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  1. #1
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    Road Bike w/ a Long Head Tube - Suggestions?

    I currently own an '04 Trek 1000 that I Iike except for the short head tube. As a result, I have to stack the spacers pretty high in front for a comfortable fit. Any suggestions? I'm not picky about frame materials, name brands, or prices just yet. I just want something that doesn't require too many spacers in front. Thanks.
    Last edited by Tri Slow Poke; 01-24-2008 at 05:00 AM.

  2. #2
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    Ridley has long-ish headtubes.
    You may want to look at a Specialized Roubaix or Trek Pilot too, as they have a bit longer headtubes and are a bit more relaxed.

  3. #3
    Cycling induced anoesis
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    The Spec Allez HT length would be closer to what you have now, so depending on how much of a change you're looking for, it may or may not be an optimal choice. Felt Z series, Giant OCR's, Madone 4.5/ 4.7, and upper end new Madone (performance) models would all have slightly longer HT's than the Allez.

  4. #4
    Windrider (Stubborn)
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    Price range?

    New or used?

    Size...& what do you consider a long Head tube?

    How much do you weigh?

    Len



    "Evil....is the complete lack of Empathy!"

    ""We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit. " Aristotle

    No one is as bad as the worst thing they have done & no one is as good as the best thing they have done.........think of that when you feel like you understand someone.

  5. #5
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    Lemond Triomphe series, or the new Madone performance fit(30mm longer head tube than the pro). Both are fantastic bikes.

  6. #6
    desert smouth
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    Specialized Roubaix is what you want.

  7. #7
    Windrider (Stubborn)
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    I love these absolute recommendations without knowing his budget.

    Would you change your recommendation if he said his budget was $7,000 for the full bike?

    LOL

    Len
    '



    "Evil....is the complete lack of Empathy!"

    ""We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit. " Aristotle

    No one is as bad as the worst thing they have done & no one is as good as the best thing they have done.........think of that when you feel like you understand someone.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tri Slow Poke
    I currently own an '04 Trek 1000 that I Iike except for the short head tube. As a result, I have to stack the spacers pretty high in front for a comfortable fit. Any suggestions? I'm not picky about frame materials, name brands, or prices just yet. I just want something that doesn't require too many spacers in front. Thanks.
    Is it really the too-short headtube that you dislike, or the too-long top tube relative to the size?

    Just sayin', bike fit is a matter of proportion more than absolute size, since there are a range available (unless you are already on their largest / smallest size.)

    It might be worthwhile to pay the $100 or so for a professional fit. You'll then be able to find bikes that fit properly underneath you, or know that there's custom in your future.

    If you truly aren't concerned about price, the king of long head tubes is Serotta.
    A good habit is as hard to break as a bad one..

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Len J
    Price range?

    None so far

    New or used?

    No preference yet.

    Size...& what do you consider a long Head tube?

    I ride a size 56 Trek 1000. I don't know what I consider a long head tube. I suppose anything longer than what I have.
    How much do you weigh?

    170 lbs.

    Len

    Please see my answers above.

  10. #10
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    Thanks!

    I'm fairly certain that the top tube is long enough. I've been fitted and it was confirmed. The issue is definately the head tube length.

  11. #11
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    Hey Len,

    I understand completely what you're saying. I left price out of the equation intentionally so I could get a wide variety of responses.

    Then again, I guess I could just go custom if $7,000 was realistic!!

  12. #12
    Cycling induced anoesis
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    Simply put (actually, an oversimplification) TT length plays a part in reach and HT length, stack height. I'm assuming your issue is with stack height.
    Last edited by PJ352; 01-24-2008 at 06:48 AM. Reason: change..

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tri Slow Poke
    I'm fairly certain that the top tube is long enough. I've been fitted and it was confirmed. The issue is definately the head tube length.
    Missed my point. Trek's have unusually long TOP {edited 'cause I can't think and type} tubes for their vertical size. If you were buying a different brand of bike, when you got an appropriate TT length, the headtube would likely be longer, as you would be on a bike of a larger nominal size.

    Have you really been fitted, or did you spend 15 minutes on a trainer with the salesman that was trying to sell you the bike that he needed to move off the sales floor? There's a world of difference. A quality professional fitting is as much a coaching and education session as it is a measuring exercise.

    I'm not saying that you don't need a taller head tube - you probably do. But there are a bunch of ways to get one, and the various ways introduce different compromises depending on your on-bike goals. Point is, you don't 'just' want a taller head tube. Do you want longer stays with it? Will a taller HT present standover concerns? Do you need it because you are leggy, or because you are relatively inflexible?

    It's a trivial matter to go to the manufacturer's web sites and find HT lengths. It's a different matter entirely to understand what the numbers mean.
    Last edited by danl1; 01-26-2008 at 05:42 PM.
    A good habit is as hard to break as a bad one..

  14. #14
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    I don't get this

    Quote Originally Posted by Len J
    I love these absolute recommendations without knowing his budget.

    Would you change your recommendation if he said his budget was $7,000 for the full bike?

    LOL

    Len
    '

    He stated that he had not set a budget, so we offer responses to help and here you come to poo on everyone responding...

    by the way most suggested brands have different levels of trim available at different prices while retaining similar geometries.

    and no I would not.

  15. #15
    Windrider (Stubborn)
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    I think.........

    Quote Originally Posted by Tri Slow Poke
    Please see my answers above.
    that you would be crazy to do anything but custom then.

    You will get:

    - The material you want
    - The ride qualities you want
    - Made to your weight & riding style
    - Designed to your dimensions
    - The aestetics you want
    - Head tube length/Spacers/slope/no-slope
    - Paint/finish
    - The options you want
    - Pump Peg
    - Bottle location
    - Brake types
    - Etc.

    It is basicially a no-comprimise solution.

    Anything else may result in a comprimise somewhere. And at the price of high end "Stock" frames, customs, even from the best of the best, are a more than competitive solution.

    The only thing you give up is some time. Lead times can be anything from a few months to several years. IMO, that is a small price to pay. YMMV

    Len



    "Evil....is the complete lack of Empathy!"

    ""We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit. " Aristotle

    No one is as bad as the worst thing they have done & no one is as good as the best thing they have done.........think of that when you feel like you understand someone.

  16. #16
    Windrider (Stubborn)
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    Quote Originally Posted by akrafty1
    He stated that he had not set a budget, so we offer responses to help and here you come to poo on everyone responding...

    by the way most suggested brands have different levels of trim available at different prices while retaining similar geometries.

    and no I would not.
    Well.....

    the nuber of alternatives go up the more money you are willing to spend.

    I'm surpised that you think the Madone and/or the Lemond are the pinnacle of choices....especially when you have no idea of his riding style, or any other of his biases other than head tube length....& even that you have no idea of how many spacers he is trying to eliminate.

    I stand by my original post.

    Len



    "Evil....is the complete lack of Empathy!"

    ""We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit. " Aristotle

    No one is as bad as the worst thing they have done & no one is as good as the best thing they have done.........think of that when you feel like you understand someone.

  17. #17
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    pegoretti makes long head tubes.
    not cheap (but not Seven or Serotta-expensive, either), but great bikes.
    and you can get a custom for not a whole lot more money.

  18. #18
    wim
    wim is online now
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    Just a general observation: over the last year or so, more and bikes, including some Treks, have had their head tubes lengthened relative to their nominal size. Up until the 2008 model year, most Trek performance road bikes have had unusually short head tubes relative to their nominal size. So these days, it should be easy for the OP to find a bike his size with a head tube much longer than the one on his '04 Trek.

    Providing you can get your preferred reach without resorting to a stubby stem, it may also be useful to re-examine how much standover clearance and saddle-to-bar drop you want or need. For some riders, choosing the largest acceptable frame makes more sense than choosing the smallest acceptable one.

  19. #19
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    For some riders, choosing the largest acceptable frame makes more sense than choosing the smallest acceptable one. Word...... This is also a function of the threadless vs threaded design. With 1" threaded, it'd be a simple matter to put in a long shafted Nitto, and raise the bars up a full 2" or more, without dorky riser stems or steering tube extenders. For everyone except racers, where the weight really does matter, I think 1 and 1/8th threadless is a step backwards. Because I'm relatively inflexible, (6 crumbling verterbrae will do that), my next frame is probably gonna have to be 1" threaded.

  20. #20
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    Roubaix is a very good choice, as is the Felt equivalent (forget the model number) and, the Trek performance fit. All these offer a taller head tube, and a bike that will likely ride as good or better than any $7K bike. Good bikes don't cost that much . Vanity does.

  21. #21
    now in philadelphia
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    What about the new Cervelo RS. It's the R3, only with longer HT.


  22. #22
    now in philadelphia
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    I am personally considering building up an RS for the upcoming race reason.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by danl1
    Missed my point. Trek's have unusually long head tubes for their vertical size. If you were buying a different brand of bike, when you got an appropriate TT length, the headtube would likely be longer, as you would be on a bike of a larger nominal size.

    Have you really been fitted, or did you spend 15 minutes on a trainer with the salesman that was trying to sell you the bike that he needed to move off the sales floor? There's a world of difference. A quality professional fitting is as much a coaching and education session as it is a measuring exercise.

    I'm not saying that you don't need a taller head tube - you probably do. But there are a bunch of ways to get one, and the various ways introduce different compromises depending on your on-bike goals. Point is, you don't 'just' want a taller head tube. Do you want longer stays with it? Will a taller HT present standover concerns? Do you need it because you are leggy, or because you are relatively inflexible?

    It's a trivial matter to go to the manufacturer's web sites and find HT lengths. It's a different matter entirely to understand what the numbers mean.
    Hello,

    You bring up excellent points. To answer your first question, I did get a professional fitting, but I already bought the Trek. The fitter didn't recommend a new bike for me. They knew I was broke at the time so they didn't put the sales pitch on me!

    I'm don't think I would have a problem with standover height if I went up a size. However,
    I'd be concerned about the reach. I'm all legs and I'm on the inflexible side.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tri Slow Poke
    I'm don't think I would have a problem with standover height if I went up a size. However,
    I'd be concerned about the reach. I'm all legs and I'm on the inflexible side.
    Point is, get off the overly long Trek geometry, and you are less likely to have that problem.

    If you wouldn't have problem with standover, my original thought has merit - your problem is less that your HT is too short, but that your TT is too long. Find a bike with shorter geometry and choose a taller size. Can't possibly judge if that's the solution from here of course, but it's as fair a bet as any.

    This is where the professional fitting comes in handy. Get your documents out, look up your calculated frame (horizontal distance from BB to top of HT) and stack (vertical distance of same) and it's easy to find a bike that fits. Unfortunately, the various brands don't have a common measurement standard, so there's going to be a bit of trig involved in evaluating the various brands / models.

    One possibility: Depending on your height, many Italian frames tend to stay relatively shorter (in reach) as they get taller. If you are up in the 58 or larger range, you might find some help there. There are a couple of Merckx models (not all, though) that act this way, too.
    A good habit is as hard to break as a bad one..

  25. #25
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    Specialized Roubaix... The Roubaix HT is 1.25 inches longer than the Tarmac. I've owned both. Price range from $1,300 to $6,000. Just say'n.

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