Page 8 of 15 FirstFirst ... 678910 ... LastLast
Results 176 to 200 of 358
  1. #176
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    353
    Quote Originally Posted by Rashadabd View Post
    That's where my head is at currently and it's typically what I do, but I am kind of exhausted with the process (hunting for bargains on components online, etc). I used to love it, but I kind of just have this itch to buy and ride this time around (and upgrade later). We'll see. I like the grey and blue combo as well. It looks like it is on back order though, so I'll have to wait and see if it is even available anymore.

    I'm 5'6.5" with a 29" inseam. I typically fit a 51cm-52cm-small road bike just about right. It looks the 50cm is the size that would work best for me on the Niner. I don't typically buy without a fit session and/or test ride. I know others have different approaches, but it's just how I roll. This is my first experience with Niner, so I've never been to the local shop that sells them (which is unusual). I have no idea what they have in stock, but I will try to drop by in the next week or two to check it out and get more info.
    You're similar to me in that you're sort of between sizes (at least based on niner's sizing chart), although obviously a fitting and test ride will be more telling than the chart. The standover problem looks even worse in the small sizes though. The 50 has a standover height of 29.8 inches and the 53 is 30.75 inches. Granted, they don't specify which wheel/tire combo that corresponds to but still it seems high.

  2. #177
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    5,317
    Quote Originally Posted by cobra_kai View Post
    You're similar to me in that you're sort of between sizes (at least based on niner's sizing chart), although obviously a fitting and test ride will be more telling than the chart. The standover problem looks even worse in the small sizes though. The 50 has a standover height of 29.8 inches and the 53 is 30.75 inches. Granted, they don't specify which wheel/tire combo that corresponds to but still it seems high.
    I agree. It seems to be an issue with a lot of cx and gravel bikes.

  3. #178
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    5,317
    Here's the Devinci Hatchett for those interested in carbon:

    https://www.cxmagazine.com/devinci-h...ad-review-2017
    Every climb has its end, for verily with difficulty there is relief...

  4. #179
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: jason124's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    325
    Not sure if the Marin Gestalt and Nicasio falls into this category or if they are more on the gravel grinder spectrum, but they seem to be pretty affordable.



    I really wanted a RLT niner steel when I was shopping for bikes, but for the way I wanted it, it was not in my budget 2 years ago (that and I didn't know how serious I would get into cycling). Now days, I am kind of glad I didn't since it has a press fit bottom bracket. Much prefer a BSA to keep things simple.

  5. #180
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    5,317
    Quote Originally Posted by jason124 View Post
    Not sure if the Marin Gestalt and Nicasio falls into this category or if they are more on the gravel grinder spectrum, but they seem to be pretty affordable.



    I really wanted a RLT niner steel when I was shopping for bikes, but for the way I wanted it, it was not in my budget 2 years ago (that and I didn't know how serious I would get into cycling). Now days, I am kind of glad I didn't since it has a press fit bottom bracket. Much prefer a BSA to keep things simple.
    These are definitely within the realm of things we have been discussing. Nice find, thanks for sharing.

  6. #181
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    5,317
    It looks like you could get that new Marin Nicasio, pair it with an Enve cx fork or a Niner RLT fork and have a solid steel gravel bike for around $1300. You would eventually need to upgrade components as well though. Not bad at all if it rides well.

  7. #182
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: jason124's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    325
    When I test rode the Lombard, it was marketed as a gravel bike, these days it is an "urban" bike. But here's that video for your viewing pleasure


  8. #183
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Lombard's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    4,709
    Quote Originally Posted by jason124 View Post
    When I test rode the Lombard, it was marketed as a gravel bike, these days it is an "urban" bike. But here's that video for your viewing pleasure

    Whoa! You mean there's a bike named after me? How bad could it be?
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

    "Beware of geeks bearing formulas."
    -- Warren Buffett

    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



  9. #184
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: velodog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    5,805
    Saw this and thought maybe it would be of interest here.

    Photos: Best road and gravel bikes at NAHBS | VeloNews.com
    Too old to ride plastic

  10. #185
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    5,317
    Quote Originally Posted by velodog View Post
    Saw this and thought maybe it would be of interest here.
    Photos: Best road and gravel bikes at NAHBS | VeloNews.com
    Very cool. It looks like the Fox fork everyone was writing about was designed for the Alchemy bike. I look forward to reading some ride reviews about that one. I like the look of Low's aluminum rides, but they are super pricey and I highly doubt they ride any better than bikes like a Allez Smartweld or Cannondale Caad, which are basically half the price. The rest are varying degrees of interesting as well. Thanks for sharing.
    Every climb has its end, for verily with difficulty there is relief...

  11. #186
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    621
    I like the M series racer inspired colorway on the Breadwinner Lolo.

  12. #187
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    5,317
    There's finally a review of the Fuji Jari out:

    FUJI JARI 1.1: Budget Badass - Peloton Magazine
    Every climb has its end, for verily with difficulty there is relief...

  13. #188
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Posts
    46

    The "Quiver Killers"

    I am now locking my sights on a titanium frame. Really like this one
    https://22bicycles.com/products/drifter
    Just need to pick up a few side gigs!
    I've read several articles & threads relating to gravel-grinding and conventional thinking seems to be that 40mm tire clearance is enough to see you through most rides. Excluding serious, technical, single-track, what kind of surface would be difficult for a drop-bar bike with 40mm tires?
    Last edited by E6Flash; 03-16-2017 at 07:45 AM.

  14. #189
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    5,317
    Quote Originally Posted by E6Flash View Post
    I am now locking my sights on a titanium frame. Really like this one
    https://22bicycles.com/products/drifter
    Just need to pick up a few side gigs!
    I've read several articles & threads relating to gravel-grinding and conventional thinking seems to be that 40mm tire clearance is enough to see you through most rides. Excluding serious, technical, single-track, what kind of surface would be difficult for a drop-bar bike with 40mm tires?
    Nice, but yeah that price is pretty steep for a gravel bike. It will probably last a long time though. The litespeed t5g is about $1000 less and similar. I think you are basically right about tire size, but some people seem to really like 47mm 650b wheels for some courses. You can fit those on a bunch of these bikes.
    Every climb has its end, for verily with difficulty there is relief...

  15. #190
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Posts
    46
    Quote Originally Posted by Rashadabd View Post
    Nice, but yeah that price is pretty steep for a gravel bike. It will probably last a long time though. The litespeed t5g is about $1000 less and similar. I think you are basically right about tire size, but some people seem to really like 47mm 650b wheels for some courses. You can fit those on a bunch of these bikes.
    I would like a Ti bike to last a lifetime or, until I can no longer ride. One thought lately is that I may want something that can be used for cyclocross as well. I haven't to this point been interested in CX, but I find myself trying lots of new things I never thought I'd try at 40 years old. I know there are differences in geometry between gravel specific 'adventure' bikes & cross bikes. I see more riders with cross bikes using them for gravel races and grinduro type events than the other way around. Does anyone have any experience with CX bikes have any thoughts about this?

  16. #191
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: velodog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    5,805
    Quote Originally Posted by E6Flash View Post
    I would like a Ti bike to last a lifetime or, until I can no longer ride. One thought lately is that I may want something that can be used for cyclocross as well. I haven't to this point been interested in CX, but I find myself trying lots of new things I never thought I'd try at 40 years old. I know there are differences in geometry between gravel specific 'adventure' bikes & cross bikes. I see more riders with cross bikes using them for gravel races and grinduro type events than the other way around. Does anyone have any experience with CX bikes have any thoughts about this?
    For the price of that frame and fork you could very nearly get two steel frame sets, one CX and the other a gravel bike, and there's no reason that they wouldn't last the rest of your life.

    My wife and myself have both got bikes that are still being ridden that are over thirty years old, and I fully expect them to still be going strong when we aren't. Not trying to say that you should stay away from titanium, just saying that you don't need it if longevity is the only concern.
    Too old to ride plastic

  17. #192
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Posts
    46
    Quote Originally Posted by velodog View Post
    For the price of that frame and fork you could very nearly get two steel frame sets, one CX and the other a gravel bike, and there's no reason that they wouldn't last the rest of your life.

    My wife and myself have both got bikes that are still being ridden that are over thirty years old, and I fully expect them to still be going strong when we aren't. Not trying to say that you should stay away from titanium, just saying that you don't need it if longevity is the only concern.
    Good to know. Why does it seem like steel is considered to be less desirable than titanium? At least from what I've read. Ride quality?

  18. #193
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: velodog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    5,805
    Quote Originally Posted by E6Flash View Post
    Good to know. Why does it seem like steel is considered to be less desirable than titanium? At least from what I've read. Ride quality?
    I'm kind of partial, being a steel is real kinda guy, but I think you owe it to yourself to try and ride a couple of steel and titanium bikes and get a feel for yourself. Specially considering how long you're considering on keeping the bike.

    I think, if steel really is considered to be less desirable than titanium, it's only because steel has that "old school" vibe going. I've got old Columbus SL tubed road bikes, a modern Deddacciai oversized tubed road bike and a modern Randonneur bike and they all have their own ride qualities. Right now my favorite is the rando, and with it's 42mm tires I've had no issues on the little bit of gravel I've ridden it on.

    But really, ride at least one of the new carbon gravel bikes and then search out steel and titanium bikes to test ride and make a comparison. Once you decide, than you can look see what is to be had off the shelf, or research builders to see what they have to offer.
    Too old to ride plastic

  19. #194
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Posts
    46
    Quote Originally Posted by velodog View Post
    I'm kind of partial, being a steel is real kinda guy, but I think you owe it to yourself to try and ride a couple of steel and titanium bikes and get a feel for yourself. Specially considering how long you're considering on keeping the bike.

    I think, if steel really is considered to be less desirable than titanium, it's only because steel has that "old school" vibe going. I've got old Columbus SL tubed road bikes, a modern Deddacciai oversized tubed road bike and a modern Randonneur bike and they all have their own ride qualities. Right now my favorite is the rando, and with it's 42mm tires I've had no issues on the little bit of gravel I've ridden it on.

    But really, ride at least one of the new carbon gravel bikes and then search out steel and titanium bikes to test ride and make a comparison. Once you decide, than you can look see what is to be had off the shelf, or research builders to see what they have to offer.
    I will try. I've got plenty of time as I don't plan on buying a new bike in the near future. Just need the weather to get above 20 degrees here in the Midwest!

  20. #195
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    353
    This looks like a pretty cool bike: https://reebcycles.com/bikes/cx-gravel/sams-pants/

    It can fit a 2.1" tire and is Rohloff and belt drive compatible. It is also designed around a suspension-corrected fork so you can put on a suspension fork if you want.

  21. #196
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    5,317
    It's definitely interesting. I have developed an interest in a local builders' work. Zukas Cycles produces some really nice steel (and titanium I believe) rides. Definitely worth checking out. I met a shop owner that rides one when I was on a business trip in Dalton, Ga and he loves his. He said he will never go back to off the shelf bikes. I'm not sure I would ever feel that way since many off the shelf bikes fit me just fine, but I am officially intrigued.

    Featured Bike: Dustin Gaddis? Zukas Cycles All-Road Gravel Bike | Gravel Cyclist: The Gravel Cycling Experience

    Home Page

    https://www.bikerumor.com/2012/04/06...om-augusta-ga/
    Every climb has its end, for verily with difficulty there is relief...

  22. #197
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: velodog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    5,805
    Quote Originally Posted by Rashadabd View Post
    It's definitely interesting. I have developed an interest in a local builders' work. Zukas Cycles produces some really nice steel (and titanium I believe) rides. Definitely worth checking out. I met a shop owner that rides one when I was on a business trip in Dalton, Ga and he loves his. He said he will never go back to off the shelf bikes. I'm not sure I would ever feel that way since many off the shelf bikes fit me just fine, but I am officially intrigued.

    Featured Bike: Dustin Gaddis? Zukas Cycles All-Road Gravel Bike | Gravel Cyclist: The Gravel Cycling Experience
    His stuff looks nice. But I don't like the minimum clearance on the tire\fork combination on the bike in the link that I left in your post. I'd prefer to see more room between the tire and the fork, especially if the bike is going to see any mud or even debris which the tires may pick up.
    Too old to ride plastic

  23. #198
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Posts
    46

  24. #199
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: velodog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    5,805
    Quote Originally Posted by E6Flash View Post
    I think that I would find this bike more interesting with fixed chainstay length, leaving the headtube with the steeper angle and the two forks having having different offset, changing the trail.

    But that's just me.
    Too old to ride plastic

  25. #200
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    353
    Here are a couple more of the titanium variety:
    Kinesis Tripster ATR Version 2 - Kinesis Bikes
    https://www.alpkit.com/sonder/bikes/...frame-and-fork

    The price on the Camino seems almost too good to be true for ti

Page 8 of 15 FirstFirst ... 678910 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 36
    Last Post: 02-15-2016, 09:41 AM
  2. Replies: 23
    Last Post: 04-04-2013, 01:06 PM
  3. Replies: 9
    Last Post: 10-08-2010, 02:38 PM
  4. Replies: 23
    Last Post: 03-29-2008, 05:32 PM
  5. Windsor "The Hour", Moto - "Messenger", Mercier - "Kilo". Differences???
    By midlife_xs's in forum Motobecane - Mercier
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 11-04-2007, 08:57 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •