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  1. #1
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    The "Quiver Killers"

    I think this is an interesting segment of bikes. They are not being marketed as gravel bikes and they clearly are not cyclocross bikes. They tend to be in the style of your traditional endurance bike, but they have room for much wider wheels and tires, which makes them ideal for riding faster on all types of terrain. I don't know that I buy the argument that they provide anything that a good cx or gravel bike doesn't, but I really like the "new" features that a few of them bring to the table. I am interested in hearing others' thoughts:

    1) The BMC Roadmachine:

    Last edited by Rashadabd; 11-10-2016 at 02:34 PM.
    Every climb has its end, for verily with difficulty there is relief...

  2. #2
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    2) The Focus Paralane:

    Every climb has its end, for verily with difficulty there is relief...

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    3.) The 2017 Specialized Roubaix:

    Every climb has its end, for verily with difficulty there is relief...

  4. #4
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    4). The Canyon Endurace:

    Every climb has its end, for verily with difficulty there is relief...

  5. #5
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    5.) The Trek Domane SLR:

    Every climb has its end, for verily with difficulty there is relief...

  6. #6
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    All things considered, I think I like the BMC Roadmachine the most. It seems like it has a little racier geometry, appears to be more aero, but doesn't give up much in the weight or ride quality departments. The Focus Paralane is the most affordable by a significant margin and yet it is still one the lightest bikes in this group. The Trek Domane adds compliance features without much of a weight penalty. The greatest thing about these bikes in my opinion though is the ability to add a super wide wheelset like the new Enve 4.5 AR wheels. Here's a side by side comparison of three of the bikes and more on the wheels:

    https://cyclingtips.com/2016/06/bmc-...ther-all-road/

    Last edited by Rashadabd; 11-11-2016 at 04:45 AM.
    Every climb has its end, for verily with difficulty there is relief...

  7. #7
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    Every climb has its end, for verily with difficulty there is relief...

  8. #8
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    Every climb has its end, for verily with difficulty there is relief...

  9. #9
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    I see no reason that the 'endurance' bikes should not have clearance for 38c tires. In the real world, this opens the bikes up to much more use cases and has a very insignificant penalty in the aero department due to the extra clearance for what amounts to 1cm of extra room on the fork bridge.

    I could go with a cx bike, but I dont need the geo designed for short, sprinty races. I want a 'road bike' that can also be used off-road on a gravel/towpath as well. I get that a 25c tire can be used on crushed stone, but a 35c would be better for 99% of riders.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by heybrady View Post
    I see no reason that the 'endurance' bikes should not have clearance for 38c tires. In the real world, this opens the bikes up to much more use cases and has a very insignificant penalty in the aero department due to the extra clearance for what amounts to 1cm of extra room on the fork bridge.

    I could go with a cx bike, but I dont need the geo designed for short, sprinty races. I want a 'road bike' that can also be used off-road on a gravel/towpath as well. I get that a 25c tire can be used on crushed stone, but a 35c would be better for 99% of riders.
    I think it's far less than 99% but I pretty much agree with what you're saying.

    My gravel/cx/whatever you call it has room for 40mm tires. When I bought it I thought at 145 pounds there's no way in heck I'd ever use something that big but there was no down side to having that room so why not. Well, a couple rides though the woods with all the roots and protruding rocks made it pretty clear I could definitely benefit from 40mm tires for those type rides.
    What's great about this type of frame is I can do those type of rides with 40s then thrown on 25s and have a bike fully capable of fast road riding. It's like having two completely different bikes for the price of two sets of tires.

  11. #11
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    Before all the dominantly road bike companies jump on the cx/gravel scene, there was Niner making their BSB cx bike. If I were to get a gravel/cx/endurance bike, which is essentially what this topic is about, I would fancy getting the Niner BSB.

    However, living in Socal, there is nowhere to use a gravel/cx bike, other than to use them in a cx event, and even in these cx events, the courses are often man made and not a natural terrain. Same with gravel around here, there is no gravel roads.

    now, mountain biking, on the other hand, is very popular here and there are lots of mtb trail around here. Lately, I've seen some of the hippity-hip roadies wanting to get into "dirt" and so they bring out their cx/gravel bikes onto the dirt... but really, all these bikes are good for is fireroads. There is no way these bike would make for a good singletrack tool. Guess my point is, for Socal market, these bikes are not practical, it's like they're average at many things but good at nothing for the Socal road and mtb scenes.

  12. #12
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    I like a road bike that is comfortable off road also. I have one myself only in steel. I was going to do some gravel today but I just got a text from my friend to ride and he sticks to the road only. Anyway the ride is on and I am out of here for a while.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Strongbow View Post
    I think it's far less than 99% but I pretty much agree with what you're saying.

    My gravel/cx/whatever you call it has room for 40mm tires. When I bought it I thought at 145 pounds there's no way in heck I'd ever use something that big but there was no down side to having that room so why not. Well, a couple rides though the woods with all the roots and protruding rocks made it pretty clear I could definitely benefit from 40mm tires for those type rides.
    What's great about this type of frame is I can do those type of rides with 40s then thrown on 25s and have a bike fully capable of fast road riding. It's like having two completely different bikes for the price of two sets of tires.
    That's what I am seeing as well. Great post.
    Every climb has its end, for verily with difficulty there is relief...

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by aclinjury View Post
    Before all the dominantly road bike companies jump on the cx/gravel scene, there was Niner making their BSB cx bike. If I were to get a gravel/cx/endurance bike, which is essentially what this topic is about, I would fancy getting the Niner BSB.

    However, living in Socal, there is nowhere to use a gravel/cx bike, other than to use them in a cx event, and even in these cx events, the courses are often man made and not a natural terrain. Same with gravel around here, there is no gravel roads.

    now, mountain biking, on the other hand, is very popular here and there are lots of mtb trail around here. Lately, I've seen some of the hippity-hip roadies wanting to get into "dirt" and so they bring out their cx/gravel bikes onto the dirt... but really, all these bikes are good for is fireroads. There is no way these bike would make for a good singletrack tool. Guess my point is, for Socal market, these bikes are not practical, it's like they're average at many things but good at nothing for the Socal road and mtb scenes.
    I have only spent a little bit of time in SoCal, so I definitely can't disagree with your assessment. I will only point out that the bikes listed above have been designed for pure road riding not gravel roads at all. That's part of what makes them interesting in my opinion. It seems to be pure road road riders that are raving above the new Enve AR 4.5 wheels the most as well. The benefits of running wider wheels and tires is just as present on the road (less rolling resistance, larger contact patch, etc.) and that is of value regardless of where you ride.
    Every climb has its end, for verily with difficulty there is relief...

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by aclinjury View Post
    Before all the dominantly road bike companies jump on the cx/gravel scene, there was Niner making their BSB cx bike. If I were to get a gravel/cx/endurance bike, which is essentially what this topic is about, I would fancy getting the Niner BSB.

    However, living in Socal, there is nowhere to use a gravel/cx bike, other than to use them in a cx event, and even in these cx events, the courses are often man made and not a natural terrain. Same with gravel around here, there is no gravel roads.

    now, mountain biking, on the other hand, is very popular here and there are lots of mtb trail around here. Lately, I've seen some of the hippity-hip roadies wanting to get into "dirt" and so they bring out their cx/gravel bikes onto the dirt... but really, all these bikes are good for is fireroads. There is no way these bike would make for a good singletrack tool. Guess my point is, for Socal market, these bikes are not practical, it's like they're average at many things but good at nothing for the Socal road and mtb scenes.
    Exactly my point. A SoCal rider could take a Synapse disc (for example) and be happy on 25s for the road. However someone here in Ohio can buy that same bike and out some 35 or 38 on for gravel. (In my dream world at least).

    On a related note, I am considering the Niner RLT. Geo similar to a road bike (instead of cx) with clearance for larger tires.


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  16. #16
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    I like the Paralane and the BMC. The BMC is green which is 10x better then that flat black that almost every bike is. Iceland looks like a beautiful place.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by BikeLayne View Post
    I like the Paralane and the BMC. The BMC is green which is 10x better then that flat black that almost every bike is. Iceland looks like a beautiful place.
    I pretty much agree on all three points. BMC did a nice job with the paint schemes they used on the entire Roadmachine lineup IMO. Here's a new article comparing some of the bikes again.

    BMC Roadmachine 01 Ultegra review - BikeRadar

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  19. #19
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    Bikes like that could be very popular since we have all sorts of on/off road choices for any type of bike.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by BikeLayne View Post
    Bikes like that could be very popular since we have all sorts of on/off road choices for any type of bike.
    I agree. When you start adding in a few aero and race oriented features, these suddenly become the ideal choice for many recreational riders in my opinion. They are built for going fast for lots of miles over all kinds of terrain. Lots to like.

  21. #21
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    I came across a new addition to the Quiver Killer club. Here's the Eddy Merckx 525 Disc. It has pretty legit aero features, clearance for 30mm tires, two geometry options, and still might be the lightest bike in this group. It's pretty pricey, but very cool.

    6.) Eddy Merckx 525 Disc



    More info:

    2017 Eddy Merckx EM525 Disc Performance first look - BikeRadar USA
    Last edited by Rashadabd; 11-13-2016 at 09:07 AM.
    Every climb has its end, for verily with difficulty there is relief...

  22. #22
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    Every climb has its end, for verily with difficulty there is relief...

  23. #23
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    Here is a link to the Jamis series of on/off road bikes. They have models in carbon or steel. Possibly the steel bike is a little more off road then I would want but it is pretty cool for 2K. The first link is a photo of the steel version and the second link is a video that shows first carbon then steel.

    renegadeexploit


    https://youtu.be/8boqEoSFmDg

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by BikeLayne View Post
    Here is a link to the Jamis series of on/off road bikes. They have models in carbon or steel. Possibly the steel bike is a little more off road then I would want but it is pretty cool for 2K. The first link is a photo of the steel version and the second link is a video that shows first carbon then steel.

    renegadeexploit


    https://youtu.be/8boqEoSFmDg
    Not bad at all. I think I would spend the extra $400+ and get then entry level Paralane over that, but it seems like a solid option if you are leaning more toward gravel grinding/racing than road riding.

    https://www.focus-bikes.com/us_en/24...ne-tiagra.html
    Every climb has its end, for verily with difficulty there is relief...

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rashadabd View Post
    Not bad at all. I think I would spend the extra $400+ and get then entry level Paralane over that, but it seems like a solid option if you are leaning more toward gravel grinding/racing than road riding.

    https://www.focus-bikes.com/us_en/24...ne-tiagra.html

    I think I would also go with the Tiagra Paralane. That puts a real nice bike in a budget that I could live with if I found myself shopping for a new bike. I like a steel bike and all but the Jamis 2K model comes in at 24.5lbs. It's in the current road bike mag issue which is why I knew of it. Toss in some pedals, seat pack, pump and water and you are now pushing upwards of 30 lbs. I guess the weight is all in the wheels as a tig welded Reynolds 631 frame with carbon fork is not a heavy set up.

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