Page 14 of 15 FirstFirst ... 12131415 LastLast
Results 326 to 350 of 362
  1. #326
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: velodog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    5,939
    Quote Originally Posted by Migen21 View Post
    I have no idea what anything is worth to someone else, or even if you need something other than a stock geometry.

    All I know is that, as custom geometry offerings go, their prices are very reasonable. It's only a few hundred dollars more for this service. For other small mark ups, they offer additional bosses and other features. Things you could never get on most of the bikes mentioned in this thread.

    Lastly, I'm just providing some info as possible options for someone who may be considering a Quiver Killer. Steel appeals to some. Custom and options appeal to some. Custom colors and finish options appeals to some. Made in the USA appeals to some. They offer all of these things at a reasonable price.

    I've never owned a Gunnar, but I did consider it at one point a few years ago. If I had needed a custom geometry steel bike, they (or Waterford) would have been my choice.
    And if you did some research it would be found that Waterford builds the frames for other brands.

    My Boulder All Road is was built by Waterford and to my understanding many Rivendells are built by Waterford. A little looking would probably bring others to light.
    Too old to ride plastic

  2. #327
    Crank Addict
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Posts
    1,850
    Quote Originally Posted by Rashadabd View Post
    Very cool. Thanks for sharing Rich. Update us if you get to take one out for a test ride.
    Yes... supposedly there's a demo thing coming up and I'm hoping to jump in on it.
    ___________________________
    2016 Pactimo Brand Ambassador

    www.Crankaddicts.cc

    www.skratchlabs.com
    www.hilltopbicycles.com

    2015 S-Works DSW Allez
    2015 Specialized Venge Pro
    2016 Specialized Fatboy Comp

  3. #328
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Posts
    2
    Hi guys, first time poster, so here goes:
    I love the concept of a quiver killer bike. Of course, within the category there is a spectrum - some bikes are more suited for the road and others lean more towards the gravel/off road persuasion. For me, I like riding centuries and long climbs, and supplement with fast, short rides on weeknights. All riding is on pavement, but sometimes it can be quite rough with exposed aggregate and cracks galore. Based upon that, I've been searching for a quiver killer that leans towards the road end of things.

    With that in mind, I'd like to give a shout out to my new quiver killer, the Diamondback Century 5 Carbon. It clears 32mm tires, is built up with quality components, and is competitively priced.

    DB is off most people's radar due to its rep as a "walmart bike", but I really think people should keep it in mind as an option. The bikes can be found on sale for great deals, and the builds are on par with most other major brands.

    I just received mine in the mail the other day, and have two rides totaling 50 miles. Thus far I am really impressed. The bike came boxed but mostly assembled, and it seems the factory did a good job (wheels true, fasteners properly torqued, etc). The wheelset is very nice (they are listed as HED flanders, but they are really just a rebadged ardennes, measuring 21mm internal and 26mm external). The rest of the bike is full ultegra with hydraulic disc brakes, and came dialed in (just had to mess with the cable tension a tiny bit). The stock prologo saddle seems quite comfy as well.

    The only changes I have made are swapping for a thomson 0 offset post (due to my personal geometry needs) and changing to Continental GP4000s II 28c tires (which, btw, measure out to 32.5 mm wide!).

    The frame stiffness is adequate to prevent chainrub while sprinting (and I weigh ~195 lbs), and the larger tires provide lots of comfort while still rolling fast.

    The best way to describe the handling is 'accurate' - it goes right where you point it. It does not feel racy like a bike with a steep head tube that is so eager to turn, yet it does not feel sluggish at all. For me, the handling is 'just right'.

    FYI I purchased a 56cm frame, but am 6'3". I am the classic "long legged, short torso" type of guy. Conventional wisdom would suggest I buy a 58 or a 60, but the the 56 is perfect for me! Be sure to work with a bike fitter before you buy!

    Let me know if you guys have further questions - I decided to post here because this thread brought me a lot of inspiration while choosing my newest bike. So I hope I can perpetuate the bike stoke!

    Ready to ride:


    Rear tire clearance at the seat stays:


    Rear tire clearance at the chain stays:


    Front tire clearance:

  4. #329
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    5,553
    Quote Originally Posted by kylesw View Post
    Hi guys, first time poster, so here goes:
    I love the concept of a quiver killer bike. Of course, within the category there is a spectrum - some bikes are more suited for the road and others lean more towards the gravel/off road persuasion. For me, I like riding centuries and long climbs, and supplement with fast, short rides on weeknights. All riding is on pavement, but sometimes it can be quite rough with exposed aggregate and cracks galore. Based upon that, I've been searching for a quiver killer that leans towards the road end of things.

    With that in mind, I'd like to give a shout out to my new quiver killer, the Diamondback Century 5 Carbon. It clears 32mm tires, is built up with quality components, and is competitively priced.

    DB is off most people's radar due to its rep as a "walmart bike", but I really think people should keep it in mind as an option. The bikes can be found on sale for great deals, and the builds are on par with most other major brands.

    I just received mine in the mail the other day, and have two rides totaling 50 miles. Thus far I am really impressed. The bike came boxed but mostly assembled, and it seems the factory did a good job (wheels true, fasteners properly torqued, etc). The wheelset is very nice (they are listed as HED flanders, but they are really just a rebadged ardennes, measuring 21mm internal and 26mm external). The rest of the bike is full ultegra with hydraulic disc brakes, and came dialed in (just had to mess with the cable tension a tiny bit). The stock prologo saddle seems quite comfy as well.

    The only changes I have made are swapping for a thomson 0 offset post (due to my personal geometry needs) and changing to Continental GP4000s II 28c tires (which, btw, measure out to 32.5 mm wide!).

    The frame stiffness is adequate to prevent chainrub while sprinting (and I weigh ~195 lbs), and the larger tires provide lots of comfort while still rolling fast.

    The best way to describe the handling is 'accurate' - it goes right where you point it. It does not feel racy like a bike with a steep head tube that is so eager to turn, yet it does not feel sluggish at all. For me, the handling is 'just right'.

    FYI I purchased a 56cm frame, but am 6'3". I am the classic "long legged, short torso" type of guy. Conventional wisdom would suggest I buy a 58 or a 60, but the the 56 is perfect for me! Be sure to work with a bike fitter before you buy!

    Let me know if you guys have further questions - I decided to post here because this thread brought me a lot of inspiration while choosing my newest bike. So I hope I can perpetuate the bike stoke!

    Ready to ride:


    Rear tire clearance at the seat stays:


    Rear tire clearance at the chain stays:


    Front tire clearance:

    Congrats on your new bike man and welcome. It looks good. There's nothing wrong with Diamondback bikes in my opinion. If they are what you like, then they are what you like. Team Rally Pro Cycling rides them and the bikes seem to hold up and perform just fine. Enjoy the bike and keep us updated.
    Every climb has its end, for verily with difficulty there is relief...

  5. #330
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Lombard's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    5,142
    Congrats on your new bike, Kylesw! Wishing you many happy miles ahead!
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

    "Beware of geeks bearing formulas."
    -- Warren Buffett

    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



  6. #331
    JSR
    JSR is online now
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    1,511
    Nice!

    All bikes should be shiny and red on their first day.

  7. #332
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    5,553
    Every climb has its end, for verily with difficulty there is relief...

  8. #333
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: jason124's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    342
    For those interested, here's a review of the new Specialized Diverge:

    https://www.bikerumor.com/2017/06/19...-future-shock/

  9. #334
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: jason124's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    342
    So today I had some time to kill as I was waiting for friends for dinner, went to a LBS to pick up some inner tubes and thought "what the hey... I'll test ride some bikes".

    Rode the following:
    Marin Gestalt 3 (Sram Rival 1x)
    Marin Lombard
    Marin Nicasio SS
    Bianchi Lupo
    Bianchi Strada (only flatbar of the bunch)

    Honestly, I was not particularly wowed by them. Part of it could be the stems being set to rise instead of flat, giving a more upright riding position, but fitment just felt a little cramped (all were 54 cm). I did about 1-2 miles with each bike but it was also a very warm day here at 98-100-ish degrees.

    I was hoping to sell my Cross Check and get one of these to use for commuter duty and the occasional gravel grind, but I may just sell the CC and keep commuting with the KHS Flite 800.

  10. #335
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    30
    So this showed up today



    It's my new Seven Axiom SL. Kinda designed as a quiver killer. Based around the ENVE GRD fork with clearance for 35c and fenders front and back. SRAM Force hydro disc. Pump peg and third bottle mount. Can't wait for the rain to stop - want a longer ride soon!




  11. #336
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Lombard's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    5,142
    Quote Originally Posted by jason124 View Post
    So today I had some time to kill as I was waiting for friends for dinner, went to a LBS to pick up some inner tubes and thought "what the hey... I'll test ride some bikes".

    Rode the following:
    Marin Gestalt 3 (Sram Rival 1x)
    Marin Lombard
    Wow, there's a bike named after me!

    Quote Originally Posted by jason124 View Post
    Honestly, I was not particularly wowed by them. Part of it could be the stems being set to rise instead of flat, giving a more upright riding position, but fitment just felt a little cramped (all were 54 cm). I did about 1-2 miles with each bike but it was also a very warm day here at 98-100-ish degrees.
    It sure sounds like your size may be a 56cm.
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

    "Beware of geeks bearing formulas."
    -- Warren Buffett

    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



  12. #337
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: jason124's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    342
    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    It sure sounds like your size may be a 56cm.
    When I was fitted, I was informed my frame size should be in the 52/53 cm range. I just went with what the shop owner suggested based on my current bike size. Are gravel bikes also inherently little more upright than conventional road bikes? I do still like the idea of a bike that takes wider tires and has disc brakes, I also haven't ridden an endurance geometry frame, so it may just be my expectations are wrong.

  13. #338
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Lombard's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    5,142
    Quote Originally Posted by jason124 View Post
    When I was fitted, I was informed my frame size should be in the 52/53 cm range. I just went with what the shop owner suggested based on my current bike size. Are gravel bikes also inherently little more upright than conventional road bikes? I do still like the idea of a bike that takes wider tires and has disc brakes, I also haven't ridden an endurance geometry frame, so it may just be my expectations are wrong.
    Gravel bikes have similar geometry to endurance road bikes. Cyclocross bikes have similar geometry to race road bikes. So the more upright position may be new to you. If you prefer a lower, more aggressive race position, you may want to look at Cyclocross bikes instead of gravel bikes. Though unless you plan to be competitive with it, a more upright position makes more sense on gravel and other tricky terrain.

    How tall are you? What is your inseam?
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

    "Beware of geeks bearing formulas."
    -- Warren Buffett

    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



  14. #339
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Posts
    49
    Quote Originally Posted by kylesw View Post
    Hi guys, first time poster, so here goes:

    FYI I purchased a 56cm frame, but am 6'3". I am the classic "long legged, short torso" type of guy. Conventional wisdom would suggest I buy a 58 or a 60, but the the 56 is perfect for me! Be sure to work with a bike fitter before you buy!
    I've been looking very hard at that exact bike for months. DB's pricing is more competitive than anyone and, IMO, it looks great. I'm also like you in that I've got more legs than torso.

    What'd your inseam?

  15. #340
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    142
    Yeah, the DB Century is one good-value bike option for the tall inseam, short torso folks.

  16. #341
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    2,474
    It's been neglected since I picked up the RoadMachine, but my Norco Search is a great all around bike. These things won some awards when they first came out a few years ago.

    I thought I might sell it as redundant after I bought the RM, but decided I would keep it due to fitting tires up to 38mm-40mm. It's advertised at 35mm max, but I believe that is with fenders mounted. I put some 40mm GravelKing SK's on. They cleared everywhere with plenty of room. The only exception being the seat stays, where there was only about 2mm on each side between the edge of the tread and the frame.

    In these pictures I have 36mm Clement X'Plor MSO Tubeless installed, and there is more than enough room.

    It's really comfortable with the compact geometry. Lot's of exposed seatpost. I duplicated my road bike setup on this, but after yesterdays gravel ride, I decided to move the bars back and up a tad to lessen the load on my hands.

    It is also a dream on descents. I was bombing down a dirt rail trail yesterday at close to 30 mph. There were a couple spots of looser gravel in areas, and the bike just cruised right over them with no squirreliness at all. It instills a lot of confidence.

    I had a blast!














  17. #342
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: jason124's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    342
    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    Gravel bikes have similar geometry to endurance road bikes. Cyclocross bikes have similar geometry to race road bikes. So the more upright position may be new to you. If you prefer a lower, more aggressive race position, you may want to look at Cyclocross bikes instead of gravel bikes. Though unless you plan to be competitive with it, a more upright position makes more sense on gravel and other tricky terrain.

    How tall are you? What is your inseam?
    The geometries makes sense now that you explain it. Doesn't CX bikes have higher bottom brackets which raises the center of gravity and makes them twitchier?

    I am 5'9" with a 31" inseam btw.

  18. #343
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Lombard's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    5,142
    Quote Originally Posted by jason124 View Post
    The geometries makes sense now that you explain it. Doesn't CX bikes have higher bottom brackets which raises the center of gravity and makes them twitchier?
    CX bikes do have slightly higher BB's. Will this make the bike twitchier? I can't answer that for sure. Do mountain bikes feel twitchy to you? They have higher BB's. My suggestion to you would be to test ride some and see how they feel to YOU.

    Quote Originally Posted by jason124 View Post
    I am 5'9" with a 31" inseam btw.
    I'm 5'10" with a 32' inseam and I'm definitely a 56. You may be on the cusp between 54 and 56. I would suggest trying a 56 and see how it feels.
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

    "Beware of geeks bearing formulas."
    -- Warren Buffett

    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



  19. #344
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Posts
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by alexdi View Post
    I've been looking very hard at that exact bike for months. DB's pricing is more competitive than anyone and, IMO, it looks great. I'm also like you in that I've got more legs than torso.

    What'd your inseam?
    Yeah, I've been quite pleased with the fit+finish of the bike! It has been riding very nicely.

    I have a true inseam of 91.5 cm, and a saddle height of 76.5 cm.

  20. #345
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: jason124's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    342
    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    CX bikes do have slightly higher BB's. Will this make the bike twitchier? I can't answer that for sure. Do mountain bikes feel twitchy to you? They have higher BB's. My suggestion to you would be to test ride some and see how they feel to YOU.
    I am basing the twitchy handling on my Cross Check as it is twitchy enough to make it difficult to ride without hands. Meanwhile when I ride my KHS, the steering is sharper (different rake and head tube angle, shorter wheel) but the ride is more stable and I can ride comfortably without hands.

    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    I'm 5'10" with a 32' inseam and I'm definitely a 56. You may be on the cusp between 54 and 56. I would suggest trying a 56 and see how it feels.
    I will have to keep that in mind next time I test ride, thanks for the info.
    Last edited by jason124; 06-27-2017 at 11:12 AM.

  21. #346
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    5,553
    Here's another option for the more road oriented crowd:

    New Wilier Cento10 NDR comes with seat stay suspension - Cycling Weekly
    Every climb has its end, for verily with difficulty there is relief...

  22. #347
    JSR
    JSR is online now
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    1,511
    Quote Originally Posted by Rashadabd View Post
    Here's another option for the more road oriented crowd:

    New Wilier Cento10 NDR comes with seat stay suspension - Cycling Weekly
    Very nice. Very spendy.

  23. #348
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    5,553
    Quote Originally Posted by JSR View Post
    Very nice. Very spendy.
    Yeah Willier is always pricey. All Italian bike brands seem to be for the most part.
    Every climb has its end, for verily with difficulty there is relief...

  24. #349
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: velodog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    5,939
    Too old to ride plastic

  25. #350
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: velodog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    5,939
    Rawland Ulv

    Too old to ride plastic

Page 14 of 15 FirstFirst ... 12131415 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 36
    Last Post: 02-15-2016, 09:41 AM
  2. Replies: 23
    Last Post: 04-04-2013, 01:06 PM
  3. Replies: 9
    Last Post: 10-08-2010, 02:38 PM
  4. Replies: 23
    Last Post: 03-29-2008, 05:32 PM
  5. Windsor "The Hour", Moto - "Messenger", Mercier - "Kilo". Differences???
    By midlife_xs's in forum Motobecane - Mercier
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 11-04-2007, 08:57 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •