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  1. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by Slow Ride View Post
    The Roadie rides and feels best on fast rides. At 10 to 15 mph it transmits a lot of vibration. But above that it goes away and it morphs into the great-handling sports car. The LeMond transmits much less vibration on those slower rides.

    Thanks.
    You have hit on something I noticed when I first got my Roadie, but since have gotten used to. Yes, below around 15 mph, if you pay attention, it just seems a bit coarse, I do mean just a bit. Especially when tires are inflated near the upper end of the psi range. Once you get just a bit more speed it seems like the vibration goes away, or gets into some kind of synchrony or something as you don't seem to feel it anymore.

    Aluminum bikes (I have only owned a couple, so maybe not generic to them) seem to have this larger amounts of this vibration (more a buzz), and it doesn't seem to go away at any speed. Carbon bikes I have ridden seem to soak up this buzz. Now on coarse pavement and high tire pressure they can transmit a bit of the road buzz, but seem to soak it up mostly somehow without feeling at all deadened. Yes, I know it is stereotypical description of the frame types, and maybe I was just preconditioned to experience them this way. But it seems to be so.

    Now if the Roadie is a Corvette (I don't disagree with that sports car assessment) I have a Bianchi 928 that must be a McLaren. As it is even sportier, snappier etc. It is a touch smaller frame and I wish it were the next size up, so that might have something to do with it. All things considered I still like the Roadie better.

  2. #52
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    Amazing bike!

  3. #53
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    Hello, I am saving up for a road bike, before I found Gunnar road bikes I was saving up for a modest £500 bike. But i'm thinking is it worth waiting longer for a nicer bike which also happens to have my name on? What do you think?

  4. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by gunnarjford View Post
    Hello, I am saving up for a road bike, before I found Gunnar road bikes I was saving up for a modest £500 bike. But i'm thinking is it worth waiting longer for a nicer bike which also happens to have my name on? What do you think?
    I would, in a heartbeat. I've had 2 Roadies and a Sport. (One Roadie was SUV-demolished.) All have been great bikes. I don't honestly think you would be anything but very happy with one.

    I posted a picture of my Roadie before -- here's one of the Sport.

    New Gunnar Roadie-dsc02540.jpg
    Seven Elium Race, Gunnar Roadie, Surly LHT, Gary Fisher Genesis 2,
    Miyata 610, Gunnar Sport

  5. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by gunnarjford View Post
    Hello, I am saving up for a road bike, before I found Gunnar road bikes I was saving up for a modest £500 bike. But i'm thinking is it worth waiting longer for a nicer bike which also happens to have my name on? What do you think?
    Hi Gunnar
    My wife and I have had Gunnar Sports for nearly 12 years now. She loves riding a bike, though just with me and there better be a coffee shop at the halfway point, but she loves her Gunnar and refuses to entertain the idea of having anything else. A while back, she did try a carbon Trek after some considerable research. It lasted around six months of her muttering about it, was sold and she's sticking with her Sport. Mine - okay, I'm past going far or fast now, but a few years back, I actually rode a criterium on mine - I'm a 'former racer' from a long while back. Short answer - I reckon the Sport is the overall best handling bike I've ever owned.

    That you get your name on the frame for 'free' is really neat!

    Ours have both been re-painted - it's a 'treat' you can give yourself with a steel frame. Mine, now tasteful blue with white panels used to be a red into yellow fade that demanded sunglasses at close quarters. Hers was a pale metallic flake blue, now a dark purple-ish colour that matches her favourite nail polish colour she uses on her toes. Go figure that one!

    Definitely start saving for that Gunnar!

    Good luck

    Dereck
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails New Gunnar Roadie-dereck-gunnar-2010-sm.jpg   New Gunnar Roadie-sue-gunnar-1-2010.jpg  

  6. #56
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    Here's a shot of my Gunnar Sport. Not the greatest photo, but you get the gist. It's sort of a Guinness black-and-tan scheme. I'm still getting used to the bike. It's a stiffer frame than I would have expected, and rides harsher than my other steel bikes. I just swapped the tires from 25s to 28s to see if that will help. I'm using it mainly for commuting, hence the fenders and Bagman rack.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails New Gunnar Roadie-gunnar-sport-1.jpg  

  7. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by tarwheel2 View Post
    Here's a shot of my Gunnar Sport. Not the greatest photo, but you get the gist. It's sort of a Guinness black-and-tan scheme. I'm still getting used to the bike. It's a stiffer frame than I would have expected, and rides harsher than my other steel bikes. I just swapped the tires from 25s to 28s to see if that will help. I'm using it mainly for commuting, hence the fenders and Bagman rack.
    I'm surprised you say it rides harsher. I've had 2 Roadie's and a Sport and I've been quite happy with the quality of the ride. I wonder, did you use the Gunnar fork?
    Seven Elium Race, Gunnar Roadie, Surly LHT, Gary Fisher Genesis 2,
    Miyata 610, Gunnar Sport

  8. #58
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    Looks nice. First time I've seen a powertap wheel used on a Gunnar

  9. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by chrisclougherty View Post
    I'm surprised you say it rides harsher. I've had 2 Roadie's and a Sport and I've been quite happy with the quality of the ride. I wonder, did you use the Gunnar fork?
    Actually, my Sport has a Waterford steel fork, so that is not the cause of the harsher ride. I think it's the tubing, which is oversized. I have three other steel bikes, and the Gunnar's tubing is huge compared to them.

    I have a Waterford RST-22 that is about the same size and geometry but has narrower tubing, and it rides like a magic carpet. My Gunnar rides much better now that I have put 28 mm tires on it. However, I expected it to ride just like the Waterford and it does not. The Gunnar's ride is much stiffer than the Waterford.

  10. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by tarwheel2 View Post
    Actually, my Sport has a Waterford steel fork, so that is not the cause of the harsher ride. I think it's the tubing, which is oversized. I have three other steel bikes, and the Gunnar's tubing is huge compared to them.

    I have a Waterford RST-22 that is about the same size and geometry but has narrower tubing, and it rides like a magic carpet. My Gunnar rides much better now that I have put 28 mm tires on it. However, I expected it to ride just like the Waterford and it does not. The Gunnar's ride is much stiffer than the Waterford.
    One reason for the difference you perceive is that the Roadie and the RST-22 are not really as comparable frames as you may think. The "ST" in your frame designation stands for Sport Touring. This is how Waterford describes your bike:

    "The ST-22 is perfect for long-distance riding in comfort with its long wheelbase, light tubeset and stable steering geometry. 57mm brakes give you a clean road look with the ability to fit fenders and larger (up to 32C tires). Using proven long distance handling, lightweight tubing, the Sport Touring platform offers great comfort and easy handling.


    Designed for comfort and stability over long distances, this is the choice for pure century riders and those who enjoy credit card and other forms of light touring. The long wheelbase provides excellent vertical compliance, while the steering makes the bike feel like it steers itself, so the rider can enjoy the full riding experience."

    The Roadie is actually modeled after a racing bike (a stage racing bike to be more precise). The Gunnar that would be closer to your to your RST-22 would be the Gunnar Sport.

    This is how Gunnar describes the Sport:

    "For some people, itís more about miles than it is the miles per hour. Yet they still want the lightness and performance of a great steel bike. This is where the Sport shines. Its upright riding position, longer wheelbase and more stable steering makes the miles a pleasure to savor. And when the weather deteriorates, youíre ready, thanks to our 57mm reach brake design that provides you room for fenders and 28C tires." (Also, like the RST-22,the Sport takes 57mm brakes and 32c tires (if you don't add fenders).)

    All that said, however, both are great bikes. I hope you have many happy miles on each of them.
    Seven Elium Race, Gunnar Roadie, Surly LHT, Gary Fisher Genesis 2,
    Miyata 610, Gunnar Sport

  11. #61
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    Chris - You misunderstood me or I wasn't clear. I have a Waterford RST as well as a Gunnar Sport (not Roadie). The Gunnar Sport and the Waterford RST are both described as sport touring frames, yet the RST rides much smoother. As I said, I think the tubing accounts for the difference. The Sport's tubing is much larger diameter than the RST. Both frames have long chain stays and both have steel Waterford forks, and both frames are about the same size (although the Sport is a compact design and the RST has a slightly sloping top tube).

  12. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by tarwheel2 View Post
    Chris - You misunderstood me or I wasn't clear. I have a Waterford RST as well as a Gunnar Sport (not Roadie). The Gunnar Sport and the Waterford RST are both described as sport touring frames, yet the RST rides much smoother. As I said, I think the tubing accounts for the difference. The Sport's tubing is much larger diameter than the RST. Both frames have long chain stays and both have steel Waterford forks, and both frames are about the same size (although the Sport is a compact design and the RST has a slightly sloping top tube).
    My apologies, tarwheel2. You were perfectly clear, I just messed up. For some reason I must have been thinking of drmayer's quote about his Roadie, which started this thread.

    I take back what I said, totally mistaken.

    I do have one other question about the Sport. You say you have a Waterford fork on it, I think. I was wondering if you know what fork it is, and also wondering if the fork rake is the same they recommend for the Sport?

    Since you discuss the ride as being smoother, one other thing occurs to me. Waterford had the RS (Road Sport) and the RST (Road Sport Touring) models. I haven't looked at those geometries closely in comparision to the Sport, but it may be possible that the RS is closer to the Sport. And that the more comfy aspect of the RST you feel might be attributable to it having a bit more of the touring geometry in it. But, I don't know.

    But the tubing no doubt has an influence.

    And, as I said, sorry for misreading your post earler.
    Seven Elium Race, Gunnar Roadie, Surly LHT, Gary Fisher Genesis 2,
    Miyata 610, Gunnar Sport

  13. #63
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    Which Brooks saddle is that? Looks nice. Does it feel as good as it looks?

  14. #64
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    I bought both my Waterford RST and Gunnar Sport used, and both were custom to some extent. The Waterford is fully custom and has a taller head tube, a low bottom bracket, cantilever brakes and clearance for larger tires -- all features that don't match the standard specs for their sport touring frames. The Gunnar Sport is a standard size 60 frame, but the original owner paid extra for a Waterford fork. Since he bought directly from Gunnar, I assume that they correctly matched the fork to his frame. Regardless, the stiffness of the frame does not seem to relate to the fork. It is similar in shape and tubing size to the fork on my Waterford RST.

    The tubing on my Gunnar Sport frame is considerable larger diameter than the Waterford. I have owned other frames in the past with oversized tubing, and they ride stiffer. Some people like that feature, but I personally prefer a smoother riding frame. However, with larger tires the Gunnar rides just fine and it has enough clearance to run tires at least up to 32 mm.

  15. #65
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    Love this paint scheme. What is it? Sterling silver to pace car blue?
    Gonna order my frame very soon.

  16. #66
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    Thread resurrection.

    Here's my not-quite-so new Roadie. Minimal Gunnar logos ("G" on the headtube), charcoal silver paint, ENVE 2.0, 6700 everything except 105 brakes. Wheels are CK R45 with DT Swiss RR415. Bars are Bontrager Race Lite Aero. Almost everything else is temporary. I get a lot of people asking me if it is titanium. Somewhere around 18lbs 15oz.

    Good to join the Gunnar club.

    New Gunnar Roadie-img_20131128_094017e75.jpg

    edit: Size is a 58. I'll cut the steerer eventually.
    Last edited by roadie09; 12-03-2013 at 09:56 PM.

  17. #67
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    New Gunnar Roadie-gunnar.jpg

    enjoy!

  18. #68
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    New Gunnar Roadie-gunnar.jpg

  19. #69
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    I have a Gunnar Sport and a Moots Vamoots, both 56cm. The 2010 Vamoots has a slightly longer wheelbase and a few other changes from previous years. Good combination of stability and responsiveness. The Sport is actually a little quicker feeling (not necessarily faster). It transmits more road feel as you might expect, and is very enjoyable to ride. Have not done any long rides yet as it is fairly new, and is my commute / winter bike. Both enjoyable rides. I ended up liking the Sport much more than I expected. If it was my only bike, I could live with that. The Vamoots is also a wonderful bike.
    New Gunnar Roadie-gunnarsport1.jpg

  20. #70
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    2008 Gunnar Roadie

    Had my Gunnar Roadie since 2008 after riding a Felt carbon frame. I recently rode a Moots Vamoots CR and while its the nicest bike I've ever had the pleasure to ride, the Gunnar is right up there. For the money it's a no brainer......

    Titanium to charcoal fade paint with Easton EC90 SLX fork, Ultegra shifters & drivetrain, Ultegra 6800 wheelset, DuraAce derailleurs, FSA crankset & Superpro Chainrings. Have not weighed it but likely somewhere around 18.5 lbs with pedals and cages. Ride is sublime, could not want for much more.

    New Gunnar Roadie-img_6328.jpgNew Gunnar Roadie-img_6339.jpgNew Gunnar Roadie-img_6313.jpg
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails New Gunnar Roadie-img_6325.jpg  

  21. #71
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    Very nice. Curious what you think of the ride quality of ec90slx fork? I had one on my Gunnar & ended up switching to a heavier fork that would fit 28mm tires.

  22. #72
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    Think the fork rides quite nice, no issues or complaints. Other than my wife's ec90 superlight and various other factory carbon forks, I really have not ridden a lot of other forks though.

  23. #73
    RCR
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    I am 5"10 and considering a Gunnar Roadie. Am little confused about the 54 and 56. I currently ride a 54 Cross Check and I feel the reach is a bit too much, hence I have put a shorter stem. Effective Top Tube on a Roadie 54 is 55cm and looks just perfect for me. However the standover height on a roadie is 30.20cm compared to 31.22cm on a Cross Check. My inseam is 33.5, do you think it will be too much of a concern?

    Thanks in advance.

  24. #74
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    That's a tough one. You must have long legs and a short torso?

    it depends on your reach and your flexibility. What is the ETT of the Cross Check?

    I think the best thing to do is reach out to Waterford and talk to them about the fit, your build, flexibility etc.

    Quote Originally Posted by RCR View Post
    I am 5"10 and considering a Gunnar Roadie. Am little confused about the 54 and 56. I currently ride a 54 Cross Check and I feel the reach is a bit too much, hence I have put a shorter stem. Effective Top Tube on a Roadie 54 is 55cm and looks just perfect for me. However the standover height on a roadie is 30.20cm compared to 31.22cm on a Cross Check. My inseam is 33.5, do you think it will be too much of a concern?

    Thanks in advance.

  25. #75
    RCR
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vitamin G View Post
    That's a tough one. You must have long legs and a short torso?

    it depends on your reach and your flexibility. What is the ETT of the Cross Check?

    I think the best thing to do is reach out to Waterford and talk to them about the fit, your build, flexibility etc.
    ETT on my Cross Check is 56.

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