Results 1 to 18 of 18
  1. #1
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    32

    Rivendell Sam Hillborne vs 2012 Schwinn Slicker?

    I am looking for a relaxed geometry road bike for occasional commuting, relaxed group rides and occasional general use. It will not be my only bike. I have a "racier" steel road bike already, which I will keep. I do not race. I may prefer to stay with steel for this bike as well. I am used to modern brifters (Shimano in my case) for shifting.


    I was considering the Rivendell Sam Hillborne, and am still considering it, preferably set up with drop bars. It seems most people equip it with bar end shifters though I may opt for brifters if feasible and relatively easy.


    Another bike that caught my attention is the 2012 Schwinn Slicker, which being last years model can be gotten at a discount beyond it's already modest price. I did notice however that it had only one chainring.


    I find the appearance of both attractive, and do like the overall appearance of the Schwinn though the gold crank and brake levers are a bit over the top.


    I strongly suspect that the Sam Hillborne is the better bike but am wondering if it is really $2000 better?


    Any feedback regarding those two bikes?


    Any ideas, suggestions or feedback?

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    1,364
    Rivendell bikes are top notch IMO. Like any other commodity, they are only worth what you're willing to pay. I say, if you can get a nice lugged chromoly steel road bike, then what's a couple of grand? OTOH, if you can get a nice chromoly steel bike for kind of cheap, then why not? As long as the theme of the day is steel, then just do it!
    A chromoly steel bicycle will last just as long as titanium, if kept dry.

  3. #3
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Posts
    201
    rivendell is available as a frameset to which you will get to/have to add parts. the schwinn is a full built bike. riv is known for top notch paint, gorgeous lug work, relaxed geo and low bottom brackets. this schwinn currently is known as probably an inexpensive decent steel bike. i question the geo figures of that bike on that website.

    on the other hand, i might bet if you built up both frames with the same parts and could ride them both blindfolded you would be hard pressed to tell much difference and wonder why you'd spend that much money on a riv.

    if you want a nice cheap and decent steel frame to build up, why not a soma ES?

    or go half way with a fine fuji touring:

    Fuji Bikes | URBAN | URBAN | TOURING

    what are your values around bikes?
    Last edited by eflayer2; 06-10-2013 at 06:41 PM.

  4. #4
    old school drop out
    Reputation: laffeaux's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Posts
    1,543
    I own a Hilllborne, but can't comment on the Schwinn.

    My Hillborne is set up with mustache bars, barcons, is the older-style frame with canti brakes, and I run it with wide CX tires (I've used 38 and 45 mm tires). The frame is really nice too look at, nice lugs, and the paint is top notch (very thinly applied so the details of the lugs stand out). I enjoy riding the bike, and it makes a great commuter, light-duty trail bike, and a bike to use for exploring new areas. The ride is upright which gives great views - on my first trail ride I noticed things along the route that I'd never seen before.

    The downsides are that the bike is not light, and does not inspire me to go fast (although I'm not sure that that is a bad thing). The geo is pretty slack which might be an issue to some - I notice it more when riding on windy trails or making u-turns on the pavement.

    Looking at the Schwinn geo, it's less slack than the Hillborne. I really like my Hillborne, but would recommend riding before you buy as it does have a different feel. I sized down from what Riv said, and I'm happy with the size. They are "re-sizing" the new models, and I'd fit better into the middle of one of their new size ranges.

  5. #5
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    262
    If you like nice, steel, do-it-all type bikes, I would read up on the Gunnar Sport. It's a wonderful, all purpose bike.

  6. #6
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    32
    Quote Originally Posted by eflayer2 View Post
    rivendell is available as a frameset to which you will get to/have to add parts. the schwinn is a full built bike. riv is known for top notch paint, gorgeous lug work, relaxed geo and low bottom brackets. this schwinn currently is known as probably an inexpensive decent steel bike. i question the geo figures of that bike on that website.
    .....................
    Any reason you question the geometry on the Schwinn?

  7. #7
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: commutenow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    674
    What about a Handsome Devil which is steel and are very much like Bridgestone's from the past. I currently have one and really enjoy the ride. You can run tires up to 45's and and eyelets for rack and fenders. I consider this bike as an all rounder. I have mine set up as pretty much stock but you can build them up anyway you choose. Steel is real.
    never,never,never give up

  8. #8
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: mark4501's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    155
    Rivendell's are hand made by Waterford Precision Cycles in Wisconsin. Current Schwinn bikes, I believe, are manufactured in China or Taiwan.

    I have a Gunnar Sport and love it, and it too, is made by Waterford Precision Cycles. I would highly recommend it.

    Interestingly, Waterford bikes is operated by Richard Schwinn, great-grandson of the founder of Schwinn Co.

  9. #9
    User is infamous around
    Reputation: junior1210's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    708
    I think it depends on how much you want to spend on this project. That Rivendell frame costs 3x-4x as much as the built up Schwinn (at current price on Nashbar). I'm sure the Schwinn will do fine for JRA and such but I doubt that it will hold a candle to the Rivendell as far as quality goes. Also figure build cost of the Rivendell vs part replacement on the Schwinn (and you will be replacing parts as a lot of them from the Nashbar version won't hold up over time) to an acceptable level.

    If these were my only two choices I'd go with the Schwinn (because of the commuting/general use), since replacement cost would be low if stolen and since you stated you had other bikes for 'serious' riding. I'll admit I'm considering the Schwinn myself, as I like the concept of the bike, but I'm not deluding myself believing that the Schwinn will be the equal of a frame like the Rivendell or others of that caliber.

  10. #10
    old school drop out
    Reputation: laffeaux's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Posts
    1,543
    Quote Originally Posted by mark4501 View Post
    Rivendell's are hand made by Waterford Precision Cycles in Wisconsin. Current Schwinn bikes, I believe, are manufactured in China or Taiwan.
    Not all Rivendells are made by Waterford. My Hillborne was made by Maxway in Taiwan. Still a top notch job, but not US made.

  11. #11
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: mark4501's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    155
    Quote Originally Posted by laffeaux View Post
    Not all Rivendells are made by Waterford. My Hillborne was made by Maxway in Taiwan. Still a top notch job, but not US made.
    I did not know that...sorry to spread incorrect information.

    When I toured the Waterford factory last year, Richard mentioned making frames for Rivendell. He probably made the distinction in his comments that they make "some" frames for Rivendell, but I only committed part of the facts to memory. thanks -

  12. #12
    old school drop out
    Reputation: laffeaux's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Posts
    1,543
    Quote Originally Posted by mark4501 View Post
    I did not know that...sorry to spread incorrect information.

    When I toured the Waterford factory last year, Richard mentioned making frames for Rivendell. He probably made the distinction in his comments that they make "some" frames for Rivendell, but I only committed part of the facts to memory. thanks -
    No problem. Rivendell is pretty open to telling customer who built their frames, and uses multiple contractors: at least two in the US, and others overseas. According to Riv's web site, the current Hillbornes made with canti brakes are made by Waterford, but bikes with side-pulls are not.

  13. #13
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Eisentraut's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    217
    Frame for frame the extra 2K on a SH would be the lugs and paint but generaly speaking, a frame is a frame. I just built up a Sam Hillborne and have to say it's beautiful to ride and very fun to build. The other thing that you might take into consideration is the resale value in the future. While Schwinn is trying to come back from the dead (imho) they still have a long way to go. The Rivendell however is a classic right out of the box and should retain it's value for many many years. Here is a pic of my latest project

    Rivendell Sam Hillborne vs 2012 Schwinn Slicker?-img_0086.jpg

  14. #14
    User is infamous around
    Reputation: junior1210's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    708
    ^^ I agree, but I never understood the idea of buying a bike for resale value. If you're not gonna keep the bike for a good while (think at 2 years or more minimum) why drop that much on the bike in the first place?

  15. #15
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    1,364
    I took my new CF Gran Fondo on the Bart to downtown Frisco this morning. On the way across the bridge, this tall guy gets on with his Soma Triple Cross, complete with a black B-17 Imperial Brooks Saddle. It suddenly dawned on me...Some of the most beautiful steel bikes are actually derived from stock frames! Though my Gran Fondo aint't too shaby, I still remain envious of the Triple Cross...MSRP @ $2000Rivendell Sam Hillborne vs 2012 Schwinn Slicker?-soma-triple-x-3773699254952_2257_0.jpg
    Last edited by Zeet; 06-15-2013 at 06:07 PM.
    A chromoly steel bicycle will last just as long as titanium, if kept dry.

  16. #16
    Decrepit Member
    Reputation: Scooper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    1,563
    Quote Originally Posted by Zeet View Post
    I took my Gran Fondo on the Bart to downtown Frisco this morning. On the way across the bridge, this tall guy gets on with his Soma Triple Cross, complete with a black B-17 Imperial Brooks Saddle. It suddenly dawned on me...Some of the most beautiful steel bikes are actually derived from stock frames! Though my Gran Fondo aint't too shaby, I still remain envious of the Triple Cross @ $2000.
    American Cyclery at Stanyan and Frederick (San Francisco) has the Triple Cross frame for $1,699.

    EDIT - Just noticed the first frames are only in 56cm frame size. More sizes later.
    -Stan
    my bikes

  17. #17
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    1,364
    Quote Originally Posted by Scooper View Post
    American Cyclery at Stanyan and Frederick (San Francisco) has the Triple Cross frame for $1,699.

    EDIT - Just noticed the first frames are only in 56cm frame size. More sizes later.
    Looks like American Cyclery has some kinda deal going on with a Triple Cross, eh! However, no worries, Scoop! Your stainless steel Schwinn Paramount still retains the crown as the all time best forever!
    A chromoly steel bicycle will last just as long as titanium, if kept dry.

  18. #18
    old school drop out
    Reputation: laffeaux's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Posts
    1,543
    Quote Originally Posted by junior1210 View Post
    ^^ I agree, but I never understood the idea of buying a bike for resale value. If you're not gonna keep the bike for a good while (think at 2 years or more minimum) why drop that much on the bike in the first place?
    I think his point on the Rivendell is that it is a $1200 frame that you will likely be able to sell for a decent amount of money in 10 or 15 years. That's likely not the case with the Schwinn.

  19. #19
    User is infamous around
    Reputation: junior1210's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    708
    Quote Originally Posted by laffeaux View Post
    I think his point on the Rivendell is that it is a $1200 frame that you will likely be able to sell for a decent amount of money in 10 or 15 years. That's likely not the case with the Schwinn.
    Oh yes, of that there is no doubt.

  20. #20
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Posts
    201
    When I looked at the geo chart it says chainstay length is over 46 cm and total wheelbase is at just over 100 cm. That could be true, but makes me wonder it those numbers are correct. I wold think wheelbase would have to be longer with normal fork rake and huge long chainstays.


    Quote Originally Posted by haziz View Post
    Any reason you question the geometry on the Schwinn?

Similar Threads

  1. A one Year Review - Sam Hillborne
    By Fai Mao in forum Commuting, Touring and Ride Reports
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 11-12-2010, 02:41 PM
  2. Rivendell
    By afbiker in forum General Cycling Discussion
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 02-19-2008, 01:13 PM
  3. Schwinn Owners - Schwinn Circuit
    By trek7100 in forum Bikes, Frames and Forks
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 01-26-2008, 10:16 AM
  4. Replies: 8
    Last Post: 01-03-2006, 02:13 PM
  5. i would REALLY like a rivendell but...
    By colker1 in forum Bikes, Frames and Forks
    Replies: 61
    Last Post: 11-10-2005, 04:54 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Sea Otter Classic

Hot Deals

Contest


Latest RoadBike Articles


Latest Videos

RoadbikeReview on Facebook