, the experience of buying the bike was very positive. Jesse was personable and very accommodating. The business model is pretty smart. The store allows you to build your own bike with only the parts you want without the hassle of sourcing all of the components yourself. No compatibility issues. You just have to know what you want. With so many options, it helps to do a little research. In the end, I came in just under my 3K budget (shipping included) and was still able to upgrade the saddle, tires, seat post, stem and headset to the components I wanted.

    Today is Thursday. UPS tracking tells me the bike is currently in Lenexa, KS. If you're in the neighborhood, give it a wave.

    Next Up - "Christmas Morning"
    Last edited by Opus51569; 03-31-2014 at 04:29 AM.
    Nothing in all the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity. - MLK

  3. #3
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    2,503
    Great write up , keep them coming.

  4. #4
    PCM
    PCM is offline
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: PCM's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    179
    I agree with mikerp... keep the updates coming.

  5. #5
    What the what???
    Reputation: Opus51569's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    7,620

    The Lynskey Peloton

    The Lynskey Peloton-imageuploadedbytapatalk1396057959.067307.jpg

    The UPS man brought this box out of his truck and for just a moment I thought "Uh oh." Then it occurred to me that since Adrenaline built up the bike, test rode it, and then packaged it, they probably reused a full-sized bike box.

    Sure enough, inside was a Lynskey. "Whew!"

    The Lynskey Peloton-imageuploadedbytapatalk1396058233.862762.jpg

    I opened the box to find the bike relatively well mummified in bubble-wrap and tape. The rear wheel was the exception, but it did have plastic spacers on the axles to protect it and the box itself wasn't damaged.

    The Lynskey Peloton-imageuploadedbytapatalk1396058454.898842.jpg

    The Lynskey Peloton-imageuploadedbytapatalk1396058476.970959.jpg

    Out of the box, the bike came mostly assembled. Putting it together consisted of only:

    Bolting the front brake to the forks
    Removing the stem face plate
    Putting the bars in position
    Bolting on the stem face plate
    Installing the skewer and front wheel
    Centering the front brake
    Bolting the post/saddle combo into the seat tube
    Installing the pedals and bottle cages (mine)
    Airing up the tires

    Everything else (cabling, derailleurs, cranks, headset, etc.) was already assembled.

    Once I had everything together, I went over every bolt and adjustment. No problems.

    By then, it was dark. I'm hoping to get a shake-down ride in tomorrow and will take some pics of the complete bike.

    Next up: "First Ride and Requisite Bike Pr0n"
    Last edited by Opus51569; 03-28-2014 at 06:31 PM.
    Nothing in all the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity. - MLK

  6. #6
    T K
    T K is offline
    wasssabi
    Reputation: T K's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    2,029
    Congrats on the new bike! Looking to treat myself to a new ti or steel bike in two years. A Lynskey Peloton is on the list. Can't wait to hear your review and feast on some new bike porn.

  7. #7
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    2,503
    Looking good, hope the weather is great for your first Saturday with the new ride.

  8. #8
    What the what???
    Reputation: Opus51569's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    7,620

    The Lynskey Peloton

    Still waiting for the thermometer to get above freezing. Man, what a winter...

    Light enough outside, though, to snap a few pics

    The Lynskey Peloton-imageuploadedbytapatalk1396101471.446136.jpg

    The specs:

    Lynskey Peloton frame ML (56cm)
    Lynskey Sport carbon fork
    Cane Creek 110 headset
    Torelli stem (35 degree, 90mm)
    FSA Omega bars (44cm)
    SRAM Apex group (white) - brakes, levers, front derailleur, rear derailleur (WiFli), crankset (50/34, 172.5), cassette (12-32)
    MKS Lambda platform pedals
    Thompson Elite seatpost
    Brooks B-17 saddle
    Fulcrum 5 wheels/hubs (20/24)
    Ruffy Tuffy tires (28c)

    This will be my first experience with SRAM. I'm used to 105. I hope I don't accidentally snap off the brake lever trying to shift... The Apex was a compromise due mostly to budget but I like the gear range. No mountains here, but we do get headwinds that will suck the life out of you. Also, the white was a nice alternative to the typical black or silver.

    The Lynskey Peloton-imageuploadedbytapatalk1396102602.647103.jpg

    No. It's not a race bike, but that was never the intent. Compared to what I'm used to, though, it is ridiculously light.

    The Lynskey Peloton-imageuploadedbytapatalk1396102629.331731.jpg

    Better pics to follow, along with a ride report as I start to dial in the fit.
    Last edited by Opus51569; 03-29-2014 at 09:51 AM.
    Nothing in all the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity. - MLK

  9. #9
    T K
    T K is offline
    wasssabi
    Reputation: T K's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    2,029
    Looking good. I'm curious what made you choose the Peloton over the other models?

  10. #10
    What the what???
    Reputation: Opus51569's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    7,620

    The Lynskey Peloton

    Quote Originally Posted by T K View Post
    Looking good. I'm curious what made you choose the Peloton over the other models?
    Of the Lynskey models in my price range, the Peloton was a little more relaxed than the Roleur. The Roleur is more of a traditional race geometry. Adrenaline also carries Litespeed, but the T7 starts at $1299, as opposed to $1168 for the Peloton.
    Nothing in all the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity. - MLK

  11. #11
    What the what???
    Reputation: Opus51569's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    7,620

    The Lynskey Peloton

    With multitool in hand, I set out on the ride. The goal was to get a feel for the bike, adjust to the SRAM shifters, and see what fit adjustments I need to make.

    As a rider, it's important to note that the word "hammer" is not in my vocabulary. I prefer to go farther, easier. I have heard a number of people laud the ride quality of titanium and that, along with its durability, is a big part of what made me look for an affordable titanium bike.

    At the start of the ride, I wouldn't say I was disappointed, but I think I was expecting a significantly different feel from the steel bikes I've ridden (I've never tried a carbon bike). Don't get me wrong, the ride was very comfortable, just not remarkably different from what I was used to. Then, I got to my first hill and got out of the saddle for the first time. Wow! Now that was different. It was a wonderful combination of stiff, smooth and light. The lighter weight and relative lack of flex made more of my effort feel like it was going straight to the wheels. The overall impression I got was that the bike had all of the positive qualities of steel, with none of the drawbacks.

    The SRAM shifters proved to be easier to use than I expected. I just had to keep reminding myself to push through the first click to downshift. Shifts were crisp even under load. Braking was very good, which was a pleasant surprise. I've gotten used to swapping out OEM pads with KoolStop salmons, but the stock pads seem fine.

    I did notice a bit of chain rub on the front derailleur cage. The derailleur needed a minor adjustment when I got home. The cage wasn't quite parallel with the chainring. The stem was just a little out of alignment as well. No biggie.

    The wheels will be my biggest worry. The Fulcrum 5s look nice. They spun true and easy out of the box. I heard no spoke ping during the ride, which suggests to me that the wheels were properly tensioned and relieved. But with my weight and the low spoke count, I'd be lying if I said I didn't cringe a bit with each bump, waiting to hear the sound of a spoke popping. That said, the ride included rolling over two sets of train tracks and a short section on a bumpy dirt road.

    I'm glad I knew my fit preferences well enough to swap out the parts I needed. I know some folks like to make fun of the "high rise" stem, but it (plus 40mm of headset spacers which I was also able to specify) put the bars level with the saddle, just where I like it. The zero setback seatpost also works for my purposes. The bars may need to be tilted down just a bit. The hoods on the Apex shifters are thick and sit above the bars more than I'm used to with 105s. But I'm going to give it a few more rides to make sure. The levers have a shorter reach, though, which I like. It's just the first ride. I've learned to be patient and not try to adjust too much, too soon.

    Overall, for a complete titanium bike under 3K, I think I chose wisely.

    The Lynskey Peloton-imageuploadedbytapatalk1396118710.910814.jpg

    The first voyage out into the wild...
    Last edited by Opus51569; 03-31-2014 at 04:44 AM.
    Nothing in all the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity. - MLK

  12. #12
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    2,503
    Good to hear things worked out and you are happy with the ride.
    The weather will no doubt be getting better in your area shortly and you will be racking up the miles.

  13. #13
    What the what???
    Reputation: Opus51569's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    7,620

    The Lynskey Peloton

    A few photos for anyone curious about what the bike looks like up close:

    The Lynskey Peloton-imageuploadedbytapatalk1396191490.154962.jpg

    The Lynskey Peloton-imageuploadedbytapatalk1396191509.513417.jpg

    The Lynskey Peloton-imageuploadedbytapatalk1396191525.278483.jpg

    The Lynskey Peloton-imageuploadedbytapatalk1396191557.380658.jpg

    I'm certainly no expert, but the welds look clean.

    I did have a few questions. In the pic below there is a noticeable gap between the top of the fork and the lower crown race:

    The Lynskey Peloton-imageuploadedbytapatalk1396191721.298865.jpg

    I'm assuming this is normal, but I have seen forks where this gap is covered by a rubber gasket presumably to keep dirt and water out.

    The other question is about the wheels:

    The Lynskey Peloton-imageuploadedbytapatalk1396191860.859997.jpg

    It's a little hard to see, but on both the front and rear wheels, the spokes adjacent to the valve stem are stainless steel and feel thicker than the rest of the black spokes. Is this a design feature for Fulcrums?

    The Lynskey Peloton-imageuploadedbytapatalk1396192000.868731.jpg

    The Lynskey Peloton-imageuploadedbytapatalk1396192018.945544.jpg

    It's just a sticker, but I thought the signature was a nice touch.

    The Lynskey Peloton-imageuploadedbytapatalk1396192072.024589.jpg

    The Lynskey Peloton-imageuploadedbytapatalk1396192088.021860.jpg
    Nothing in all the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity. - MLK

  14. #14
    What the what???
    Reputation: Opus51569's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    7,620
    Thanks, everyone for the well wishes. Work is about to shift into 14 hour/day mode for a while. But, I will post updates as I put more miles on the bike.
    Nothing in all the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity. - MLK

  15. #15
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    2,503
    The fork is normal, it's a "generic" fork fitted to a headset. No idea about the spokes.
    In regards to the name on the frame, it's always been a good sign for me to have someone put their own name on their product.

  16. #16
    What the what???
    Reputation: Opus51569's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    7,620

    The Lynskey Peloton

    Quote Originally Posted by mikerp View Post
    The fork is normal, it's a "generic" fork fitted to a headset. No idea about the spokes.
    In regards to the name on the frame, it's always been a good sign for me to have someone put their own name on their product.
    I did a little digging, and it may be that the two spokes are meant to balance out the seam on the opposite side of the rim. Fulcrum has a term for it (of course), "Dynamic Balance".
    Last edited by Opus51569; 03-31-2014 at 05:04 AM.
    Nothing in all the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity. - MLK

  17. #17
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    922
    The fork kinda looks like it could be designed for use in an integrated setup or non-integrated setup. Of course using it as a non-integrated would produce that little gap.

  18. #18
    pmf
    pmf is offline
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    4,144
    I have a Litespeed made by Lynskey when he owned Litespeed (mine is a 1999). They're good, well made bikes. You'll get a lot of use out of that bike. I have three road bikes and ride the Litespeed about 50% of the time. It's kind of my go to bike.

    Not so sure I'm digging the white components. But its a done deal. Maybe white bar tape would help.

  19. #19
    What the what???
    Reputation: Opus51569's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    7,620

    The Lynskey Peloton

    If I swap the tape, though, I'll incur the wrath of the "saddle must match the tape" gang. And they're a mean bunch.

    Seriously, though...

    The white is definitely different. I wasn't sure about it at first, but I thought it would be a nice change from the usual black and silver options. Yeah, it's going to get dirty quickly, but I treat bikes pretty well, so hopefully it won't be an issue.

    At some point down the road, when it's time for new cables and housing, I'll likely swap those to white. I'm not sure about the tape yet.
    Last edited by Opus51569; 03-31-2014 at 02:17 PM.
    Nothing in all the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity. - MLK

  20. #20
    Re-Cyclist
    Reputation: Special Eyes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    1,559
    Nice bike, but way TMI. However, the pic of the box and the bike in bubble wrap is inspiring.
    Santa Barbara, CA -- My Photo Site -- My Business Site

  21. #21
    WA outdoor enthusiast
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    1,236
    Looks to me like you need a bike with a taller head tube, or the next bigger frame size. Just sayin. Do the 28s fit with adequate clearance?

  22. #22
    What the what???
    Reputation: Opus51569's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    7,620

    The Lynskey Peloton

    Quote Originally Posted by SantaCruz View Post
    Looks to me like you need a bike with a taller head tube, or the next bigger frame size. Just sayin. Do the 28s fit with adequate clearance?
    A taller head tube would be nice, but a larger frame would also mean a longer top and seat tube. I'd need a shorter stem to get the same reach and the saddle would have to drop and shift further forward. To get one frame that fit all my needs, I'd have to go with a custom frame build.

    The 28s have okay clearance. I don't think I could go any bigger, though.

    I took a few pics up close



    The rear might have clearance for something slightly larger



    The front... not so much.
    Last edited by Opus51569; 04-05-2014 at 01:39 PM.
    Nothing in all the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity. - MLK

  23. #23
    What the what???
    Reputation: Opus51569's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    7,620

    The Lynskey Peloton

    A beautiful morning. Low 60s and partly sunny. So, out I went for a nice 24 mile out-and-back.

    I'm still adjusting the fit, but it's minor little details now. Reassuring to know that the M/L frame was the right choice for me.

    I'm appreciating the Apex group more and more, particularly the rear derailleur shifting. The double-tap makes moving up the cassette very smooth even under load. With the 105 I'm used to, I would have to relieve stress on the drivetrain to get a clean shift.

    I have made one alteration. I swapped out the 50t ring for a Stronglight 46t from the parts bin.

    The ride continues to be comfortable. I don't think I'm particularly faster, but I don't seem to fatigue as quickly.

    The Fulcrums are fine thus far. The ride today included a 30mph downhill with some serious seams in the pavement. I also discovered that the two stainless spokes provide a good place to put the spoke magnet.

    Thunderstorms tonight... snow tomorrow.
    Last edited by Opus51569; 04-13-2014 at 01:44 PM.
    Nothing in all the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity. - MLK

  24. #24
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    525
    Personally I wouldn't be happy with the front tyre clearance.
    It might be ok so long as your wheel a perfectly true.

    If your miles from home and it goes off for some reason you might be getting a taxi home.
    Nice bike though. I have Litespeed Icon. Brilliant bike.
    Litespeed Icon
    Ultegra SL
    Dura Ace Crank
    Mavic Ksyrium Elite 2013 WTS 2013
    Mavic CXP33 Ultegra
    Mavic Open Pro Dura Ace


    Bianchi Sempre
    Ultegra
    SLK Carbon Crank
    Deda bars and stem
    Mavic Ksyrium Elite WTS 2013

  25. #25
    What the what???
    Reputation: Opus51569's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    7,620
    Quote Originally Posted by giosblue View Post
    Personally I wouldn't be happy with the front tyre clearance.
    It might be ok so long as your wheel a perfectly true.

    If your miles from home and it goes off for some reason you might be getting a taxi home.
    Nice bike though. I have Litespeed Icon. Brilliant bike.
    I know tire sizes differ by manufacturer, but I'm taking Lynskey at their word when they say:

    • Easily accommodates up to 700x28c tires

    But, with the low spoke count and my weight, I have already mentally prepared myself for the day when a spoke pops and I have to call my wife for a ride home. And I've started a new wheel fund.

    It happened once before with a rear wheel on an older bike with 24 spokes. A spoke broke and the rim immediately went so far out of true that even opening the brake calipers wouldn't give enough clearance. It ended up causing a hop in the rim that neither I, nor the LBS, could get out.
    Last edited by Opus51569; 04-14-2014 at 01:32 PM.
    Nothing in all the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity. - MLK

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Welcome to the Peloton??!!??
    By AndyP. in forum Retro-Classic
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 04-13-2012, 04:43 PM
  2. Beyond the peloton
    By Keski in forum Pro Cycling - Tour de France
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 06-09-2011, 09:52 AM
  3. If the peloton had no reason . . .
    By obfg in forum Pro Cycling - Tour de France
    Replies: 32
    Last Post: 07-18-2009, 12:56 AM
  4. Any Ti in the Peloton?
    By TyboTy in forum Pro Cycling - Tour de France
    Replies: 38
    Last Post: 07-17-2006, 06:11 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •