Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    11

    Road bike for occasional triathlon

    I have been riding for about two years on a 2006 Trek 1000 and I am ready to upgrade. I'm a recreational rider and complete (no chance of winning, just doing for fun) a few triathlons a year.

    I want to upgrade a step in bikes either new, used, or old stock new. I was considering getting a triathlon bike but I think I will be better served with a road bike and adding clip on aero bars, seems more versatile to me.

    What bikes would you recommend for recreational (including century rides) but also doing tris? I was thinking maybe a Cervelo as they seem to be designed to be more aerodynamic. But this is just my novice observation.

    I'm looking to spend somewhere between $1000-1500 and don't mind searching/waiting for a really good deal.

  2. #2
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    266
    At my girlfriends last Tri, the guy that won the mens division was on an older Giant TCR carbon, with clip-on aero bars ... I think he averaged 25.5mph. So, yes it can be done.

    Since you plan to do centuries, I would focus on finding something with geometry that works for you (obviously), and a more compliant ride.

  3. #3
    Fecal indicator
    Reputation: Oxtox's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    6,229
    not sure how much the bike matters if you're only doing an occasional tri effort.

    I did the cycling leg of a team tri this wkend on a bone-stock 20-yr old Specialized Allez Epic...not exactly cutting-edge light-weight racing equipment, but still managed to place second in the division with a 19.5 mph avg.

    my observation was that a lot of the wkend warrior tri geeks didn't seem all that savvy about how to be competitive on a bike.

    altho some riders were very dialed in, saw others with some crazy cadences, lots of coasting, riding with enough water bottles to cross the Sahara, sitting upright while using aero bars, etc...

    so, honing your riding technique would probably help as much or more than a new bike.

    just my two centavos...
    eff all y'all...

  4. #4
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    175
    Don't get a TT/tri bike if you're just a recreational rider and only want to do a few tri's a year. I ride a TT bike as my only road bike and sometimes wish I had my old road bike back. It's fine most of the time, but they don't handle as well as road bikes, don't climb as well, and you have to ride low all the time. Overall it's quite a bit faster than a road bike, but it isn't as fun to ride.

    Cervelo's make nice aero road bikes, so does Blue. I wouldn't worry too much about the aero part though, it's 90% rider position. So if you can get a set of clip ons that get you low and comfortable, you'll be just fine. I'd worry more about finding a road bike that fits you well and handles well.

  5. #5
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    11
    Thanks all. Pretty much what I was thinking. At my girlfriends Ironman last year I could count the road bikes on one hand (out of 1500+ riders). Obviously an IM is more than an occasional Olympic or Sprint Tri, but it still surprised me that riders averaging 15 mph would have a $2000 tri bike.

    One thing I left out on upgrading; my Trek is a size too small so I am upgrading regardless.

    A few bikes I am considering at LBS: 2010 Felt F5 - $1700 (a little out of reach $$), 2011 Cannondale CAAD10 105 - $1400, 2011 Felt F75 - $1450, 2011 Trek 2.1 - $1500, 2011 - Blue RD1 - $1500.

    I need to test ride more to narrow it down.

  6. #6
    Fecal indicator
    Reputation: Oxtox's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    6,229
    [QUOTE=TahoeTexan;3458884]...
    but it still surprised me that riders averaging 15 mph would have a $2000 tri bike.

    /QUOTE]

    I was pretty amazed at the number of high-end rides being used by folks that were, um, less than lightning fast...but, if you got the dough to blow, it ain't a problem.

    buying a $5K bike and expecting that it is going to magically make you competitive is a fallacy.

    you need to train and know how to ride efficiently. trick wheels and aero bars don't do much good when you're pedaling 45 rpm.
    eff all y'all...

Similar Threads

  1. Clincher rim for road, gravel path and occasional cyclocross
    By rockstar2083 in forum Wheels and Tires
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 06-11-2011, 06:35 PM
  2. Road bike frame for Triathlon
    By iamddn in forum Racing, Training, Nutrition, Triathlons
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 03-23-2010, 06:18 AM
  3. Bike question--Road/Triathlon
    By FishrCutB8 in forum General Cycling Discussion
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 03-12-2007, 05:08 AM
  4. Triathlon bike vs. regular Road Bike.. need advice
    By mwilcko2 in forum Racing, Training, Nutrition, Triathlons
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 01-03-2006, 07:18 AM
  5. Ironman-triathlon bike or road converted?
    By nyquil in forum Components, Wrenching
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 09-07-2004, 02:55 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Hot Deals

Latest RoadBike Articles


Latest Videos

RoadbikeReview on Facebook