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  1. #1
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    new material for bike frames?

    "The next generation of carbon"

    https://rein4ced.com/

  2. #2
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    interesting! Using steel fibers to strengthen impact resistance. Weren't they using kevlar before in this endeavor? at least the Pinarello PR literature was making a big stink about kevlar.

    Website also states that weight will remain the same. Well some material engineer correct me here, but if steel is heavier than CF, and if you sub some CF for some steel strands, then how is the final weight the same?? makes no sense to me. But regardless, I reckon any weight gain probably won't be that much nor that important for 99% of the cyclists, save for the most anal of the weighweenies.

    since the new material behaves like steel in some regards, i wonder if the bicycle frame will too now ride and feel like a steel frame? i.e., supple and compliant.

    This is good progress. Next up, sub all CF for steel and we're back to a steel bike

  3. #3
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    I thought that maybe they were going to weave some spider webbing into the carbon.
    Too old to ride plastic

  4. #4
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    Is impact resistant carbon really an unsolved problem? I know a of bike makers don't use carbon that can take a bang but I'm pretty sure that's not because it doesn't exist. As a hockey player that's used carbon sticks I can say for sure carbon that can take a pretty good hit has been around for quite a while.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Strongbow View Post
    Is impact resistant carbon really an unsolved problem? I know a of bike makers don't use carbon that can take a bang but I'm pretty sure that's not because it doesn't exist. As a hockey player that's used carbon sticks I can say for sure carbon that can take a pretty good hit has been around for quite a while.
    your carbon fiber hockey stick probably isn't made as thin as bicycle tubing and it's probably not using the hi-mod CF stuff, and futhermore it's probably got some other materials like kevlar and/or fiberglass mixed into it.

    but I'm wondering why can't they use the lower mod CF (more impact resistant) to bike frames, throw in some kevlar, and make the tube wall a tad thicker, then problem solved as far as impact resistance goes? No need for be fancy. But I reckon a frame made this way is gonna be anywhere from 1100 - 1300 grams, which heaven forbids it's the end of the world for the weightweenies.

  6. #6
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    what engineering problem is being solved here?

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trek_5200 View Post
    what engineering problem is being solved here?
    production can be automated, meaning not much human labor, which means production could potentially be brought to Europe or America (due to little labor cost involved), all this means higher QA process. That is worth something.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by aclinjury View Post
    production can be automated, meaning not much human labor, which means production could potentially be brought to Europe or America, which usually (not always) lead to higher QA process. That is worth something.
    got it , it saves on production costs. so we're not talking about a better road bike but rather superior cost margins for builders and 'maybe' lower prices for consumers

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trek_5200 View Post
    what engineering problem is being solved here?
    Filling their wallets.
    Too old to ride plastic

  10. #10
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    Well, the maker is claiming that using reinforced fabric will allow for less labor intensive layups, but it really doesn't work that way.

    This stuff doesn't make CF more immune to impacts, it just makes impact failures less dramatic. It essentially seems to increase the plastic fatigue of the material, not the actual strength in preventing damage.

    Bikes don't get damaged because carbon fiber is easy to damage, but because cutting edge bikes have walls that are too thin to decrease weight at a given stiffness. I think what they are trying to do is make those flimsy thin sections less likely to propagate into full on cracks when dinged - but how many of us are going to keep riding an obviously dinged bike of any thin walled material?
    Get a better saddle: www.kontactbike.com

  11. #11
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    https://youtu.be/uiZqERJqr-g?t=4m6s

    Innegra is for this type of stuff.
    use a torque wrench

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trek_5200 View Post
    got it , it saves on production costs. so we're not talking about a better road bike but rather superior cost margins for builders and 'maybe' lower prices for consumers
    with steel strands, the bike can now trigger magnetic sensor. Big plus

  13. #13
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    Carbon? When you look at just the cost it is bad, but it is even worse when you look at the degree of performance plus comfort difference between current carbon and aluminum. I think carbon is the biggest ripoff in the history of road bikes. WAY, way overpriced for what you get IMO.

    Anything that will reduce the situation described above I'm for it.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by aclinjury View Post
    interesting! Using steel fibers to strengthen impact resistance. Weren't they using kevlar before in this endeavor? at least the Pinarello PR literature was making a big stink about kevlar.

    Website also states that weight will remain the same. Well some material engineer correct me here, but if steel is heavier than CF, and if you sub some CF for some steel strands, then how is the final weight the same?? makes no sense to me. But regardless, I reckon any weight gain probably won't be that much nor that important for 99% of the cyclists, save for the most anal of the weighweenies.

    since the new material behaves like steel in some regards, i wonder if the bicycle frame will too now ride and feel like a steel frame? i.e., supple and compliant.

    This is good progress. Next up, sub all CF for steel and we're back to a steel bike
    I was thinking the exact same thing!

  15. #15
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    Great work.

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