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  1. #1
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    Madone vs Team Soloist aero position for TT

    I'm looking for some opinions on the differences between these two frame geometries with regard to achieving a respectable time trial aero position with a slack seat tube angle.

    What is it about the Soloist that is supposed to make it more adept for time trialing? Both frame geometries (56cm) have very similar head tube and seat tube angles. Top tube lengths are similar as well.

    Is the Cervelo reversible seatpost just marketing hype? How is that different than sliding a Madone seat forward to acheive the same steeper angle?

    I'm currently riding a 56cm Trek 1000 and looking to upgrade to a more serious racing bike (70% group/road riding, 30% time trialing).

    Thanks!

  2. #2
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    Road geometries in TT mode revisited

    I haven't been getting much help on this question on other forums either... turns into a Trek vs. Cervelo debate... which isn't really the issue.

    The question was more about road geometries, not necessarily specific bike make. The Madone and Soloist are two under consideration at the LBS (though the Soloist hasn't arrived for a test ride yet).

    If my saddle is currently 6cm behind the bottom bracket, then a steeper (i.e., saddle forward) "aero" angle on either of these bikes would probably break the "saddle 5cm behind the bb " UCI rule for racing, no?

    I have read almost everything there is to read on the Soloists. It's all interesting enough, but it doesn't really say what "geometry tricks" Cervelo uses to eliminate a front weight bias in a TT position.

    Any thoughts?

  3. #3
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    Reputation: atpjunkie's Avatar
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    the Cervelo

    has the ability to move the seat far forward into more of a TT position. The Cervelo posts change the ST angle. It will break the ole 5c rule but this is very common in TT bikes. TT bikes are front loaded, it's why even the pros crash on them, they don't handle very well. IMHO (and I own neither brand so I'm not part of the debate) if you want a bike that can 'do both' I'd get the Soloist. It is more aero and has the ability to alter the rider position into a TT position far better than the Trek
    one nation, under surveillance with liberty and justice for few

    still not figgering on biggering

  4. #4
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    I have never ridden a Madone, but I do have a Soloist and with the seat in the TT position the bike is very comfortable for TT's. I believe it gives you close to a 74 or 75 degree seat tube angle wich is closer to a TT bike. I used my Lemond Buenos Aires for a TT previous to the solist and the comfort level was night and day when I switched to the Cervelo.

  5. #5
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    For the 70% of the time you'll be riding on the road, vs the 30% for the TT. I would suggest you go for a Road bike.

  6. #6
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    yer missing the point Madone

    with the Cervelo and a set of clip on TT bars the rider can switch between both disciplines in about 15 minutes. The Soloist is a raod bike that can quickly be altered to do TT duty.
    one nation, under surveillance with liberty and justice for few

    still not figgering on biggering

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